Category: Tools & Workshop


HGTV Opens the Door to a Beloved 90s Star

We're always eager to peek inside a celebrity's home, but to watch a beloved star sweat the design details and chip in on the work site—that's a real treat. Jennie Garth's new show on HGTV has us hooked.

The Jennie Garth Project - Bobcat

Photo: HGTV

Color us impressed: Best known for her role in the long-running series 90210, Jennie Garth has opened her large-scale home renovation to HGTV viewers in a new show, The Jennie Garth Project. In its debut episode last week, we were introduced us to the ’70s ranch in the Hollywood Hills that Garth plans to re-do in her own style. As it turns out, she has done serious work on several houses in the past. But this is the first time that she’s overseeing the design decisions—and the numbers.

The Jennie Garth Project Review - Framing

Photo: HGTV

The premiere focuses on the living room. Here, on the wall facing the garden, Garth is working with Harrison-Anderson General Contractors to replace windows with glass pocket doors. Also on the agenda: installing new hardwoods, repairing the crumbling fireplace, and refinishing the wood ceiling. Since Garth and her children are going to live in the house upon the work’s completion, the stakes are high. Choices matter, not for resale, but for the home’s livability. And mistakes made will be ones she has to live with.

Related—Where the Stars Go: 11 Big Celebrities’ Beautiful Bathrooms

Garth tackles some tough calls along the way, with budget constraints and limitations of space forcing compromise. At one point, she finds out that seven inches must be sacrificed either from the kitchen or the master bedroom closet. It’s the sort of lose-lose moment of impossible frustration that we can all relate to.

There are many more reasons to watch. Our favorite part? The simple tips we’re snagging from a beautiful blonde many idolized (or pined after) as teenagers. When evaluating how much a new fireplace would block the view to her yard, Garth snappily built a cardboard replica to help her visualize its effect. Smart.

Tune in for more tips from Garth and to watch her exciting project unfold; the next episode airs tomorrow at 9PM. For more viewing times and renovation photos, visit HGTV.


Bob Vila Radio: Reciprocating Saw Safety

It's one of the most handy tools in the do-it-yourselfer's repertoire, but like any power tool (especially ones outfitted with a blade), the reciprocating saw demands special safety considerations.

Reciprocating saws—the ones with a motor and a thin, straight blade that juts back and forth—are one of the most useful tools you can own.

Reciprocating Saw Safety

Photo: shutterstock.com

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Listen to BOB VILA ON RECIPROCATING SAW SAFETY or read the text below:

Reciprocating saws can cut through wood, metal, and all sorts of construction materials. But they can also be dangerous and need to be handled with the utmost care.

One of the main hazards of recip saws is their potential for kickback. That can happen if you make the mistake of pulling the blade out of your cut while the blade’s still moving. The tip of the blade smacks into the material you’re cutting, and the whole saw, including the moving blade, kick back toward you. If you happen to be on a ladder, that’s especially bad news.

You also need to keep in mind that the blade can bind unexpectedly. That’ll cause the blade to stop moving, but not you and the saw. Be sure to keep a tight grip. One final caution: a saw blade can generate a lot of heat, so give it some time to cool down before trying to change it.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 60 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


Bob Vila Radio: Circular Saw Safety

So long as you know what you're doing with it, the circular saw can be a tremendously handy for a variety of projects. Here are some tips on using the tool safely.

Although circular saws are one of the most useful tools you can have in your toolbox, they can also be one of the most dangerous—that is, if you don’t know how to use them properly.

Circular Saw Safety

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Listen to BOB VILA ON CIRCULAR SAW SAFETY or read the text below:

Here are a few safety tips: First, make sure the material you’re cutting is positioned correctly. For example, never attempt to cut the middle of a board whose ends are resting on sawhorses spaced apart from one another; as you’re progressing with the cut, the board will likely sag and pinch the blade, causing the saw to kick back. Instead, position the sawhorses closer together and use clamps to secure the lumber.

Never try to use a circular saw to make a cut in a stud. Again, you risk a kickback. Better to use a reciprocating saw for that job. Most importantly, once you’ve started a cut, never attempt to lift the saw or remove it until you’ve released the trigger and the saw blade has come to a complete stop.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 60 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day. 


Bob Vila Radio: Installing Toggle Bolts

Planning to support a heavy load, be it shelving or a framed mirror, on plaster wall? The best starting point is to install toggle bolts. Here's how.

Installing wall hooks or fasteners into plaster walls isn’t difficult—that is, if you use the right approach. Probably the best type of anchor to use is a toggle bolt; they’re the ones with the threaded “butterfly” that’s spring-loaded.

Toggle Bolt

Photo: homedepot.com

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Listen to BOB VILA ON ANCHORS FOR PLASTER or read the text below:

First, use two pieces of painter’s tape to mark an X over the spot where you plan to drill. That’ll help keep the plaster from cracking.

Using a drill bit that’s just slightly larger than the butterfly on your bolt, drill through the tape and the wall, then gently withdraw the bit straight out and remove the tape. Slip your fastener onto the toggle bolt.

Next, thread the butterfly onto the bolt, squeeze the butterfly, then pass it through the hole until you feel the butterfly open. Use your fingers to tighten the bolt, then finish with a screwdriver. Be careful not to over-tighten the bolt, or you could crack the plaster.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


In the War Against Wet, A New Weapon

A new line from Rust-Oleum repels water, mud, ice and other liquids from a variety of surfaces. We put one member of this product family to the test. Read on to find out what happened.

Spray an even coating on leather or fabric. Here I'm using it to renew the waterproofing on a pair of old boots. Photo: JProvey

In the war against wet, homeowners have a new weapon: It’s called NeverWet. Designed to repel water and keep surfaces dry, the NeverWet line of products from Rust-Oleum includes four different formulations—Multi-Surface, Fabric, Boot & Shoe, and Auto Interior. Armed with a single one of these sprays or the complete trio, homeowners can now bring protection from the weather to a wide range of household items that spend time outdoors, including garden tools and outdoor furniture.

Don’t get me wrong—I like the rain. But moisture in itself isn’t the problem. What’s really at issue is the mold, mildew, corrosion, rot and (last, but surely not least) skin discomfort that often comes along with an excess of moisture. So when recently I got the opportunity to review the NeverWet fabric formulas, I jumped at the chance to see how the product could help me safeguard those items in my life that I count on to remain dry. For my experiment, I chose leather boots and a cotton patio furniture cushion.

To both, I applied an even coating of NeverWet, according to the instructions, and I wetted but didn’t soak the surface I was treating with the spray. Next, I waited the recommended 24 hours before exposing the items to water. Once enough time had elapsed, I hurried to see how my boots had stood up to the ultimate test—being submerged in a bucket water. Keep reading to see what happened.

Photo: JProvey

In the photo above, the boot I did not spray is on the left. You can see that after five minutes of submersion, the leather became saturated, particularly around the stitching. Meanwhile, the boot on the right of the photo—the one that I did spray with NeverWet—shed water effectively and came out of the tub as good as new.

Equally impressive results arose from my test of the patio furniture seat cushion, which I hosed down in a way that would simulate rainfall. Where it encountered the NeverWet-treated cushion, the water simply beaded up and rolled off. A few days later, I tried again and was satisfied to see no performance change whatsoever.

The treatment worked equally well on the outdoor cotton chair cushion. Photo: JProvey

Down the road, I’ll need to re-apply NeverWater at some point—to the boots sooner than to the cushion, I’m guessing, being that I wear the boots fairly often. Also, even though NeverWet didn’t discolor my boots or the cushion, if I were going to spray anything whose surface I judged to be delicate, then I would first try the spray in an inconspicuous area before committing to spray the entirety. Depending on what you are spraying, you can get 20 to 60 square feet of coverage per bottle.

It’s recommended that you only use NeverWet outdoors, where there’s plenty of ventilation. Be safe using the product, and you’re likely to enjoy the experience as much as I did. Today, I’m deciding what I want to waterproof next!

This post has been brought to you by Rust-Oleum. Its facts and opinions are those of BobVila.com.


How To: Use Wood Filler

Use wood filler to repair scratches, chips, gouges and other surface imperfections in the furniture and trim work around your home, effectively and efficiently.

How to Use Wood Filler

Photo: suemartinteam.com

Scarred flooring, rotted window frames, chipped furniture—common problems like these can be time-consuming and expensive to repair. Or they can be dealt with quickly and affordably by homeowners who know how to use wood filler. If you’ve never worked with this stuff before, get excited: It might soon be your favorite item in the toolbox. Simple in concept and easy to apply, wood filler works wonders to remedy surface imperfections in a vast, varied range of household items.

Which type of wood filler should you use? The answer depends largely on the job. As the name suggests, stainable wood fillers are receptive to staining so that once you’ve applied the product, you can stain over it to ensure the repaired section matches the rest of the piece that you’re fixing. Typically, water-based wood fillers may also be stained (or painted), but unlike other products in the same category, these are specially formulated for use indoors. Common applications are molding, paneling, and cabinetry. Heavy-duty solvent-based wood fillers are meant primarily for outdoor use and perform well on exterior siding and trim.

MATERIALS AND TOOLS
- Sandpaper
- Shop vac (or tack cloth)
- Wood filler
- Putty knife
- Polyurethane sealer
- Paint or stain

How to Use Wood Filler - Exterior Detail

Photo: diyadvice.com

Working with wood filler may at first blush strike you as messy and haphazard, but precise results are not only possible, they are in fact rather easy to achieve. It’s important to note, however, that wood filler is intended strictly for superficial issues, such as scratches and gouges. If the damage calls for a proper repair, wood filler is no substitute. That said, there’s no shortage of ways in which to use wood filler to improve the look of both practical and decorative elements that have seen better days.

STEP 1
Start by preparing the surface to which you are going to apply wood filler. For one, that means removing any loose chunks of wood or flaking paint. Next, sand any rough edges in or immediately adjacent to the damaged area you wish to repair. Finally, clear away all lingering dust and debris by means of a shop vac or moistened tack cloth (if you use the latter, wait for the area to dry completely before you proceed).

STEP 2
Now, apply the wood filler using a putty knife. Start at the edge of the damaged area, pressing the wood filler into the depression. Overfill slightly to allow for the fact that the filler shrinks as it dries. Once you have applied as much filler as necessary, smooth over the filled area with a clean part of the putty knife.

STEP 3
Allow as much time as needed for the wood filler to dry. Depending on the depth of the application, that could take anywhere from 15 minutes to eight hours. Once dry, sand the filled area so that its height is flush with the surrounding wood. When you run your hand over both the undamaged and freshly filled parts of the item you are fixing, you should feel only the slightest difference between the two.

STEP 4
Having sanded the area smooth, complete the project by applying your choice of finish. In most cases, the goal will be to make the repair virtually unnoticeable. So if you’ve been working on a baseboard painted white, concealing the fix is simply a matter of painting over the filled area in the same shade.

Stained pieces are trickier to deal with. For the best possible match, it’s recommended that you dab some wood filler onto a piece of scrap wood. Wait for it to dry, then test the stain to see how it looks. Depending on the test results, you may then choose to thin out the stain, use a different color, or (if you got a close enough match) proceed to apply the stain to the item that you’ve now successfully fixed—cheaply, easily, and possibly in less than an hour.


Bob Vila Radio: Tips on Cutting Plywood

Though plywood can be difficult to cut cleanly, these tips on sawing plywood can help you get the job done well, with a minimum of hassle.

Plywood is a versatile product great for lots of building projects. Cutting it can be a little tricky, however, as the edges are prone to little tears and nicks. Here are a couple of tips to help you get cleaner cuts in plywood.

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Listen to BOB VILA ON CUTTING PLYWOOD or read the text below:

Sawing Plywood

Photo: shutterstock.com

The most important thing you can do to get a clean cut is choose the right blade. If you’re using a jigsaw, you need a fine blade specifically designed for plywood or laminate. For circular saws, get a good carbide-tip blade. And for table saws or miter saws, you’ll need a blade with 80 teeth per inch (TPI).

Second, understand how your saw works. The tearout usually happens on the side of the cutting action. So if you’re working with a jigsaw, which cuts on the upstroke, place your plywood with the good side face down. Also place the plywood face down if you’re using a circular saw or miter saw. For a table saw, flip the plywood over so it’s face up.

Whatever saw you’re using, give the plywood plenty of support. Those big sheets can be unwieldy, and an unexpected shift can cause chips. Finally, try running painter’s tape along the length you intend to cut, and score your cut line with a razor first.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


Bob Vila Radio: Lumber Grades

Did you ever wonder what differentiates the many grades of lumber you see at the local home improvement center? As it happens, there are only a few things necessary to remember. Learn more now.

If you feel a bit confused when you walk down the lumber aisle in your local home store, you’re not alone. For a basic DIY project, it can be tough to know exactly what the names and grades are all about. Here’s a primer on different grades of lumber.

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Listen to BOB VILA ON LUMBER GRADES or read the text below:

lumber-grades

Photo: shutterstock.com

The first thing to know is that no piece of lumber is perfect. That being the case, lumber grades are based on the number of defects in a board. The highest grade is called FAS, for “firsts and seconds.” After that comes “select.” Both FAS and select grades are good choices for architectural framing, molding, and other uses that call for long lengths of wood with few defects. What constitutes a defect? A number of things, including knots, bark pockets, decay, splits or holes.

After select comes “common,” which is suitable for uses that require shorter lengths of clear wood. Number 1 common is often called cabinet grade, since it provides clear boards in the lengths and widths needed for kitchen cabinets. Meanwhile, Number 2A common is an economy grade, so expect shorter lengths without defects. For smaller projects, where long lengths of clear, straight boards are not necessary, number 2A common is typically more than adequate.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


Bob Vila Radio: Stripped Screws

Stripped screws can make simple jobs a lot more challenging. Try one of these simple solutions to this commonly occurring, uncommonly annoying problem.

Inserting or removing a screw is one of the simplest jobs there is. But a stripped screw head can turn a simple job into a real head-scratcher. Here’s what you need to know to remove a screw when the slots are worn away.

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Listen to BOB VILA ON STRIPPED SCREWS or read the text below:

Stripped Screws

Photo: shutterstock.com.com

If there’s even a little left of the slots, you may be able to get a grip by slipping a portion of a rubberband between the screw head and your screw driver. Sometimes that’s all it takes to provide the grip you need to turn the screw.

If that doesn’t work, try positioning your screwdriver in the center of the screw head and tapping it in lightly with a hammer. That may create enough of a depression in the head to let you get the screw moving. Alternatively, drill a tiny hole in the center of the head, just deep enough to let you set in the tip of a Phillips screwdriver.

Still not budging? If you have a small rotary tool, such as a Dremel, you may be able to carve a new slot that goes deep enough to allow for a good grip.

Remember, a screw usually gets stripped when its soft metal head is worn away by the screwdriver, so be careful when driving in a screw, especially with a power driver. Don’t let the screwdriver spin out of the slots.

Bob Vila Radio is a newly launched daily radio spot carried on more than 75 stations around the country (and growing). You can get your daily dose here, by listening to—or reading—Bob’s 60-second home improvement radio tip of the day.


How To: Remove a Stripped Screw

Even the most conscientious DIYer is bound to strip the occasional screw. Don't let this annoyance get in your way! Next time, try one of these useful tips for removing a stripped screw. You'll be back to work in no time.

How to Remove Stripped Screws

Photo: w6rec.com

It was supposed to be a quick and easy repair. But darn it, one of the screws wouldn’t budge, and so by the time you finally finished, it had grown dark outside. Yes, stripped screws are extremely frustrating, but they’re not impossible to deal with. In fact, it can be pretty easy to remove a stripped screw. If you don’t own a screw extractor—a special tapered drill bit with a square head—then all you need to know are a handful of (lifesaving) tips. Scroll down to see what they are.

 

1. RUBBER BANDS

How to Remove Stripped Screws - Rubber Bands

Photo: shutterstock.com

Before trying anything else, try this: Put a rubber band over the stripped screw, firmly insert the point of your screwdriver, then slowly unscrew the fastener. Don’t have access to a rubber band? Substitute a bit of steel wool instead or some of the green abrasive from the scouring side of a sponge.

 

2. PLIERS

How to Remove Stripped Screw - Pliers

Photo: shutterstock.com

Inspect the screw head closely. Is there any daylight between it and the surface to which it’s fastened. If so, see if you can get hold of the screw with a pair of locking pliers, also known as vise grips. Provided that the tool has a firm grip on the screw, you should be able to turn the pliers until the screw loosens and pulls away.

 

3. HAMMER 

How to Remove Stripped Screws - Hammer

Photo: shutterstock.com

Use a hammer to tap the screwdriver down, lodging it as firmly as you can into the screw head. Doing so may provide the extra grip you need to twist the fastener, especially if it’s made of soft metal—and, of course, soft metal screws are the kind that are most likely to become stripped in the first place.

 

4. FLAT-HEAD SCREWDRIVER

How to Remove Stripped Screws - Screwdriver

Photo: shutterstock.com

Does the stripped screw have a Phillips head? If so, reach for a flat-head screwdriver narrow enough to fit (in its entirety) within the Phillips-head hole. Keep in mind that it takes real muscle to pull this off. To facilitate things, it’s smart to combine this clever strategy with the rubber band method described in Option 1.

 

5. OSCILLATING TOOL

How to Remove Stripped Screws - Dremel

Photo: shutterstock.com

If there’s a Dremel in your workshop—and if you’re a committed DIYer, you probably should own one of these handy oscillating tools—affix the metal-cutting disc and create a new, deeper slot in the screw head. Follow up with a flat-head screwdriver, pressing it firmly into the indentation and twisting it slowly.

 

6. DRILL

How to Remove Stripped Screws - Drill

Photo: shutterstock.com

Sometimes drilling a small hole into a stripped screw can allow your screwdriver to reach deeper into—and achieve a better grip on—the stuck fastener. If you’re going to try this approach, make certain to use a drill bit designed for use on metal, not wood. And don’t drill too far down; the screw head could pop off!

 

7. NUT

How to Remove Stripped Screws - Nuts

Photo: shutterstock.com

If you’re experienced with welding and have the necessary equipment on hand—and you really want to remove that pesky stripped screw—here’s a last-ditch effort you can make. Spot-weld a nut to the top of the screw head, wait a sufficient period of time, then remove both screw and nut by means of a socket wrench.

Armed with all these tips, the next time you strip a screw you can rest assured it’s not the end of the world—it’s just another solvable, albeit annoying, problem. No single trick works every time, but once you’re familiar with the options at your disposal, you’ll gradually learn to recognize which scenarios call for which particular solution.