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joesal

10:28AM | 07/26/05
Member Since: 07/25/05
4 lifetime posts
Bvbasement
We have a forty year old summer home that had a major mold problem in basement. We knocked out interior walls and cleaned up. However we still have mold problem. We have a dehumidifier running in basement with all basement windows closed, along with trap door that leads to upstairs. The question is should everything remain closed in basement or should some windows stay open. Some guys continue to open basement windows saying we need air circulation. Upstairs we have tried keeping all windows closed as well with a ceiling fan running around the clock. Please tell us who is right so we can get the problem resolved. There is supposedly a spring that runs underneath the foundation. It is damp in the basement but no water leaks.

Billhart

12:13PM | 07/26/05
Member Since: 04/25/05
1915 lifetime posts
You did not indicate where this is.

During this time of year the dewpoint is way too high to allow into a cool basement.

You can test to see if moisture is comming through the wall/floor by taping some plastic, about 1 ft sq, to them. Then waiting a day. If moisture is coming through them there will be water beads or dark damp spots under the part covered by the plastic.

joesal

02:44PM | 07/26/05
Member Since: 07/25/05
4 lifetime posts
thanks for the reply.

Property located in Austerlitz, NY

Columbia county.

Should the windows be closed in the house while dehumidifier and upstairs fan are on?

Billhart

08:21PM | 07/26/05
Member Since: 04/25/05
1915 lifetime posts
http://www.weatherunderground.com/history/airport/KALB/2005/7/27/MonthlyHistory.html

Using Albany weather the dewpoint for July has been mostly between 60 and 70.

With a dewpoint of 70 that means that if that air got into the basement and the temp was less than 70 you would get condensation.

Only in the desert SW would it be practical to try and use outside air to "dry" things out.


joesal

03:50PM | 07/27/05
Member Since: 07/25/05
4 lifetime posts
Ok,

thats what we thought.

thanks bill

homebild

07:29AM | 07/31/05
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
Billhart is correct in that warmer air on the outside is usually more humid than your basement air, and by allowing the vents to stay open, you allow this warm humid air to cool and condense under the house.

The exception here, however, is if the basement or crawlspace floor is dirt, then the vents need to be left open because it is more normal for the interior air to be more humid from gaseus water escaping up from the soil.

So it depends.

homebild

07:33AM | 07/31/05
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
The above may also be true (keeping the vents open) if you have a concrete floor but you have water intrusion issues into the basement.

Thius would create a need to keep the vents open to allow excess moisture in the basement to escape out through open vents.

But the bottom line solution is to reduce the amount of moisture coming into the house from without whatever the case...whether from soil, liquid water intrusion, or warm humid air.

joesal

12:00PM | 08/01/05
Member Since: 07/25/05
4 lifetime posts
The basement has a concrete slab. No major water leaks. Just condensation on exposed copper pipes when water is turned on. I copy that the 3 small windows should be shut when dehumidifier is on. What about upstairs on main level during summer months.

We have two small bedrooms, bathroom, living/dining and small kitchen. Should the windows be kept closed all the time with the ceiling fan running.
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