How To: Clean a Jetted Tub

Don't let your relaxing soak in your whirlpool tub be cut short by unsightly debris floating in the water! Use these steps to get both tub and jets squeaky clean so you can again relax in your crystal-clear oasis without fear of filth.

How to Clean a Jetted Tub

Photo: fotosearch.com

Let’s be honest here: No matter the touted health benefits of its massaging hydrotherapy, a jetted tub can be only as restorative and relaxing as it is clean and sanitary. Therefore, in order to enjoy the soothing effects of a whirlpool bath, you need to get your hands dirty now and again. True, it doesn’t take hours of punishing labor to clean a jetted tub, but it’s not a quick and easy process either. After all, cleaning even a regular tub takes some time, so it stands to reason that with its many components and hard-to-reach crevices, it’d be even more work to clean a jetted tub. Fortunately, the joy of having such a calming respite from a stressful world makes the cleaning well worth the effort. Keep reading now for a step-by-step tutorial on how to clean a jetted tub with a minimum of hassle. Before you begin, though, note that while the process below provides a useful guideline, you should always follow the care and cleaning instructions provided by the manufacturer of your specific tub model.

MATERIALS AND TOOLS
- Baking soda
- Vinegar
- Dishwashing powder or liquid (optional)
- Bleach (optional)
- Measuring cup
- Soft cloth
- Toothbrush
- Bucket
- Dental floss (optional)

How to Clean a Jetted Tub - Modern Bath Detail

Photo: fotosearch.com

STEP 1
Start by flushing the accumulated gunk and worrisome bacteria out of the internal tub plumbing. To begin, wipe up any hair or other debris from the basin or rim, then fill the tub until water stands at least a couple of inches above the jets. (If it’s been a while since you last cleaned the tub, it’s best to fill it with hot water.) Once the tub is full, you have a few options in cleaning agents (as always, first consult the manufacturer’s instructions). Option one is to add about two cups of vinegar into the water. Because it’s acidic, vinegar dissolves buildup effectively but unlike many commercial cleaning products, it does so without damaging tub components. As an alternative, try 1/2 cup of bleach along with a few teaspoons of powdered or liquid dishwashing detergent. (Some manufacturers do not recommend bleach, which can dry out the gaskets over time.) Or you can purchase one of the many commercial products formulated specifically for cleaning jetted tubs, following the instructions on the packaging.

STEP 2
Now it’s time to activate the jets, but before you turn them on, turn off the air-induction valves (unless the manufacturer of your tub specifically recommends leaving them open). Closing the induction valves forces water to circulate only through the internal plumbing of the tub. This concentrates the flow, resulting in a deeper cleaning. With the valves closed (or not), run the jets on high for 10 or 15 minutes, or until debris from the internal plumbing stops washing into the water in the tub.

STEP 3
Drain the water from the tub. Now, after coming to terms with the disgust you feel over the amount of filth that’s probably lining the tub basin at this point, fill it up again with warm water a few inches above the jets. Run the tub on high once more for another 10 to 15 minutes in order to flush out even more gunk. Drain the water.

STEP 4
OK, it’s time for some good, old-fashioned scrubbing (regrettably, no one has figured out how to clean a jetted tub in a completely hands-off, no-effort way.) Grab a soft cloth and some baking soda; the latter works great to break up mold, mildew, and soap scum. Sprinkle a generous amount of baking soda inside the tub, let it sit for several minutes, and then use the soft, dampened cloth to scrub away the grime. Conveniently, you can also use the baking soda on the faucet and drain too. Try not to scrub too vigorously as you go along. Most whirlpool tubs are made of acrylic, a material that can be scratched or gouged, not easily, but sometimes, if you’re not careful.

STEP 5
You’ve come a long way, but there’s still one last thing to do—that is, address the muck and bacteria that may be lodged in and around the water jets. With a toothbrush that you use only for cleaning, gently scrub the jet nozzles and the contoured trim around those nozzles. If you can see buildup on a nozzle but can’t reach it with the toothbrush, try to dislodge it with a length of dental floss. Also, remember to clean the air-intake cover by unscrewing it, giving it a soapy brushing, rinsing it off, and screwing it back into position. Finally, give the tub a thorough rinsing.

STEP 6
At last, you’re finished! Reward yourself with a leisurely soak, because hey, you deserve it. But remember: If you want to get the most out of your jetted tub, a once-in-a-blue-moon cleaning isn’t enough. Routine maintenance is key. If your tub is used only occasionally, you may be able to get by with cleaning it four times a year. But if you enjoy frequent whirlpool baths, follow the procedure described above at least once a month. Now that you know how to clean a jetted tub, you can expect the process to go much more speedily the next time.


Comments
  • Favorites Flipboard Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email AddThis
SEE MORE IN
Bathroom
x