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stevarino

08:43PM | 02/19/04
Member Since: 02/19/04
3 lifetime posts
Bvbasement
When installing a footer drain under a basement concrete floor, can other footers that intersect with the "drain footer" be tunneled under to route the drain pipe?

treebeard

03:37AM | 02/20/04
Member Since: 01/14/03
265 lifetime posts
If this is new construction and the footings haven't been placed yet, sleeves for the drains should either be placed under the footer locations for the future drains, or through the footer forms for the future drain. If the footers are already in place, tunneling can still be accomplished as long as it's kept to a minimum in any one area. It is usually recommended that the backfill be flowable fill, which is basically a lean concrete mixture that can fill all spaces around the pipe and under the footer where compacting is no longer possible.

stevarino

10:15AM | 02/20/04
Member Since: 02/19/04
3 lifetime posts
Your reply is much appreciated. Thank you. This drain installation would be installed on an existing house built in 1960. I have no definate plans for anything yet. Once in awhile the rear basement wall gets a little water pooled at the bottom of it. I am just checking to see whats involved for different methods. The footer drain will probably be the last resort if no others correct the problem or if other methods cost too much. I have noticed that where the wall is getting wet that there is gravel on the outside of the house along this area, so first I will do a little regrading and get rid of the gravel. Thanks again.

plumber Tom

01:18PM | 02/20/04
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
If your system is going to be on the inside (usually the cheapest and most effective way to go) Keep the piping system you install (3" perforated PVC is what I would use) at the same level. Hydrostatic pressure will still cause the water to rise and enter your system. A recommended pitch of 1/4" per foot to the crock or sump pit shall suffice.

stevarino

03:55PM | 02/20/04
Member Since: 02/19/04
3 lifetime posts
Thanks for the info plumber tom. You pretty much confirmed some of my suspicions. I figured that the 3" perf pvc was the way to go if needed. Ive seen pics on the web of flexible that has collapsed. Guess it will be lots of digging to keep the pipe level and at the right grade. I probably would dig and install the drain myself then hire someone to come and do the concrete. While were on the subject I have a couple other questions.

1. I have read that footer depth is around 12", is this a standard depth?

2. Would it be best to also drill weep holes in the base of the blocks and install a drain line to the pvc?

3. Will there have to be an air gap created between the slab and wall when the new concrete is poured?

homebild

09:43PM | 02/21/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
"Thanks for the info plumber tom. You pretty much confirmed some of my suspicions. I figured that the 3" perf pvc was the way to go if needed. Ive seen pics on the web of flexible that has collapsed. Guess it will be lots of digging to keep the pipe level and at the right grade. I probably would dig and install the drain myself then hire someone to come and do the concrete. While were on the subject I have a couple other questions.

1. I have read that footer depth is around 12", is this a standard depth?

2. Would it be best to also drill weep holes in the base of the blocks and install a drain line to the pvc?

3. Will there have to be an air gap created between the slab and wall when the new concrete is poured? "

--------

First of all.... 4" pipe is standard in any and all applications.

1)Footer depth is NEVER standard at 12"...Footer depth is whatever your building code determines is footer depth for your location...and will vary with location from 0" below grade to 72" or more below grade.

2) Weep holes should NEVER be drilled into the base of blocks because the proper method to install drain tiles in on the OUTSIDE of the foundation and NEVER on the inside. INSIDE perimeter drain installation is only used if and when OUTSIDE drains cannot be installed practically or economically. But never preferred.

3) WHAT new concrete?

plumber Tom

02:41PM | 02/22/04
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
Steve homebild is correct in one assumption. The Preferred method he suggests on the outside. Him and I have been over this before. Do you have $50,000.00 to excavate and install exterior footer drains? Or do you have $5,000.00 to do the inside (french drain) method? You can install a mira-drain product nailed up against the block walls after you drill your weep holes (2 per block)This drains water that collects inside the hollow block cavities. Good Luch Steve in your quest for a dry basement.

Anonymous

11:03PM | 02/22/04
Like I stated earlier, I am just doing some research to see whats involved. When the time comes, a professional will be consulted. The problem is not that bad but I do not want it to get worse. I want to learn as much as I can so I will know what is needed. Definetly not going to pay 50K for anything unless its an emergency. I will excavate with a tablespoon before that happens. After further invest I found out that tunneling under another footer is not even needed. The block walls that intersect are actually setting on top of the slab and are not load bearing. Still reading and learning about possible fixes. Thanks for all replies. This is a great forum with lots of knowledgable people.

PS. What I meant by "new concrete" is the slab repair that would have to be done if an interior footer drain is installed.
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