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Bob Vila Radio: Using Fire Extinguishers

Did you know there are times when using a fire extinguisher can actually make matters worse?

You probably wouldn’t think of living in a home without smoke detectors—they are proven lifesavers. But what about fire extinguishers? Is it smart to have one in your home? And in the event of a fire, does it make sense to use it?

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Listen to BOB VILA ON USING FIRE EXTINGUISHERS or read the text below:

Using a Fire Extinguisher

Photo: shutterstock

The answer is not so clear-cut. It’s true that a fire extinguisher, if it’s the right type and properly used, can keep a small fire from turning into a larger one. But although it makes sense to put out a fire in a wastebasket before it spreads to consume an entire home, using the wrong type of extinguisher, or not using it correctly, can actually make matters worse.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has guidelines for when to use a fire extinguisher. First, pick up your extinguisher only after the fire department has been called and all other occupants alerted. And try to use it only on a fire that is contained in a single place, such as a wastebasket.

Second, identify your means of escape before you use a fire extinguisher, and don’t use it if the fire is between you and that escape route.

Finally, don’t use an extinguisher if you are breathing in smoke, or if your gut instinct tells you that the situation is not safe. When in doubt, get out.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


Weekend Projects: 5 Unique Coasters You Can Easily Create

If you DIY your own coasters, they won't only keep your wood furniture safe from water rings, but they can also express a little bit of your personality. Here's how.

In bars and restaurants, drink coasters often bear the logos and slogans of popular beverage brands. At home, DIY coasters are equally communicative, but rather than promote businesses, they show off your individuality and personal sense of style. No matter what you care about most—nature, travel, literature, or something else entirely—it’s easier than you thought to channel your passion into a set of DIY coasters. Scroll down now to see five favorite examples from around the Web.

 

1. ROCK IT OUT

DIY Coasters - Stone

Photo: taradennis.com

These stone border tiles turned DIY coasters are an earthy accent sure to draw attention whether in a modern or traditional living space. Tara Dennis explains how to make them. It’s quick and super simple: Apply a coat of clear varnish to the tops of the tiles, and to protect your furniture from scratches, put surface savers on the bottoms.

 

2. FIND A WAY

DIY Coasters - Map

Photo: thewritestuffdesign.etsy.com

Working with cutouts from road maps or an old atlas, or even Internet printouts, you can use decoupage to transform ceramic or porcelain tiles into DIY coasters that celebrate your favorite travel destinations, neighborhoods where you’ve lived, or your hometown. Visit The Country Cottage for the easy step-by-step tutorial.

 

3. CAST A SPELL 

DIY Coasters - Scrabble Tiles

Photo: shopallthings.etsy.com

Looking for a gift to give a person who’s always playing word games? Why not repurpose that old Scrabble set gathering dust in your attic? Domestic for Dummies shows how it’s done. All you need are hot glue and a sheet of thin cork. Probably the hardest part is choosing the words to spell out on the squares.

 

4. SHOW SOME GLASS

DIY Coasters - Beach Glass

Photo: sincerelykinsey.blogspot.com

Devote part of your sea glass collection to creating these perky, refreshing DIY coasters. First, place an arrangement of glass onto square or circular cork coasters. Next, trace the outline of each piece of glass. Finally, cut out the shapes you’ve drawn and glue the glass into the slots you’ve made. Sincerely Kinsey explains it all.

 

5. HAVE A BALL

DIY Coasters - Felt Balls

Photo: inspiredbycharm.com

Bright and colorful, these DIY coasters are made of wool felt balls that you can purchase either online or in your local craft store. Simply glue the balls on top of cork coasters. Better yet, if you are skilled with a needle and thread, you can sew the balls together in a circular pattern. Want details? Check out Inspired by Charm.


Bob Vila Radio: Frameless Shower Doors

Free of the metal hardware that so strongly defined these bathroom elements in previous decades, frameless shower doors are safe, visually light, and easy to clean.

Glass shower doors have been popular alternatives to shower curtains for decades. Both serve the same simple purpose, which is to keep the spray of water inside the tub or shower stall.

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Listen to BOB VILA ON FRAMELESS SHOWER DOORS or read the text below:

Frameless Shower

Photo: shutterstock.com

Shower curtains are inexpensive to purchase and easy to replace, but the liners quickly get moldy (when the curtain is left open and water stays in the folds). When the curtain is pulled shut to dry out, however, the room becomes visually smaller. Both of those factors help account for the surge in popularity of shower doors. They are easy to clean, and their transparency makes even the smallest bathroom seem larger.

The shower doors you may remember from the ’70s and ’80s, with their metal frames and tracks, have largely given way to frameless models. Frameless shower doors have minimal hardware, so there are fewer places for soap or grime to build up. That makes them visually cleaner as well—all you see is a wall of glass.

Like all shower doors since the ’70s, frameless doors are made of tempered glass, which crumbles into small pieces instead of large shards, if it’s ever broken. The doors are so sturdy that breakage isn’t much of a concern, but you do want to be sure that the door is properly installed so that it closes against soft bumpers, not hard ceramic tile.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


5 Things to Do with… Coffee Grounds

Once you've had your daily cup (or three or four), save those coffee grounds for one of these smart uses.

If you drink coffee, chances are that you drink it every day. Sure, sometimes you get it on the go, but if you’re anything like me, there are plenty of occasions when you brew the stuff at home. Now, think back over the years to all the coffee grounds you’ve chucked into the garbage. If that strikes you as a waste, then you may be interested to know there are many different practical uses for coffee grounds both in and around the home—and a few might even surprise you!

 

1. FERTILIZE YOUR GARDEN

Uses for Coffee Grounds - Fertilizer

Photo: unh.edu

Coffee grounds contain calcium, potassium, nitrogen, and phosphorus, all of which are highly beneficial to plant growth. Aware of these qualities, experienced gardeners have long known that one of the best uses for coffee grounds is adding it as a fertilizer near acid-loving varieties like azaleas and rosebushes.

 

2. FIX UP FURNITURE

Uses for Coffee Grounds - Furniture

Photo: onegoodthingbyjillee.com

Some uses for coffee grounds may seem odd, but believe it or not this trick really works: Yes, coffee grounds can effectively conceal a scratch in dark wood furniture. With a cotton swab, rub the grounds into the scratch (or scratches), let them sit for 5 or 10 minutes, then clean them off with a dry cloth.

 

3. DETER SNAILS

Uses for Coffee Grounds - Snails

Photo: wikimedia.org

You learn something new every day: Snails hate caffeine. In fact, if the dosage is a high enough, caffeine can be lethal to gastropods. So, if snails have been sabotaging your flower beds and vegetable patches, try sprinkling coffee grounds at the base of affected plants. Many people say that tea leaves work, too.

 

4. DEODORIZE YOUR FRIDGE

Photo: wehatecleaning.co.uk

Is your refrigerator or freezer getting a little funky? Let a bowl of coffee grounds sit for several hours or overnight. The granules not only absorb foul odors, but also impart their own refreshing scent. If you love the effects of coffee but not its smell, try mixing in a few drops of vanilla or cinnamon extract.

 

5. ENRICH COMPOST

Uses for Coffee Grounds - Compost

Photo: groundtoground.com

Coffee grounds make an excellent addition to the backyard compost heap, because they contain nitrogen, which compost can’t do without. Also, coffee grounds attract the earthworms that further aid decomposition. Just remember to balance the nitrogenous grounds with carbon-rich materials such as leaves.


Bob Vila Radio: Microwave Steam Cleaning

It's a fact of life that microwaves get dirty over time. When it's time to give yours a wipe-down, follow these steps to make this workhouse appliance sparkling clean and fresh-smelling.

The best way to keep your microwave clean is to wipe it down after every use. But that doesn’t always happen—you’re in a rush, or the kids make themselves a snack and leave a mess behind. Before you know it, you’ve got caked-on food on the carousel, the walls, and even the top of the oven.

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Listen to BOB VILA ON MICROWAVE STEAM CLEANING or read the text below:

Microwave Steam Cleaning

Photo: LG

Before you start scrubbing with a chemical cleanser that could end up in your next serving of pasta, try grandma’s best cleaning product. Sponge on a paste of baking soda and vinegar, then wipe down the appliance interior with four tablespoons of baking soda dissolved in warm water. Finally, wipe with plain water.

For a steam cleaning that leaves your microwave fresh as well as clean, squeeze the juice of two lemons into a microwave-safe bowl, then add the rinds and two cups of water. Microwave on high until the water comes to an active boil. Turn the oven off but leave it closed, with the bowl inside, for ten minutes. After that, remove the bowl, wipe down the interior, and wash the carousel.

You’ll be left with a microwave that’s not only sparkles, but also smells fresh and lemony.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


The Great ESCAPE—A Prairie-Style Cabin on Wheels

See how a 400-square-foot cabin—designed on a human scale and with style to spare—can be spacious, inexpensive, and even movable.

Canoe Bay Escape

Photo: Canoe Bay Escape

Meticulous is the word that comes immediately to mind when you first see ESCAPE, the cabin-on-wheels designed by SALA Architects in conjunction with Dan Dobrowolski, owner of the luxurious Canoe Bay resort in Chetek, Wisconsin.

The tiny 400-square-foot structure, informed and inspired by the Prairie style, is the culmination of more than two thoughtful decades during which Dobrowolski oversaw the building or renovation of 17 structures at the resort, including a lodge, a restaurant, and a collection of gem-like cottages. Canoe Bay was at first an ambitious, learn-by-doing enterprise for the network meteorologist turned hotelier. Over time, the resort’s architecture matured into a sophisticated, cohesive aesthetic that is reflected in the design of ESCAPE.

TAKE THE HOUSE TOUR HERE

“Twenty years ago, I bought an abandoned church camp and developed it into a world-class hotel and restaurant,” he says. “We’re in Wisconsin, home of Frank Lloyd Wright, so we adopted our native son’s architectural style for our property.”

Canoe Bay Escape

Photo: Canoe Bay

Showing savvy design instinct in his vision for Canoe Bay, Dobrowolski recruited Wright protégé John Rattenbury, a cofounder of Taliesin Architects in Arizona. He then brought in Kelly Davis from SALA Architects in Stillwater, Wisconsin.

Their designs paid off in spades, as the evolving architectural language they’ve articulated is immensely popular today. Five thousand people pass through Canoe Bay every year, pausing to stay in Dobrowolski’s carefully crafted cottages, to enjoy the outdoor life on three lakes tucked into 300 acres, and to commune with eagles, otters, and bears out in the middle of nowhere.

And now they also come to admire the ESCAPE.

Although the little home takes its cues from the standard park model recreational vehicle (RV), it doesn’t suffer from the standard claustrophobic interiors, usually the result of attempting to cram in every possible luxury, appliance, and gadget known to mankind.

No, this cozy structure has been deliberately built to feel spacious, an effect achieved in part by its cathedral ceiling, but also by its simplicity; the interior is stripped down to the basics without sacrificing style or scale. “It’s a different kind of animal,” Dobrowolski says. “We came at it from a different angle—from the building side.”

A park model RV—taxed as personal property rather than real estate—is restricted by law to a size of just 400 square feet of enclosed space, excluding a porch or deck. So the designers and builders had to adapt. “We decided to see if we could make our architecture fit that size,” he says.

First, they designed ESCAPE on a human scale, despite the limitations of its 14-foot-by-28½-foot dimensions (14 by 40 with the optional screened porch). Second, they did not scrimp on either materials or features. ESCAPE is clad in cedar outside and yellow pine inside, with oak floors. There’s built-in cabinetry everywhere, and a fireplace crafted from weathered aluminum sits in a corner of the main living area. In the bedroom, a huge armoire provides both drawers and hanging space. The full-size kitchen accommodates a standard 30-inch range, and the expansive bath includes such amenities as a walk-in tile shower, a double vanity, and a separate toilet room. “Everything is normal-sized, with high-quality elements,” he says. “It’s built for real people—I’m a big person, and Wisconsin has a lot of full-sized people, so that’s the way it’s built.”

Canoe Bay Escape

Photo: Canoe Bay

To say that ESCAPE is energy efficient is like saying that Frank Lloyd Wright was somewhat gifted. The prototype now on-site at Canoe Bay requires very little electricity. In fact, with every LED on, the lighting uses perhaps 120 watts total, and the entire home could be solar-powered. “The refrigerator and television would eat up most of the energy,” Dobrowolski says. “The energy bills for this prototype have never met the minimum bill of 30 bucks—it’s never gotten close.”

ESCAPE is constructed in the same manner as a traditional stick-built home, with a balloon frame and standard windows, trusses, roofing, siding, and floors. It just happens to lie on top of a steel frame on wheels. “It complies with the federal code, just like an RV,” he says. “It can be pulled anywhere—and the wheels can stay on, with a plywood skirt that covers them.”

Canoe Bay Escape

Photo: Canoe Bay

At 22,000 pounds, however, it’s not something that can be towed around on the rear of a pickup. Like a mobile home, ESCAPE requires the power of an over-the-road tractor to get it where it’s going. But once on-site, setup is essentially a “plug and play” process for plumbing, wiring, and the like. “It takes four to five hours, and we’re done,” he says. “You can take the wheels off if you want, and the hitch too.”

A stripped-down model, sans screened porch, starts out at $79,000. Add the porch, a heated floor for the bath, and all the furnishings, and ESCAPE can top out at $124,000, window coverings included. “You have to bring your own clothes,” he says. “But then you’re ready to have fun.”

ESCAPE can be financed as you would a car or RV, rather than with a mortgage. The monthly payments, he says, are less than the rent for a one-bedroom apartment. Better yet—and unlike an apartment—the ESCAPE can be moved if need be.

Dobrowolski says he’s been surprised by the “tsunami” of demand for the little building since its debut late last year, but he believes he’s hit a nerve. So far, he’s received commitments for more than 100 units, a number of them destined for large campgrounds and resorts out West.

“I’ve immediately solved their problems,” he says. “If I deliver 20 of these to them, then they’ve got an instant resort.”

If only, he says with perfect hindsight, he’d thought of it 20 years ago.

 

J. Michael Welton writes about architecture, art, and design for national and international publications. He also edits and publishes a digital design magazine at www.architectsandartisans.com.


How To: Make Chalkboard Paint

Chalkboard paint has so many uses, both practical and playful, but it comes at a price and selection can be limited. Get all the fun for less by making your own.

How to Make Chalkboard Paint - Kitchen Wall

Photo: theVSIgroup.com

Chalkboard paint lets you transform any wall into an endlessly reusable writing surface. Although it’s readily available online and in stores, chalkboard paint, which retails for about $25 per quart, doesn’t come cheap. Plus, it’s available in limited colors. Good thing it’s so easy to eschew the store-bought variety and make it yourself. When you make chalkboard paint yourself, it’s first and foremost cheaper—but even better, you can create virtually any color you want!

MATERIALS
- Flat-finish latex paint
- Unsealed tile grout
- Mixing tray or bucket
- Paintbrush or roller
- Drill/driver with paint mixer drill attachment
- Chalk
- Dry towel

Notes on purchasing materials:
• Most local hardware stores, paint supply depots, and home improvement centers offer deep discounts on paint cans that other customers have returned. If you like one of these returned colors, capitalize on others’ misfortunes by purchasing as much discounted flat-finish latex paint as you think you’ll need for your project.

• In stores, you can usually find packages of grout only in quantities larger than what’s necessary for making chalkboard paint. So unless you have a big tiling job on your to-do list, try to acquire a cup or two of grout from a friend or neighbor who has recently completed some remodeling work.

STEP 1
Unable to purchase discounted paint in the perfect color for your space? Don’t fret! You can close the gap between what you have and what you want by mixing in white paint to create lighter tones. In this way, a rich brown can be coaxed into a soft tan, or a deep purple can be softened into a lavender shade.

How to Make Chalk Paint - Mix

Photo: improvisedlife.com

STEP 2
Once you are happy with the paint color, add the magic ingredient: grout. For a successful batch of chalkboard paint, one to eight is the recommended ratio of grout to paint. So if you’re working on a small project involving only a half cup of paint, then expect to use one tablespoon of grout. Meanwhile, if you’re covering a large wall in a half gallon of paint, you’ll mix in a full cup of grout.

STEP 3
As thoroughly as you can, mix the grout into the paint. That means stirring for a minimum of five minutes, breaking up any clumps that start to form or stubbornly linger. Bear in mind that once you finish stirring, chalkboard paint tends to harden rather quickly, and you cannot seal the stuff for later use. In other words: Be ready to apply the paint as soon as you are done making it.

STEP 4
Apply the first coat, let it dry for several hours, then follow up with a second coat. After that, let the chalkboard paint dry for about three days, at which point the chalkboard should be cured and ready to use. Many people, however, suggest one last prep: conditioning the chalkboard by running a piece of writing chalk lengthwise over the surface until it’s completely covered. Finish by using a dry towel to wipe the chalked-over surface clean, and you’re all done!

It’s wonderful being able to make chalkboard paint yourself—quickly, cheaply, and easily—because there are so many exciting ways to use it, and you never know when inspiration will strike. Just go where the chalkboard muse takes you! Today, turn a kitchen cabinet into your family’s shopping list and reminder hub. This weekend, devote part of the garage to visualizing complicated auto repair and construction projects. Next month, put your work calendar up on the wall to accommodate your expanding business.


Bob Vila Radio: Linoleum Rugs

Do you remember linoleum rugs? At one time, they were hugely popular and today, they're a great, noncommittal way of participating in the comeback of this retro yet eco-friendly flooring material.

Linoleum rugs are a little-remembered footnote to floorcovering history. These days, unless you uncover one when you’re ripping up an old floor, you’re unlikely to find a linoleum rug outside of a vintage shop. But their half-century or so of popularity makes them worth a moment of consideration.

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Listen to BOB VILA ON LINOLEUM RUGS or read the text below:

Linoleum Rugs

Photo: hgtv.com

Introduced in the late 1800s, linoleum was first produced by coating a fabric, such as burlap or canvas, with a mixture of linseed oil, cork, resins and wood flour. The easy-care, resilient flooring was perfect for high-traffic areas—kitchens and hallways, for instance.

Although early linoleum was available primarily in solid colors, patterns became more sophisticated as production methods advanced. By the early 1900s, manufacturers began to offer linoleum rugs—essentially movable, highly patterned sheets of linoleum with decorative borders. They tended to mimic textiles—oriental rugs and intricate florals—but unlike their “real” counterparts, they could just be wiped clean.

By the 1950s, the rugs’ popularity began to wane as less expensive vinyl entered the market. Today, however, true linoleum is enjoying a comeback of sorts, thanks to its relative eco-friendliness and the advent of brighter colors suited to modern interiors. Some fabricators are even making linoleum rugs that unlike their predecessors, aren’t pretending to be something else, but instead celebrate what they are.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


How To: Clean a Dishwasher

It's tempting to think that your dishwasher gets a good cleaning every time you run it through a cycle, but that's unfortunately not the case. Here's how to keep it sparkling clean, sweet smelling, and effective.

How to Clean a Dishwasher - Open

Photo: shutterstock.com

The idea of cleaning a dishwasher may seem a bit strange at first, but think of it this way: You regularly maintain your vacuum, right? Well, the dishwasher isn’t dissimilar. Whereas accumulated dust and debris are what threaten the performance of your vacuum, food scraps, soap scum, and stubborn grease are what compromise your dishwasher. Even if you installed the unit pretty recently, you should know how to clean your dishwasher in order to maximize its efficiency.

MATERIALS
- 1 cup plain white vinegar (or unsweetened lemonade mix)
- 1 cup baking soda

How to Clean a Dishwasher - Interior

Photo: shutterstock.com

STEP 1
Detach the bottom rack so that you can access the dishwasher drain. Thoroughly examine this crucial area, removing any gunk or chunks you find, because they not only impede drainage but can also damage the appliance.

STEP 2
Fill a dishwasher-safe container with one cup of white vinegar, placing it on the upper rack of the otherwise empty machine. Close the door and run the dishwasher through a hot-water cycle. Once the vinegar has worked its magic, you should find that it has washed away grease and grime, and even removed any musty odors that may have been present. Note that you can use a package of unsweetened lemonade mix rather than vinegar to achieve the same result. Remember to stick with regular lemonade, though; flavored options can leave stains.

STEP 3
Now sprinkle a cupful of baking soda across the bottom of the appliance, then run it on a short hot-water cycle. When the cycle’s done, you should notice that your fresh-smelling dishwasher now boasts a brightened, stain-free interior.

OPTIONAL
Has your dishwasher suffered a vicious attack from nasty mold? If so, add a cup of bleach to the bottom of the basin, then run the machine on a full cycle—that is, unless the interior of your dishwasher contains stainless steel, in which case you should completely avoid the use of bleach (bleach and stainless steel are not friends).

 

Keeping Your Dishwasher Clean
Perhaps the best way to keep a dishwasher clean is to treat it with basic respect and consideration day in and day out—after all, the machine isn’t invincible. Observing a set of simple usage guidelines can help you wring the best possible performance from this workhorse appliance, even as you prolong its life span.

• The dishwasher shares a drain with the kitchen sink, so if you have a garbage disposal, run it before washing the dishes to ensure that the drain is clear.

• It’s smart to conserve electricity and water by running the dishwasher only when it’s full, but resist the temptation to pile dishes too high or too tightly.

• Don’t prewash dishes too thoroughly before adding them to the dishwasher. For detergent to do its job effectively, there needs to be a certain amount of grease and food residue present. Otherwise, the detergent simply creates foam during the wash cycle, and that excess can be detrimental to the appliance.


How To: Remove Paint from Wood

Sure, it's messy and time-consuming, but removing paint from wood can be an extremely satisfying project. Follow our tutorial, and you'll be stripping paint like a pro.

How to Remove Paint

Photo: shutterstock.com

It can be mighty labor-intensive and time-consuming to remove paint, which is why many do-it-yourselfers dread the task, even avoiding projects that involve stripping away layers of old paint. That’s a shame, given that the results are so often worth the effort. Fortunately, by following the simple steps outlined below, you can successfully remove paint with minimal aggravation and without causing damage to the wood in the course of the paint-stripping process.

MATERIALS AND TOOLS
- Protective gloves
- Safety glasses
- Respirator
- Solvent-based paint stripper
- Bucket
- Paintbrush
- Scraper
- Wire brush
- Rags
- Sandpaper

STEP 1
Remove all hardware (nails and screws, brackets and doorknobs) from the wood you are going to work on. If there are any nonremovable parts made of anything other than wood, cover them with protective tape. Before you begin work, put on the safety gear that’s essential to wear in the presence of chemical paint strippers—that means gloves, glasses, and a respirator. Having closely consulted the manufacturer’s instructions, pour your chosen solvent-based paint stripper into an empty bucket.

Note: Always observe the proper safety precautions when dealing with paint strippers and take care to select the right product. Because caustic strippers are capable of changing the color of wood, many experts recommend instead the use of solvent-based strippers. These are readily available online and in local hardware stores.

How to Remove Paint - Detail

Photo: shutterstock.com

STEP 2
Concentrating on one small section at a time, liberally apply the paint stripper with a paintbrush. Leave the product on the wood for about 20 minutes, or until the paint starts to bubble and peel. Bear in mind that if you are removing several layers of paint, it may be necessary to let the solvent sit for up to a few hours. As time elapses, test the paint intermittently to see whether it has softened to any noticeable degree.

STEP 3
Use a paint scraper to take off as much paint as possible from the area where you applied the stripper. Be gentle as you scrape; don’t gouge the wood. Once you’ve removed all you can with the scraper, you may choose to repeat the process, reapplying stripper and going through the steps once more. Once you’re satisfied with the condition of the area you’ve been stripping, move on to the next section.

STEP 4
After you have worked section by section removing all the paint from the flat portions of the wood, it’s time to address any raised or recessed areas (for example, moldings). Spread the stripper on the wood again and wait at least 20 minutes, but this time scrape with a wire brush that can access those hard-to-reach crests and depressions. Take care not to scrape too hard, which can leave scratches on the wood.

STEP 5
Wash the wood with a clean, water-soaked rag, then sand down the entire surface. If you have access to a power sander, you can use it to make quicker work of sanding the broad, flat sections, but you should still manually sand any fragile or carved parts of the piece. Finally, wipe the wood free of dust and debris, and that’s it! You’re done.