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tomz71ss

05:39AM | 11/14/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
Bvbasement
at some point in time, my basement was waterproofed [not sure by what company], and i have leakage in part of one wall. from what i can figure, the drainage system under the floor gets clogged with dirt/silt in the leaky area, thus not letting the water drain to the sump area as it should. i run a snake thru the 'drain pipe' at times, but this is very difficult due to the way my basement is layed out. i am thinking if i can access the 'drain pipe' on the 'starting' end of it, i might be able to 'engineer' something so i can more easily clean out the blockage when needed.

i am sure the problem stems from the outside of the basement wall, but due to added construction etc., the outside of that wall isn't accessable.

so, i am curious as to how these 'systems' are layed out, so i might try to go thru the floor and install some way to flush the line out without digging up my whole floor looking for access.

any ideas?


cellarwater

04:10PM | 11/14/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Yeah, break through the floor and install a tee with a cap that you can hose out the line with. Also I hope the drain is correctly pitched to the sump. A lot of drains get pitched in the wrong direction. C.

tomz71ss

12:31PM | 11/15/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
i'm pretty sure it's pitched ok, cause when 'clear', it works fine.

my biggest question is, in relation to the wall, how far away would the pipe be? right next to it, or a few inches away from it? or is my best bet to pick a spot in the floor, by the wall, say a foot square and have at it?

tia

cellarwater

07:11PM | 11/15/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
If you can measure the distance to the center of the pipe in the sump. Then do the same where you'll dig. Are the pipes clay or plastic or pitch fiber? Let me know C.

tomz71ss

01:29PM | 11/16/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
wow, talk about brain fade! in my quest to figure out how these things are set up, i never once thought to measure for the pipe as you suggested. i plan to 'dig in' this weekend, and will post what i find.

thanks again,

t

tomz71ss

02:21PM | 11/17/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
what would be the best way to 'attack' the floor? i'm thinking a 'masonary' wheel for my circular saw [ i know, at this point you're thinking 'this guy will be missing an arm with any saw' ], seem like a good idea?

also, when 'attacking' the floor, how deep would i have to go? obviously i can see the end of the pipe where it exits into the 'sump hole', but what kind of rise [of the pipe] would i expect to see over, say, 10 - 15 feet?

sorry for the crazy Q's, but i want to handle this in a weekend, and not rip up my whole floor, or all the pipe that is under the floor.

thanks again for the help,

t

cellarwater

04:27PM | 11/17/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Call in the blasting crew!! LOL ;) Take a look at the floor. Do you see a change in cement color where the drain was put in?? How old is the house?? My experience is buildings before 1955, have floors 2-3" thick. Later homes 4-6" thick. If the floor is thin a sledge hammer will work. If it's thick rent a demoloition hammer from a tool rental shop. It is like an electric jackhammer. I own one & it's great for breaking up floors. Let me know how you make out.C.

tomz71ss

01:38PM | 11/18/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
ok, floor color, had thought of that, but as the 'crap' that's causing the problem has stained the floor considerably, i can't see any difference [nor can i along other walls really]. the thickness may be tricky i think, i know the house was built in '45, but i know the 'water proofing' was done much later [this made me think the floor would be 'thinner' in the area of the 'drainage device', or wouldn't it be?]. i was thinking of using the cutting wheel to cut out/deeply scribe a section, then hammer it out if need be so i have a nice clean 'hole' to work with, and i thought that might cut down the chance of unnecessary destruction as well.

now, for my next Q, as you mentioned earlier, there seem to be various types of piping that could have been used in this system, to properly put in a flush T, are these common items that are readily available at HD or lowe's? and depending on what type of pipe, what would i need to join whatever i 'plumb in'?

thanks again for all your help,

t

also, can you post pictures on this board? [direct, rather than a link]i thought you might get a kick out of the mess i need to fix, and if i can repair it, you might want to see some during/after pic's.

cellarwater

05:13PM | 11/18/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Photos, good idea. I can be e-mailed at [email protected] Try the saw with the masonry blade. The pipe is either round clay or an octagonal clay. 3 inch or 4 inch. it should be no more than a foot and a half deep. It also maybe possible there is two floors you'll have to cut through. As for making the connection from the clay to plastic they sell rubber couplers with clamps. Get a tape measure too, you'll need it. keep me informed. C.

tomz71ss

12:59PM | 11/19/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
well, first thing tomorrow i am going to pick up a masonary blade, take some pictures, and get busy. i'll keep you updated.

thanks again,

t
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