Category: Lawn & Garden


Bob Vila Radio: Help Your Lawn Thrive This Sweltering Summer

Here's how you can help your lawn rise to the challenge of not only surviving the summer, but thriving despite the heat and drought conditions.

Summertime is great for beaches, boating, and barbecues. But it’s not so great for turf grasses. They tend to take a beating in hot, dry weather. Here are some ways you can help your lawn get through the stressful summer months.

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Listen to BOB VILA ON HOT WEATHER LAWN CARE, or read text below:

First, water wisely. Treating your turf to thorough soakings, spaced a couple days apart, is better than light, daily sprinklings. Most lawns do best on at least an inch of water per week (more, if temperatures are really soaring).

Use a rain gauge—or just a short, empty can—to help keep track of  how much you’re watering. Cut your grass often, but not too short. It’s best to raise your mower blade, so you’re trimming your turf at about three inches high. That’ll encourage healthy root growth.

One other tip: Make sure your mower blade is sharp. That way you’ll be cutting the grass cleanly rather than shredding it. Shredding is an extra stress your turf doesn’t need, especially this time of year!

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 60 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


Bob Vila Radio: How to Relocate a Young Tree

You're having second thoughts about the placement of a sapling. No worries. So long as it's still relatively small, you can move a tree to a new spot on your property. Here's how.

Ever come to the frustrating conclusion that you’ve planted a young tree in exactly the wrong place? Here are some tips on how to move it without losing it.

How to Move a Tree

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Listen to BOB VILA ON RELOCATING A TREE or read the text below:

Prep the new location first. The hole should be about twice the width of the root ball. Depth should be about grade level. As you’re digging out the bottom of the hole, you’ll want to resist the urge to loosen the soil. Loose soil can cause the tree to sink too low over time, and that can lead to rotting.

Next, remove the tree by starting with your shovel about three feet from the trunk. If you have to cut roots, use sharp pruners. When you’ve managed to get the root ball loose, hoist the tree up onto a tarp and drag it to the new location.

Lower the tree into the new hole and gradually add soil and water. Create a wide berm around the tree and add a couple inches of mulch. Then get your hose going. The tree will need plenty of water until it’s settled into the new spot.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


Transform and Protect Your Deck in a Single Coat

Improving the looks and longevity of your wood deck has never been easier for the weekend do-it-yourselfer, thanks to a new product from Thompson's WaterSeal.

Thompsons Waterproofing Stain - Finished Deck

Photo: thompsonswaterseal.com

Your deck was no small investment: If you haven’t been taking good care of it, now’s the time to give your deck the care it needs to look great and last long. If exposure to the elements has caused your deck to turn gray or acquire mildew, or if the boards have begun to crack and split, you’re in luck. A new Waterproofing Stain from industry leader Thompson’s WaterSeal can not only protect your deck from further damage, but also add rich, beautiful color.

Thompsons Waterproofing Stain - Finishing Process

Photo: thompsonswaterseal.com

It’s a one-step product. That means a single coat provides the superior waterproofing for which Thompson’s WaterSeal is known, along with a stain to transform the appearance of your deck. Choose from five popular colors: Acorn Brown, Harvest Gold, Maple Brown, Sequoia Red or Woodland Cedar. Then select your preferred level of opacity—transparent, semi-transparent, or solid. Stains with more pigment will last longer, but show less of the natural wood grain. Transparent stain is guaranteed for three years, semi-transparent stain is guaranteed for four years, and the solid stain is guaranteed for five years.

Preparation and application are easy. Clean the deck thoroughly first. A ready-to-use deck cleaner makes this step pretty painless. Simply apply the cleaner, allow it to work for about 10 or 15 minutes, then scrub and rinse. Normally, you’d need to wait for the deck to dry out completely, but not with this product.

The next step is to measure the square footage of your deck. That determines how many gallons of stain are required (each gallon covers up to 400 square feet). You can buy it and be on your way. Thanks to its pigment-suspension technology, there’s no need to wait for the Waterpoofing Stain to have its turn in the paint shaker. Open up the can on any day with a temperature between 50 and 90 degrees, and the finish is ready to for application via brush, roller, or pad.

If you’ve ever painted outdoors before, you know that clean-up can be a hassle, but that’s not the case here. The Waterproofing Stain is latex-based, which means it washes off with nothing more than soap and water. Drying time for the stain varies depending on the weather. But in normal conditions, it takes only a couple of hours. Leave it overnight, and the next day your deck will appear as though brand-new, and it will be totally ready for you to start enjoying it!

This post has been brought to you by Thompson’s Waterseal. Its facts and opinions are those of BobVila.com.


Weekend Projects: 5 Creative Ways to Build a Garden Trellis

In the backyard, a simple (or simply brilliant) DIY trellis provides visual interest at eye level, while serving as scaffolding for plants that love to go vertical.

You can buy a trellis, sure—but where’s the fun in that? With no sacrifice in function, a unique DIY trellis separates your garden from the others on your block. And you get to choose the design, customizing the structure to your exact specifications. From free-standing trellises to ones that integrate with the house, there are countless projects, ranging from sophisticated woodworking to quick and easy repurposing. Scroll down to see five of our favorite ways to create a DIY trellis.

 

1. BREAK WITH TRADITION

DIY Trellis - Chevron

Photo: smileandwave.typepad.com

Foregoing the traditional square pattern, Rachel at Smile and Wave based her DIY trellis on a chevron pattern that zigzags across five tall stakes. The diagonal members are actually repurposed wood shims, each cut with a hack saw and nailed into place. To finish, Rachel painted the trellis a crisp, eye-catching white.

 

2. TURN THE CORNER

DIY Trellis - Corner

Photo: especiallycreativebroad.wordpress.com

Defy gravity with a DIY trellis modeled on this wonderful construction from Especially Creative Broad. It goes up and over the garage door, not only providing ample room for climbing plants to thrive, but also adding decorative detail to a primarily utilitarian and typically characterless part of the home.

 

3. REWORK A RACK

DIY Trellis - Painted

Photo: sybilalfano.com

Artist Sybil Alfano found the perfect way to grow vines in a container. It starts with an inexpensive accordion-style peg rack. Next, embellish the rack with a series of pencils, both to disguise the original purpose of the rack and to lend more support to climbing plants. Finally, paint the DIY trellis in a bold color of your choice.

 

4. STUDY STRING THEORY

Photo: fortheloveofskinny.com

For this unconventional DIY trellis, courtesy of Morgan at For the Love of Skinny, you need only a handful of materials: two bike tires, gardening string, a threaded metal rod and matching nuts. While the tire spokes add decorative flair, the string guides the growth of plants upward—in this case, sweet peas.

 

5. EAMES MADE EASY

Photo: JoAnn Moser, curbly.com

Inspired by the work of Charles and Ray Eames—in particular, a color-studded coat rack the couple designed and made world-famous—this DIY trellis project (from the good folks at Curbly) lets you take your love of modernism into the backyard. If you were seeking out a summery woodworking project, look no further!


Bob Vila Radio: Planting Ground Cover

For all of its rewards, lawn maintenance can become a loathsome chore. If you're sick and tired of mowing and watering, why not ditch the grass and plant ground covers instead?

If you’ve grown a bit weary of spending your weekends wedded to your lawn mower, perhaps it’s time to replace some of your sod with low-maintenance ground covers.

How to Plant Ground Cover

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Listen to BOB VILA ON GROUND COVERS or read the text below:

Here’s what you’ll need to do: First, use a rototiller or a sod-stripping machine to clear your intended plot of grass and weeds. Next, water the area, then cover it with clear plastic for several weeks. The sun will heat the soil and boost its potential to support the new plants.

Once you’ve removed the plastic, cover the area again, this time with a water-permeable landscaping fabric to discourage weeds. Cut small holes in the fabric, fold back the flaps, and plant your plants.

There are literally hundreds of plant varieties that work well as ground covers. They spread quickly, need little  maintenance, are drought-resistant and lend an elegant touch to your landscaping. As you would with any other landscaping effort, keep the climate in mind when you’re choosing what to plant.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


Weekend Projects: 5 Summery DIY Porch Swings

I’m not sure, I haven’t researched it, but sitting—no, swaying—on a porch swing might be the most relaxing of all the ways a person could spend a summer afternoon. Of course, there’s a big difference between enjoying a porch swing and actually (successfully) building one. In fact, the work involved in making a DIY porch swing probably sounds to you like the very antithesis of relaxation. But though the prospect may at first seem daunting, it’s more than attainable. Scroll down now to see five DIY porch swings, any of which could be a permanent fixture of your outdoor living area before the sun rises on Monday morning.

 

1. SWING SIMPLY

Photo: shanty-2-chic.com

Compact in size and elegantly simple in shape, a no-frills modern look characterizes this stylish DIY porch swing. It’s built almost entirely of 2×4 and 1×6 lumber, so if you have intermediate woodworking experience, go ahead and set up your saw. Then visit Shanty 2 Chic for clear and simple step-by-step project directions.

 

2. HANG OUT

Photo: abeautifulmess.com

A couple yards of canvas, a length of polypropylene rope, and a wooden dowel all combine to create a unique hammock swing. Install yours indoors or out. Though sewing is required, you can most definitely complete the project within the space of a weekend, even if you’re a novice when it comes to needle and thread.

 

3. DREAM OF DAYBEDS 

Photo: club.conservationgardenpark.org

Large enough to accommodate a twin-size mattress, this oversized DIY porch swing might more accurately be described as a hanging daybed—hat luxury! To be certain the bed remains safely suspended, and that you don’t tip over once you climb in, be sure to hang something like this from four (sturdy) points, not two.

 

4. HACK A HEADBOARD

Photo: therusticpig.com

If you’re looking forward to catching some Z’s on your new porch swing, there would be a certain poetic justice to repurposing a headboard as part of the swing’s construction. Don’t have an extra headboard in your attic or basement? Try your local thrift store. Once you’ve got one, see The Rustic Pig for all the DIY details.

 

5. RESTORE A DOOR 

Photo: huckleberrylanefurniture.blogspot.com

From Huckleberry Lane Furniture, here’s a DIY porch swing involving an old door and the remnants of a falling-apart antique table. It goes to show that scrap wood comes in many forms and that, for a functional and beautiful result, money spent at your local lumber yard is by no means a prerequisite.


INFOGRAPHIC: Your Quick & Easy Guide to a Lush Lawn

Lawn care can drive a person crazy during these dog days of summer, but using these pointers, you can say goodbye to scruffy, brown grass!

Remember that old saying, “The grass is greener on the other side”? Not true. You can get the lawn of your dreams. The key is to adopt a routine that promotes healthy grass, while identifying and addressing the gnarliest threats (we’re looking at you, dandelions and crabgrass). Don’t let the frustrations of lawn care ruin your summer. Follow these tips and by the time Labor Day rolls around, your front lawn just might have become the envy of your neighborhood.

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Bob Vila Radio: Battery-Powered Lawn Mowers

In the market for a new lawn mower? If you're wondering whether a battery-powered model would be right for your property, these pros and cons can help you decide once and for all.

With the cost of gasoline continuing to rise, battery-powered lawn mowers have been getting a lot of attention lately. And there are some good reasons for that.

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Listen to BOB VILA ON BATTERY-POWERED MOWERS or read the text below:

They’re quieter than gas mowers; they’re often lighter to maneuver; they need less maintenance; and they don’t spew noxious fumes. Still, they do have their drawbacks. They’re often a bit more expensive to purchase than gas mowers. And some battery-powered mowers just aren’t as powerful as comparable gas mowers. That’s especially true of the low-end models, many of which run on 18-volt  batteries.

On the other hand, higher-end models that get their juice from beefier batteries may do as good a job—or even better—than their gas powered cousins. If you do decide to go with a battery-powered model, you’ll probably want to pick up an extra battery, to be sure you can finish the job in a  single session.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


Bob Vila Radio: Finishing a Deck

Before choosing a finish for your worn-out deck, consider the maintenance requirements of paint versus stain.

Painted decks are nice to look at, but they can require a lot of maintenance. Constant exposure to sun, water, and foot traffic will challenge even the best paint job.

Finishing a Deck

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Listen to BOB VILA ON PAINTED DECKS or read the text below:

When it does come time to paint—and that may be every year or two—you can take the quick route and use a belt sander to remove just the paint that’s peeling. Or using a chemical paint stripper and pressure washer, you can take the whole deck down to bare wood.

You’ll want to use tarps to protect the house and plants from paint chips and chemicals. Once that’s done… you wait. The surface needs to be completely dry before you apply primer and paint. That may take several days.

At some point in the paint-and-peel cycle, you may want to strip the deck and apply a stain instead of paint. Stain penetrates the wood rather than sitting on top. You’ll still have some maintenance to tend to, but it won’t take as big a bite out of your time.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


How To: Repot a Plant

For a houseplant to thrive, it may need to be moved into more spacious digs from time to time. Here's how to tell when your plant needs a bigger pot, and how to get it there quickly and safely.

How to Repot a Plant

Photo: shutterstock.com

Even if you’ve never before tried to repot a plant, you can do it today without much trouble, probably in under 15 minutes—so long as you’re dealing with a houseplant. It’s a different story with plants that live outdoors, not least because they tend to be larger and heavier, and therefore more difficult to move about. But for the vast majority of plants grown on windowsills and desktops, repotting is a simple and—in my opinion—a relaxing and fun job. Probably the trickiest part is deciding when it’s appropriate to move a plant out of its current container. One sure sign is if the plant has stopped growing. Another is if the roots are poking through or visible near the drainage holes on the bottom of the pot. Still another indication, less obvious than the others, is if the foliage has lost its vigor and begun to go limp. Once you’ve determined that your houseplant would prefer roomier accommodations, go ahead and follow the easy steps detailed below.

MATERIALS AND TOOLS
- Hand fork or trowel
- Gardening scissors
- New pot
- Potting soil or compost

STEP 1
Bring the plant you’re repotting to an area where you feel comfortable making a little mess. Indoors, many people simply cover a table with newspaper. In some cases, watering the plant to dampen (not soak) the soil may make it easier to remove the plant from its container. In other instances, it’s easier to work with dry soil. Use your judgement. Rest assured that neither technique is better or worse for the plant’s health. Keep in mind that working with damp soil will make the process somewhat messier.

How to Repot a Plant - Roots Detail

Photo: shutterstock.com

STEP 2
The best way to remove the plant from its current home depends both on the size of the plant and the type of pot it’s in. If it’s a small plant in a plastic nursery container, you can simply turn the container upside down and gently squeeze from the bottom, using your free hand to guide the plant out.

If it’s a larger plant in, say, a heavy terra-cotta pot, work a gardening fork or trowel around the edge of the soil in the container. Root damage is inevitable here, but try to keep it to a minimum. Next, lay the pot on its side and turn the container (not the plant) slowly, thereby twisting the plant out onto your work surface.

STEP 3
Now it’s time to prepare the new container. Double-check to make sure that it has at least one good-size drainage hole; if it doesn’t, you can always create one with your drill/driver. Some indoor gardeners like to line the bottom of pots with stones or broken pottery to further enhance drainage.

STEP 4
After filling the container halfway with new potting soil, use gardening scissors to clean up the plant and its root ball. Remove any old stems that could slow the plant’s growth, and cut away any dark-looking roots. With your hands, gently break up parts of the root ball to encourage new growth.

STEP 5
Position the plant into its new container so that the top edge of the root ball hits an inch or two below the lip of the pot. Add soil to backfill around the sides of the root ball until the plant can stand upright on its own. You may need to pack the soil, but be very careful not to make the medium too dense.

STEP 6
To help your plant cope with the shock of having been repotted, give it a good soak. Finally, return the plant to its favorite perch, whether it’s the humid environment of your bathroom or the cheerful sun of a bay window.