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yellowmazy

07:22AM | 02/29/04
Member Since: 02/28/04
6 lifetime posts
Bvbasement
My new block basement was finished approx. 1 week ago. I discovered yesterday that there are 2 sets of cracks. The 1st one runs down the mortar joint approx. 5-6 coarses, and in places wide enough to see into the NEW basement. The 2nd crack is under the window and runs again approx. 5-6 coarse down the joint and through the middle of one block down to the newly poured floor. I think this is a little premature, since there is no load on any of the walls and not backfilled.

HELP thanks,

very concerned 1st

home builder


homebild

01:11AM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
This type cracking should not be occuring with a brand new foundation, especially prior to backfilling.

If you live in a cold climate, it could indicate that the footer has cracked and now the foundation is completely compromised.

Have an independent engineer or architect examine the foundation before you proceed.

yellowmazy

03:54PM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 02/28/04
6 lifetime posts
I appreciate the response, everyone I've talked to has said the exact same thing. Would a structural engineer be the right way to go and if so is my current contractor obligated to uncover the footers to be inspected. They are covered with perforated pipe and gravel. IF the footer has cracked or shifted how is this fixed and could the entire footer be questionable.

homebild

06:16PM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
An independent structural engineer (possibly along with a soils engineer) would be the first step.

Your builder would be obligated to uncover the footer for inspection to the independent or local code enforcement authorities.

A footer that has cracked and shifted from freezing normally is not repaired because it is questionable, but rather is demolished along with the block above it. BUT a structural engineer may suggest ways to save it using grout and reinforcing bar within the blocks and other type pinning methods laterally to stabilize the damage.

Get the professional advice first, then proceed.

yellowmazy

08:14AM | 03/05/04
Member Since: 02/28/04
6 lifetime posts
Should I also worry about the rest of the footer/block, the rest of it looks great, but this is my first house. Will filling the block with cement and rebar fix the problem. And what about the blocks that are cracked through the middle. Do you have any suggestions about sump pumps/pits, I do have a drain in the same corner where this cracking has occurred. again thanks for the input.

LicensedWaterproofer

11:25AM | 03/06/04
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
please read my post from March 6 2004 on the "Fix it For`em Board"...the truths about waterproofing...It`s there to help all...

homebild

01:38PM | 03/06/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
yellowmazy:

Reinforcing the block is not the real problem. Reinforcing the footer is.

As long as the footer(s) can be stabilized or are currently stable, stabilizing the blocks above will be a cinch or will not be a problem for walls not currently affected.

A structural engineer or architect trained in structure will be able to help at nominal cost.

Sump pumps and pits are only as good as the interior french drains that connect to them.

A good system is one that involves placing drains all along the interior periphery of the basement under floor level and that connect wall-to-wall across the floor at about every 10 foot interval.

French drains are installed to channel water away from the basement and foundation from water table rises. As long as you have a good interior as well as exterior system, you should have no problem with basement water issues.

yellowmazy

01:02PM | 03/07/04
Member Since: 02/28/04
6 lifetime posts
I want to thank everyone for there input, it has been very helpful.
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