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cam

01:35PM | 10/21/02
Member Since: 01/03/02
18 lifetime posts
Bvbasement
I have a 4X8 soil area that abuts the foundation wall the ground is about 4 feet above the inside floor. The foundation is poured concrete. I want to put paver stones in to prevent the rain from hitting the soil and seeping in to the basement. If I put the pavers square against the outside foundation, should I put some type of sealant or caulking between the paver and the foundation, or is this not the way to do it?? Being this is just a small area, I did not want to go the route of a french drain.

Jay J

02:00PM | 11/06/02
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Why don't you install gutters???

Jay J -Moderator

PS: God Bless America!

cam

12:38PM | 11/07/02
Member Since: 01/03/02
18 lifetime posts
To J the Moderator:
I think with answers like yours, you should not be allowed to participate. People enter questions because they need help. So along comes a genius who assumes before confirming, and does not provide any intelligent information. I DO have Gutters professor. I still get the water in. Reread the entry for the problem as it presents itself. And if you cannot lend any useful information then please do not respond with sarcasm. By the way does the adminsitrator know you provide answers like you do?? Or do they think you are amusing in your condescending to subscribers.

Jay J

03:04PM | 11/07/02
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
I'm no professor. I'm admitting that. And as far as reading the question as it presents itself, I did, and I think that what you're wanting to do should take a 2nd seat to gutters. Why should I assume anything? Geesh, it would have been extremely useful to know what measures you've taken already to mitigate the water problem.

If you have water running off a roofline, why in the world would you 'promote' the collecting of water at, or near, the foundation EVEN if you seal your paver-seams? Obviously, I'm missing something. And from where I'm sitting, you didn't think to say anything about the obvious. What the he| | - Am I suppose to be a mind reader? Should I ASSUME that you think I can see your 'situation' from where I'm sitting? And what I mean by the "obvious" is you seem to think that the obvious was mentioned, or even eluded to. Where is there a 'hint' that you have gutters??? And if you do, why aren't they catching the roof run-off? That's right - I'm a genius. I should already KNOW what you're talking about ...

OK, now to answer your question as it presents itself on face value, I'll try to be a mind reader. Answer: Don't do what you want to do. If you have gutters, 'fix' them so the water doesn't make it to the ground. Then, you won't have to take such an unusual approach to water management. Make sure you have drip-edge. Make sure your downspouts are extended 3' from the foundation. Make sure your landscape is sloping at least 1" per foot for a minimum of 3' from the foundation. (Doing this would permit water to pool, if necessary, to a depth of 3" AWAY from the foundation, at a distance of 3'. That MAY be OK ...)

The problem w/your idea for water management is that water has a tendency to follow the path of least resistance. I'll assume you live where it freezes. (You didn't say that either.) With that, water will make its way into cracks and crevices and expand and contract over and over, until your problem reappears. Besides, once water from the roofline runs off and hits the pavers, where does it go from there? That's an AWFUL lot of water that's going to collect in 1 area.

Yes, there are sealers and glues to do what you want. Additional problems I see is that there's going to be too much movement. The only way to prevent movement is to install something along the lines of a sidwalk that's sloped along your foundation. Small pavers are easily moved by Mother Nature. It won't matter if you put down the right 'bed' as if you're installing a patio/walkway.

How's that Einstein? Let's see if anyone else gives you the time of day. If not, ponder the reason(s) why ...

Jay J -Moderator

PS: God Bless America!

cam

03:31PM | 11/07/02
Member Since: 01/03/02
18 lifetime posts
Jay....Sorry, Hope you are accepting apologies..
It has been a long day, and you were the closest ****** available. That seepage problem has been a thorn in my side for awhile. The people we bought the house from said there were no water problems. Well, so far I have ripped up a basement of wall to wall carpeting and spent 2300 on a basement draing and sump pump. Still not finished. Anyway, sorry for the tantrum, and thank you for the information.
Sincerely... A. Einstein

forced347

05:26AM | 11/13/02
Member Since: 11/12/02
7 lifetime posts
I would bet that the drainage in that area is inadequate. As stated above make sure the ground slpoes away from the foundation. My basement was seeping like yours and I built the area up with some top soil, tamped it down and then I but a paver patio that abuts the house and drainage area. We have had several heavy rains since and I have not seen a drop of water in the basement.

FWIW, I may be a good idea to seal the walls with DryLoc, it is good insurance and brightens up the place.

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