Category: Doors & Windows


Bob Vila Radio: For Brighter Interiors, Clean Your Storm Windows

Storm windows give protection and increased efficiency to older windows, but with their exposure to the elements, they gradually become streaked and foggy. This year, take the time to clean your storm windows, and you may be surprised by the difference it makes.

These days, a lot of folks are feeling the chill in the air and are beginning to button up their homes for the winter. If you have an older home with wood or aluminum storm windows and want to enjoy the crisp light of the season, your fall to-do list should include the task removing and cleaning those storms.

How to Clean Storm Windows

Photo: whatarestormwindows.com

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Listen to BOB VILA ON CLEANING STORM WINDOWS or read the text below:

Do the job from inside the house, removing each panel that’s nearest you. If it’s a triple-track storm window, start by lowering the screen nearly to the bottom of its track, pressing inward on the spring-loaded tabs at the bottom of the screen. Then, holding the tabs inward, wiggle the screen a little, pushing up slightly on one side, to pull the screen toward you and out of its track. Repeat the process on the glazed sash, again working with the track nearest you. Be sure to note which windows and screens go where, since you’ll need to replace them as they were after you’ve given them a good cleaning.

If yours are wood storm windows, either fixed or operable, removing the windows for cleaning may be overly laborious or simply not possible, depending on circumstances. Clean these windows from the outside. You’ll be surprised by what a difference it makes!

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 60 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


Is Now the Time to Replace Your Front Door?

Swap out your current front door in favor of one that not only looks better from the curb, but also functions better day to day.

Photo: pella.com

Everyone knows the importance of making a good first impression. Yes, that’s advice for first dates and job interviews, but it also applies to home design and remodeling. And while curb appeal depends on many factors—landscaping and siding, lighting and lawn care—the front door, the focal point of the facade, trumps the others in terms of importance. It also has essential daily functions to perform, keeping out the weather and intruders, while also resisting more wear and tear than most other components are subject to. Despite its prominence, we rarely think twice about the entryway. Perhaps it’s time that we gave it our full attention.

Properly maintained, a quality door can last for decades, but there comes a time when it makes more sense to replace it than to repair it. If you’re trying to figure out whether or not that time has come for your entryway, take a close look and ask yourself the following questions:

• Is your front door weathered, scratched, or dented?
• Are there cracks or breaks along the door’s edges or within its panels?
• Does the door let in drafts?
• Have you encountered difficulty getting the door to hang level on its hinges?
• Is it often a hassle to close and lock the door?

If you answered yes to any of the above questions, then it may be wise to consider front door replacement. Think about not only the problems that exist with your current entryway, but also the advantages to be gained from putting in a new one—improved appearance, energy efficiency, security, ease of operation and more. Best of all, research suggests that when you move out, you are very likely to recoup most of what you spend on a new door. According to the Remodeling magazine 2014 Cost vs. Value Report, front door replacement ranks as the single most cost-effective home upgrade, returning more than 95% of the investment!

Photo: pella.com

Of course, deciding to replace the front door isn’t the only choice to be made. Exterior doors differ in size, architectural style, and accessories. They also differ in material, and for many homeowners, differentiating between wood, fiberglass, and steel often ends up being the most challenging part of the process. Selecting one is a matter of your budget, and of weighing the pros and cons of each material. Here’s what to know:

Heavy in feel and inviting to look at, wood doors are generally the most traditional, often including rich details and decorative, light-admitting glass inserts. Typically, they’re most at home in heritage house styles (e.g., Craftsman, Colonial, and Victorian), but since they are available in such a wide assortment of finishes, you can bet there’s a wood door out there that would work perfectly as the portal to your place.

Fiberglass doors are significantly more affordable than wood, but equally appealing to homeowners are their low maintenance requirements. And while wood doors last a long time, fiberglass doors are also quite durable, being resistant to dents and cracks, rot and rust. You can get them in a virtually any finish you can think of, which means that no matter what sort of house you live in, fiberglass remains a top option.

Now if security is the main thing you want, nothing beats steel doors. These are the strongest of all, deterring not only intruders but also fire and moisture degradation. Often forgotten, too, is that most steel doors contain an insulating foam core, which means they excel in energy efficiency. Pre-primed, steel doors can be finished with any exterior paint in the color that best complements the outside of your home.

Once you’ve chosen a material, there are plenty of ways you can customize your chosen front door. For instance, there are glazing options, such as glass inserts, sidelights, and transoms. And there also countless styles and finishes available in hardware—door knobs, handles, and lock sets. To see a comprehensive collection of all the different looks you can achieve in your entryway, visit the Pella Photo Gallery.

This post has been brought to you by Pella. Its facts and opinions are those of BobVila.com.


The Right Way to Weatherstrip a Door

Besides being unpleasant, door drafts force your heating system to work harder (and consume more energy) to keep your home at a consistently comfortable temperature. You can go a long way toward solving the issue by weatherstripping your doors. Here's how to do it the right way.

Door Weather Stripping

Photo: montpelierrestoration.wordpress.com

Door drafts can be a cause of real discomfort. Besides the immediate unpleasantness of a chilly gust invading the warmth of your home in winter, there’s also the impact that drafts can have on your energy bills. That’s where weatherstripping comes in. According to Energy Star, the installation of weatherstripping can save you up to 20 percent on heating and cooling costs. Best of all, virtually anyone can install weatherstripping; this is definitely not a sophisticated DIY. But to coax the greatest value from its insulating properties, weatherstripping must be installed correctly. Continue reading to learn the right way to go about the project.

STEP 1
First, clean the door and the jamb, removing as much dirt and debris as possible. If any grime remains after scrubbing with soapy water, consider using fine-grit sandpaper to eliminate residual buildup. Once you’ve got the doorway clean, proceed to do some measuring. You need to answer two questions. First, how wide is the gap between the door and jamb? (Be sure to measure twice, once along the side, and again along the top. These measurements might differ.) Second, how wide is the jamb? While the answer to the first question tells you how thick the weatherstripping you purchase can be, the second answer reveals how widePlan on buying enough weatherstripping to run across the width and height of the door, plus about 10 percent extra (just in case).

Door Weather Stripping - Install Detail

Photo: dulley.com

STEP 2
Weatherstripping comes in a variety of materials. Each has pros and cons. Felt weatherstripping offers the benefits of being cheap and very easy to cut and install, but because it’s not very durable, it’s best confined to rarely used doors. Marginally more expensive is easy-to-install foam weatherstripping. Though foam wears better than felt, neither boasts the durability of rubber, the most expensive option. Rubber insulates well, but it can be somewhat challenging to install. Unlike the other options, it often must be nailed into place.

STEP 3
With your chosen weatherstripping at the ready, proceed to cut three pieces—one for the top, and two for the sides. If the product features an adhesive back, peel it away and press it into place around the perimeter of the door jamb, not the door itself. Even if your weatherstripping has adhesive, you may wish to reinforce the installation with heavy-duty staples or small tacking nails. Either will help keep the weatherstripping in place over time.

STEP 4
To complete the job, install a sweep along the bottom of the door. The most common type of door sweep consists of a metal band from which a strip of rubber juts down. When the door opens, the rubber flexes so as not to be an impediment, and when the door closes, the rubber provides a strong air seal.

Door sweeps come in standard sizes, but if you cannot find one whose width matches that of your door, you can use a hacksaw to cut the sweep down to size. Attach the right-size sweep to the door using the screws provided. Because these screws tend to be small and not self-tapping, it’s best to predrill holes for them by means of an electric drill/driver. Position the sweep so that it seals tightly against the threshold.

From start to finish, the door weatherstripping process should take no longer than an hour. That’s a small time commitment to ensure that you remain comfortable through the winter, without spending a fortune on to keep the house warm. Though it’s a simple project, weatherstripping really is one of the most effective ways to stop drafts and the discomfort they cause.

 


How To: Install a Deadbolt

The easiest and cheapest way to improve the security of your home is to install a deadbolt. With the right tools, even the average homeowner can get the job done with relative ease. Here's how.

How to Install a Deadbolt

Photo: shutterstock.com

Automated security systems are nice to have, but the easiest and least expensive way to improve the security of home is to install a deadbolt lock. Even a high-quality lockset isn’t enough to keep out an experienced burglar; you’re a lot better off with both a lockset and a deadbolt. Since you really do get what you pay for, it’s best not to scrimp here. You’ll save on installation, because it’s so easy to install a deadbolt, you can do the job yourself within a couple hours. Here’s how.

MATERIALS AND TOOLS:
- Deadbolt
- Drill/driver
- Phillips-head screwdriver
- Tape measure
- Speed square
- 1″ chisel
- Marking pencil
- 2-1/8″ hole saw
- 1″ spade bit

STEP 1
Determine the ideal location for the deadbolt. Typically, a deadbolt lock appears 6″ or 12″ inches above the key lock (roughly 44″ from the bottom of the door). With help from your tape measure, pick your spot and mark it on the side of the door (the part through which the bolt is going to extend). Now break out your speed square and pencil a straight line at the mark point; it should extend all the way across the door’s side. Next, again use the speed square, this time to help you continue that line onto the front and back sides of the door. You should end up with a single line that runs continuously, at uniform height, around the door.

How to Install a Deadbolt - Drilling Door

Photo: shutterstock.com

STEP 2
On each side of the door, mark the point 2-3/8″ or 2-3/4″ from the edge (the measurement depends on the length of your latch bolt; for specifics here, refer to the template provided by the manufacturer of your chosen lock). Meanwhile, on the edge of the door, mark the midpoint. The three marks you’ve made represent where you’re going to drill. First up is the hole for the lock cylinder. Having attached the 2-1/8″ hole saw to your drill, address the mark on the front of door. Rather than drill all the way through, go about an inch deep, then move over and drill through the other side. The result should be a clean, circular hole through which you can easily see the other side. Finish with the 1″ spade bit; drill through the marked point on the side of the door, continuing until this hole meets the other.

STEP 3
Choose the faceplate from among the lock parts supplied with your purchase. Match the hole in the faceplate with the hole you drilled on the door’s edge. While holding the plate in position, trace around it with your pencil, marking its silhouette. Having done so, use a 1″ chisel to create a 1/8″-deep mortise within the tracing. The faceplate and bolt are likely attached, so you must install both simultaneously. After confirming which is right side-up for the bolt, slide the bolt through the latch hole, bringing the faceplate flush with the edge of the door (assuming you’ve mortised correctly). Secure the plate with the mounting screws provided before moving onto the key cylinder. When sliding the cylinder into place through the larger hole on the face of the door, be sure to fit the tailpiece of the cylinder through the corresponding holes on the bolt. Once it’s correctly positioned, screw the cylinder onto the door. Then repeat with the other half of the cylinder: Slide it into the door, join it to the bolt, then screw it in.

STEP 4
The hard part is over. After locking and unlocking the mechanism a few times to test its functionality, activate the bolt and shut the door as far as it will go. On the doorjamb, mark the point where the bolt hits. Here, using the 1″ spade bit, drill a hole to accept the bolt. Now look over to the unused lock parts you have left; the strike plate should be among the last remaining. Fit it over the hole, then trace around it with your pencil. As you did for the faceplate in step 3, proceed to chisel out a 1/8″-deep mortise. Once finished, set the strike plate into the mortise, making it flush with the jamb, then secure it in place with screws.

Test the door to be certain that it’s working properly. Assuming it is, you can now rest easier, knowing the average burglar would have a much, much harder time gaining entry to your most valuable investment—your home.


Bob Vila Radio: Fast Fixes for Sticky Double-Hung Windows

Do you work up a sweat wrestling with sticking windows? These time-tested tricks can help you get those slashes sliding freely up and down again.

Sure, you love your old wooden double-hung windows. But sometimes—after raising and lowering them—do you feel like you need a visit to the chiropractor? Here are some tips for freeing up those sticking windows.

Sticking Windows

Photo: shutterstock.com

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Listen to BOB VILA ON STICKING WINDOWS, or read text below:

First, if the windows have been painted shut, use a hammer and stiff putty knife (with a blade at least 4″ wide) to work your way between the window sash and the moldings. Holding the putty knife parallel with the glass, gently tap the corner of the blade between the molding and the sash. Once you have the blade partly in, wiggle it around to loosen the paint. Repeat the process around any areas of the sash where it appears there could be binding.

You can also try using a hammer to drive a block of wood into the window tracks, as near to the sash as you can. The wood should be about 1/8″ wider than the tracks. The idea is to spread the tracks just enough to ease the binding. Finally, rub a little candle wax into the tracks. That’ll help keep those sashes sliding!

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 60 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


What Would Bob Do? Repairing a Door That Sticks

Wood doors can be sticky, but the repair doesn't need to be. If your doors have been a little temperamental lately, try one of these fixes to get them opening freely again.

Photo: shutterstock.com

In my house, several of our wood doors keep sticking. I’ve tried candle wax and have made sure all the screws in the door frame are tight, but the doors are still sticking. Any advice on how to fix a sticking door would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

How to Fix a Sticking Door - Panel

Photo: shutterstock.com

In a situation like this, sometimes the door itself is to blame. Over time, joints in a wood door relax, causing the construction to sag and stick against the jamb. A more common cause is a hinge or strike plate that has become loose. But you’ve mentioned that the screws are tight, presumably in both the door and the jamb. So, although failing hardware is typically the first thing to check when a door is sticking, that doesn’t seem to be the cause of your predicament.

I’d speculate that humidity is the issue. Doors usually stick in summer, when relative humidity is high. The moisture expands the wood, making your doors too tight in their frames. In the winter, humidity levels are usually lower, because cooler air cannot hold as much moisture. If you have better luck with these doors in the cooler months, it’s simply because environmental factors are not causing them to swell.

What you should do is buy a hygrometer and take a reading of the relative humidity indoors. Common causes of high humidity include wet basements and improper use of the bathroom or kitchen vents when bathing or cooking, respectively. If you happen to have a lot of houseplants, that too might add to the humidity, particularly in combination with other factors. So check the hygrometer reading, and if the reading comes in at over 70 percent, there’s your explanation. Get the humidity down, and you’re likely to find that those annoying doors finally unstick on their own.

If getting the humidity down isn’t in the cards, then you can always trim down the door panel. Concentrate on the problem edge, the one that rubs against the jamb; you can usually identify it by the worn finish. Ultimately, the space left between the door and jamb should be about 1/8 inch wide, or roughly the thickness of a nickel. Follow these steps:

• As a test, open and close the door with the aim of identifying the precise area where the problem’s occurring. Use a sharp pencil or carpenter’s compass to scribe the panel where it rubs against the side or top of the jamb. Having drawn a line on the door, proceed to take it off the hinges and carry it somewhere you feel comfortable kicking up a little sawdust.

• Next, use a hand plane, power planer, or belt sander to shave off the excess material. Remove only the minimum required for the door to close. (When the panel shrinks in winter, you don’t want there to be a big gap between the door and jamb.) Now put the door back into place and check the fit. A certain amount of trial and error is almost inevitable with this task, even for people who’ve done it before. You may need to remove the door again in order to sand off a little more. Keep at it until you’re satisfied.

• Once the door fits well and you’ve managed to achieve an approximately 1/8-inch reveal, you’re ready to refinish the part of the door that you’ve planed. You can either remove the door or finish it in place, but time is of the essence. The door wants to swell up again; refinishing limits its capacity to do so.

If the humidity is under control and you’ve already tried trimming your doors, then it’s possible you’re seeing a symptom of foundation settlement. Unfortunately, foundation problems are not DIY-friendly repairs. Consult with a foundation repair specialist. Fair warning: Foundation repair work is rarely cheap, but it’s in your best interest to understand precisely what problems, besides sticking doors, your foundation may bring about in the future.


Bob Vila Radio: Screen Repair Made Simple

Holes in window or door screens are not only unsightly, but they also invite flying insects into your home. Fortunately, it's a simple fix, whether your screens are metal or fiberglass. Read on to learn how it's done.

Ever notice how pesky bugs manage to find their way through even the tiniest holes in your screens?

How to Fix a Window Screen

Photo: shutterstock.com

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Listen to BOB VILA ON SCREEN REPAIR or read the text below:

No need to fret. Repairing the little holes is easy, especially if you catch them before they grow into big holes.

For metal screens, make a patch (using the same screening material) that’s about an inch larger than the hole. Next, unravel about a half inch of fringe around the edge of the patch and bend it at a right angle. Place the patch on the hole, push through the fringe wires, then bend them back to secure the patch.

For fiberglass screens, push the fibers of the screen back toward the middle of the hole, then apply a bit of clear nail polish to bond the fibers together.

For larger holes, head to the hardware store and pick up a self-adhesive patch that’s a snap to apply.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


The Economical, Environmental, and Emotional Benefits of Tubular Skylights

Rooms filled with natural daylight offer many benefits to your health, mood, and pocketbook. Learn how today's tubular skylights are bringing light to almost every room of the house.

Solatube Daylighting Skylights

Photo: Solatube International

There’s no substitute for natural light. In comparison with the artificial variety, it’s better for your health, the environment, and your electric bill. So figuring out how to get more daylight into your home is a worthwhile endeavor, to say the least. For rooms with an exterior wall, the solution is simple—add a window. For interior spaces where windows aren’t an option, tubular skylights are a smart alternative.

Unlike traditional skylights, which require a direct line of sight from the roof to the light-deprived room below, tubular skylights can deliver natural daylight easily to virtually any area of the house. Factor in the economical, environmental, and emotional benefits they offer, and it’s not hard to see why tubular skylights have become a popular choice for a multitude of today’s residential and commercial daylighting applications.

What are tubular skylights?
Tubular skylights, also known as “solar tubes,” “sun pipes,” “light tunnels,” and “tubular daylighting devices,” typically use a rooftop dome to capture the sun’s rays and then transfer the light indoors through a highly reflective tube. The modular design allows them to be customized to whatever length may be required—up to as much as 40 feet in some cases. Because the tube itself is compact and available in adjustable and flexible designs, it can be configured easily to avoid attic obstructions for fast installation. The result is a more versatile skylight that can carry natural light into interior spaces where traditional skylights and windows can’t reach, spaces like closets, bathrooms, and hallways, to name just a few.

Solatube Daylightig Diagram

Photo: Solatube International

Economic Benefits
One obvious cost-saving benefit of installing a tubular skylight is that daylight is free. Once the device is installed, your dependence on electricity is reduced, and so is your utility bill. Tubular daylighting devices, like those from Solatube International, Inc., are also more affordable and less costly to install than traditional skylights. In most cases, they can be installed in a matter of hours, requiring no construction, drywall, or repainting. Solatube Daylighting Devices are designed with a patented light-capturing dome that redirects low-angle sunlight and rejects overpowering midday summer sun. They also minimize heat gain and loss for added savings on heating and cooling.

Environmental Benefits
Skylights harness one of our most coveted natural and sustainable resources—light from the sun. So putting them to work at home not only lessens reliance on electricity, but also reduces energy consumption from power plants. When we consume less, we conserve more natural resources and help limit greenhouse-damaging gas emissions—a win for us and the planet. For added earth-friendly benefits, Solatube’s manufacturing plant recycles its excess production materials, making their products both clean and green.

Solatube Daylighting System

Photo: Solatube International

Emotional Benefits
It’s no secret that natural light, or the lack thereof, affects us on a physiological level. Consider the existence of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a state of depression that can occur when one doesn’t get enough exposure to the sun. Sunlight plays an important role as a mood elevator by triggering the production of serotonin. It is also a key contributor of heart-protecting vitamin D. And it helps regulate circadian rhythms, which contributes to healthier sleep cycles. Sunlight also heightens energy levels and concentration, making you more productive and naturally alert. In short, daylight is a staple of our existence that we rely on for emotional balance.

In addition to the many economical, environmental, and emotional benefits of tubular skylights, Solatube has created an innovative hybrid that combines daylighting with LEDs. When there’s plenty of sunlight, the Smart LED System delivers natural light. At night, energy-efficient LEDs automatically turn on. The result is a seamless blending of natural and LED light throughout the day and night so that you’re never kept in the dark.

 

This article is sponsored on behalf of Solatube International, Inc. Its facts and opinions are those of BobVila.com


What Would Bob Do? Installing a Screen Door

A screen door is a great thing to have. It lets in cooling breezes in the summer and protects your front door from harsh weather in the winter. If you're in the market for a new screen door, or just want to replace the one you have, here are some tips on purchasing the right door for your house.

How to Install a Screen Door

Photo: smithandvansant.com

I’m going to install a new screen door. Any advice or time-saving suggestions on how to go about it?

It’s relatively easy to install a screen door, but to avoid hassles it’s imperative that you choose the right kit (these are commonly sold at brick-and-mortar home centers as well as through online suppliers). But of all the many screen door kits on the market, how do you know which one is right for your home?

For one thing, the screen door must be the right size. If you are putting in a screen door where there wasn’t one before, you must start by determining the dimensions of the door opening. Measure the width and height of the space within the door trim; do so at a few different points along each side (chances are things are not perfectly level or plumb). Now select the standard door size that corresponds most closely to the smallest width and height measurements that you took. If there’s only a small deviation between the opening and the nearest standard door size, filler strips can help you achieve a snug fit. If, however, the door opening is 3/8 inch wider than the nearest standard width, or if it’s more than 7/8 inch taller than the standard height, you are going to need a custom door.

How to Install a Screen Door - Detail Door

Photo: maplestone.biz

If, on the other hand, you are installing a new screen door to take the place of an older one, there’s much less measuring to do. Confirm the dimensions of the door you’re replacing so that you know what size door you need to buy. Also, note the locations of the hinges on the existing door. If the latch is on the right side and the hinges are on the left (when you’re looking at the door from the outside), that means you have a right-hand door, also called a right-swinging door. The opposite, of course, is a left-hand door. Your new screen door should match not only the size, but also the door-swing direction of the panel you are replacing.

I highly recommend opting for a screen door that comes preassembled. Installing these novice-friendly designs requires only basic tools and a minimal investment of time. The popular manufacturer Andersen, for example, estimates it would take the average do-it-yourselfer in the ballpark of one hour to install its “rapid-install” series 3000 preassembled models.

Here’s another tip to help you save time: Choose what’s known as a self-storing door. These designs greatly simplify the twice-a-year task of exchanging the screen for a glass panel and vice versa. In the manner of a triple-track storm window, the door integrates both screen and glass panels; you can easily slide one or the other into use as the season requires.


Tubular Skylights: Natural Daylight Where You Least Expect It

While windows provide natural light to many of the rooms in your house, there are still others shuttered in darkness. With the advent of tubular skylight technology, you can now easily add daylighting to just about any area of your home.

solatube light-diffusers-natural-lighting

Photo: Solatube International

Every room benefits from natural daylight.  The living room becomes more inviting and comfortable, the kitchen more suitable for cooking, dining and entertaining, the family room infinitely more enjoyable, and the bedroom and bath—light-filled sanctuaries and retreats.  But what about the interior rooms and areas of your home that don’t have the benefit of even a single window: hallways, laundry rooms, stairwells, bathrooms and closets?  The fact is, up until recently there was very little you could do short of flipping a light switch. Today, there are tubular skylights to bring natural light to just about any area of the house.

Solatube Daylighting

Illustration: Solatube International

Tubular skylights, also known as solar tubes, light tunnels, daylighting systems, are affordable, high-performance lighting solutions that bring daylight into interior spaces where traditional skylights and windows simply can’t be installed.  Using a rooftop dome to capture the sun’s rays, a highly reflective tube transfers the light indoors where it is dispersed through a ceiling mounted diffuser.

Unlike traditional skylights that need direct line of sight, tubular devices can be configured easily to avoid attic obstructions and deliver the light where it is needed—in some cases, as much as up to 40 feet with products from Solatube Interational, Inc. Since the tube itself is compact and, depending on manufacturer, available in rigid, adjustable and flexible designs, it is also more affordable and less labor-intensive to install. That means areas lacking natural daylight today can be flooded with light tomorrow—actually within a couple of hours for Solatube Daylighting Systems.  And, since natural light reduces the dependency on electric, installing a tubular skylight also results in energy savings.

So, where can you benefit from more natural light?

CLOSETS
In addition to never being quite large enough, closets are intentionally made without windows, making the hunt for the right shirt, pants, shoes and belt more challenging.  Even with electric lighting, the true colors can be visually altered, making your navies look black and maroons look burgundy. The Solatube Daylighting System produces perfect color rendition so you can see with more clarity and accuracy.

solatube_03

Photo: Solatube International

LAUNDRY ROOMS
While laundry rooms are no longer relegated to the basement or mudroom, they are still often tucked into small, windowless areas of the home—from the kitchen pantry to the upstairs hall closet. Dim conditions not only make it difficult to perform necessary laundry tasks, but make the job that much more undesirable.  Bright, natural light from a tubular skylight will not only make sorting, folding, treating stains, and pairing random socks easier, it will make the room feel less cramped.

HALLWAYS
Despite being well-traveled passages, hallways are notorious for being dimly lit. If you have a narrow hallway with no natural light, you probably find yourself flipping on your electric lights frequently—even during the day. With a well-placed Solatube Daylighting System, bright, natural light can be delivered easily to hallway interiors. And, since the device is designed with a patented, light-capturing rooftop dome that redirects low-angle sunlight and rejects overpowering midday summer sun, you can also be assured of consistent natural illumination throughout the day.

STAIRWELLS
Stairwells that lack adequate lighting can be dark and dangerous. Tripping on a step or missing a handhold on the railing can lead to serious falls. Depending on its location and design, you could also be missing an opportunity to highlight one of the most interesting architectural features in your home. A tubular skylight can flood the space with natural daylight, dramatically improving visibility and appearance.

BATHROOMS

Res_Daylighting_Hero1_3

Photo: Solatube International

If you have an interior bathroom with no access to windows, you already know the issues it presents—and the dependency on electricity it requires.  In the bath, tubular skylights not only provide a smart daylighting solution, they can be outfitted with a variety of flat-, recessed-, and decorative-mount ceiling fixtures, as well as warming and softening lenses, ventilation, dimmers and occupancy sensors.

Of course, tubular skylights, like traditional skylights, do share one problem. When night falls or clouds pass overhead, the light disappears or fades. Solatube International, a leading manufacturer and innovator of daylighting products, offers an inventive solution with their Smart LED technology. When there’s plenty of sunlight, the tube delivers natural light. Too much light, an optional motorized baffle dims the output. At night, energy-efficient LEDs automatically turn on. The result, a seamless—and energy efficient—blending of natural and LED light throughout the day and night.

 

This post is sponsored on behalf of Solatube International.  Its facts and opinions are those of BobVila.com