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Bob Vila

05:57PM | 01/03/13
Member Since: 07/07/11
51 lifetime posts
Bob
Bvmisc
As you adopt your New Years' Resolutions, be sure to do something for your home—and your wallet. Take the Bob Vila 2013 Energy Diet Challenge and let us know how you plan to make your home more efficient this year!

margaretlouise

11:57PM | 01/03/13
Member Since: 03/16/11
17 lifetime posts
I've had a leaky faucet for a couple months, but after reading about the water waste in your 12 Ways to Put Your House on Energy Diet I am shamed into getting it fixed this weekend. I had not idea that seemingly innocent drip was wasting 10 to 30 gallons a day. Thanks for the re-awakening.

lrubin

01:08PM | 01/07/13
Member Since: 03/19/12
8 lifetime posts
That's great margaretlouise! You've inspired me to fix the leaky faucet in my bathroom that's been going for far far too long. Any other ideas?

shag66

03:33PM | 01/08/13
Member Since: 02/25/10
2 lifetime posts
Well, we live in a large 1920's home in New England so the winters get cold and the summers are hot and humid, the family already calls me the "energy warden" because I am always looking for ways to not only cut our cost but to simply save on energy usage. Everything on your list of 12 is already done except unplugging everything, some but not all get unplugged. This year I plan to add better (the accurate amount) of insulation and when I can afford it I will replace windows but for now they are sealed for the winter and some stay sealed through the summer months as well. If you have any other suggestions, I am all ears!

lrubin

06:38PM | 01/08/13
Member Since: 03/19/12
8 lifetime posts
Hey shag66, what type of insulation are you looking to add to your house? Also, which windows are you looking at installing that seem to be more energy saving?

BV000091

10:19AM | 01/09/13
Because I rent an apartment, there's only so much I can do to reduce the amount of energy I use. But I do what I can. Upon moving in, I installed weatherstripping around the doors and windows to minimize air leaks. I also put in a low-flow shower head (that I can take with me if/when I move). It's not much, but it's a start. This year, I plan to make sure that appliances are only plugged in when being used (save for the refrigerator)

craftyclean

10:25AM | 01/09/13
Member Since: 01/09/13
2 lifetime posts
Ah! A pledge! That's exactly what I need. I will unplug things like chargers and lamps when I'm not home and am planning on putting insulation film over my windows. Things get pretty drafty here.

craftyclean

10:25AM | 01/09/13
Member Since: 01/09/13
2 lifetime posts
Ah! A pledge! That's exactly what I need. I will unplug things like chargers and lamps when I'm not home and am planning on putting insulation film over my windows. Things get pretty drafty here.

kilcourse

10:29AM | 01/09/13
Member Since: 01/09/13
1 lifetime posts
Our house was also built in the 20s. The original casement windows are intact and beautiful—they really "make" the house. So there's no way we were every going to get rid of them. That said, the leaded panes were remarkably inefficient (and the drafts were uncomfortable in winter). About five years ago, we had storm windows custom-made to fit the irregular window frames. This was pricey, but replacing the casements with modern windows would have completely obliterated the home's charm. When you're talking about retrofitting older homes with "green" upgrades, some common recommendations (like double-pane, low-E replacement windows) just don't make any aesthetic sense whatsoever. There's a trade-off

shag66

11:27AM | 01/09/13
Member Since: 02/25/10
2 lifetime posts
Iruben: I plan to just put in r-30 fiberglass over the existing insulation in the crawl spaces above the living room and kitchen, blow in above the bathrooms (because there is no other way to get up there other than through the light)and anywhere else we can get the tube in and when we end up remodeling the attic I will use the spray foam but that won't be for a few years and they might come up with something better. As far as windows go, we have replaced several with Anderson windows. The original double hungs had the small panes of glass and the new ones have the pane lattice in between the two sheets of glass with gas and all that. Other than the fact that we got vinyl instead of wood you really cant tell the difference. The kitchen has 5 casement windows and the hubby and I are at odds about what to replace them with, I want double hung for ventilation and fans and he wants casement to keep the house true to itself. We found that waiting until they were on sale and doing it ourselves that each window is less than $300, even the custom sizes with all the perks, the drawback is you need to get 5 or more at a time for the real good discounts. Hope that answered everything for you.
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