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gordonlong

08:50PM | 06/23/05
Member Since: 06/22/05
6 lifetime posts
Bvbasement
I am remodeling my house (which is 2 half doubles). In the attic, I want to knock down the wall and convert these rooms into one bedroom. My questions are this:

1. How do I determine if a beam is load bearing?

2. What can I do to either eliminate or move this beam, as it is in the center of the wall?

homebild

04:16AM | 06/25/05
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
There should be no load bearing walls in a typical attic unless your attic is a full story and bears the weight of ceiling joists.

Billhart

03:52PM | 06/25/05
Member Since: 04/25/05
1915 lifetime posts
I am not that familar with double wides, but most of them I have seen there is not any height in the attic for anykind of usable space.

So I don't know hat wall you are talking about.

And what "beam" or you talking about.


gordonlong

09:09AM | 06/26/05
Member Since: 06/22/05
6 lifetime posts
The house is similar to a single, with it being divided down the center. The house was built in the 30's 0r 40's but we are not sure of the exact time period. Each half is a mirror image of the other. All stairways are in the center of the structure. The attic has approximately 7-71/2 foot ceilings. Toward the outer edges of the house, the ceiling slopes with the roof angle. Both rooms have more than adequate space to be stand-alone bedrooms. When I was refering to beams, I meant the wall studs. Some are 2x4's and some are 4x4's.

Billhart

09:36AM | 06/26/05
Member Since: 04/25/05
1915 lifetime posts
You are talking about a duplex.

I thought that you where talking about somekind of mobile home or modular.

With a simple roof structure the walls would not be load bearing.

However there is no way to know from your description what the roof looks like.

And it would not be common for 4x4's to be used in a non-structural wall. Sounds like it is supporting something.

I sugest that you get someone to do an onsite inspection.


gordonlong

07:33AM | 06/27/05
Member Since: 06/22/05
6 lifetime posts
I wasn't really sure. The houses were a steal for the price and I couldn't pass it up. Fixer-upper, but hey the joys of home ownership :)

Piffin

04:13PM | 07/02/05
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
Hey guys, I have seen several old homes where upper walls were load bearing.

Not uncommon atall.

The situation is generally where a structural ridge beam is needed but free spanning it the length of the ridge would make it large and costly. So intermediate walls or posts are planned into the structure to shorten the spans and size of the ridge beam

Don't know if that applies here or not

Excellence is its own reward!


gordonlong

10:30AM | 07/03/05
Member Since: 06/22/05
6 lifetime posts
Is there any way that I would be able to make the roof trusses self-supporting?

Piffin

02:19PM | 07/03/05
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
Maybe you can get an engineer to design a way to truss build in place.

Excellence is its own reward!


gordonlong

07:33PM | 07/04/05
Member Since: 06/22/05
6 lifetime posts
There's a company nearby that makes prefab trusses. I'll have to check if they may have a product that would do the trick. Thanks for the advice all!!!
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