COMMUNITY FORUM

sweet11395

03:19PM | 08/24/08
Member Since: 08/28/03
9 lifetime posts
I've also had two friends use Sanitred and they have been water/moisture free for years.....one had a spring on is property...can you tell me licensed waterproofer how your exterior water proofing can guarantee a solution...water will come up from underneath the floor and infiltrate via the cold joint....it is only common sense to all that a uniform MONOLITHIC coating on the inside will prevent any infiltration into the LIVING area...sure water may infiltrate into the hollow block between the earth and the Sanitred but not into the LIVING area...it is the reverse fish bowl effect!!!

....if a tree root comprimises the foundation then your exterior coating will fail first and Sanitrad second....

you keep claiming BBB complaints why not give us your company so we can check on your complaints?? HUH??? put your money where your mouth is....

Again two of my friends have used in in challenging situations and are 100% completely water/moisture free and I used it on my last house and was moisture free....going to strip the unknown coating (drylock?) on two of my four walls and use Sanitred to stop "sweating"...more than happy to send you pictures, documents, independent auditors as to effectiveness....I can't believe I waster time listening to your dribble as as scientist by trade the Sanitred system not only makes sense but has been proven to me several times over!!!....I'd really like to see how your exterior water proofing system would stop a spring from infiltrating the cold joint...care to explain that??? never mind...the answer is IT WON'T!!!!!

theFoundationExpert

07:48PM | 02/22/09
Member Since: 02/21/09
1 lifetime posts
With all due respect, you are both missing the boat! Or the real issue. Water is not the problem, never was. Water is water. It is the acid within the water that corrupts cement and products with cement. It is the acid which reacts with the alkalines, lime and calcium, creating a chemical process that neutralizes both.

Although the water is the catalyst, it is the acid that presents the true danger. let's not forget that the acid water as it weakens the cement, the blocks, the mortar joints, still remains a force of pressure which can then topple wall, structurally. All the Sani-Tred product in the world can't stop that!

On the flip side, short of excavating and waterproofing the entire foundation wall, moisture will seep in.

I am actually going to try a combination of both - a sub-floor pressure relief system, including the all important weep holes for the blocks, and then after I install the miradrain, with a radon seal, with then finish the walls and floor with Sani-Tred, for a finished look which should work - BUT ONLY AFTER I install a water-management system.

I agree with the 30 year waterproofer - you're not stopping the water from coming in - you're only stopping it from coming into the basement interior.

If you don't have a drain system either outside or inside, you won't stop hydrostatic pressure from the outside. It's amazing, mr. Sani-Tred that here in Maryland and Virginia, that sub-floor drain tile and a sump pump are New Residential Building Code. You can't build or sell a new home without one installed, although most builders will install them incorrectly and they won't work after 2-5 years, sometimes if they're lucky, they'll fail after 10 years.

But, nowhere is Sani-Tred building code. It's a negative side application - negative usually denoting wrong - not correct. Positive, negative, right, wrong. Lets be positive about the negative - I've been looking for a negative side application, because regardless of the fact that you CAN waterproof from the outside, that you can only waterproof from the outside, according to all the engineering textbooks sitting on my shelf, I will happily try Sani-Tred for all the homeowners who can't afford excavation and true or positive waterproofing.

So I will install the drain tile, in round washed gravel, under the floor slab, next to the footing, in a wide 18 inch trench, without fabric and soil filters which clog, with weep holes, sloping the trenches, installing extra pumps for anything over 100 linear feet, running Miradrain 2000R up the wall approximately 2-3 inches to allow the wall to drain out. And then seal the walls with your product. At least I will give it a shot. Might work.

mcdonam0

09:58PM | 10/25/09
Member Since: 10/25/09
1 lifetime posts
I am a Licensed Residential Builder and I have built homes and remodeled even more. I have used sani-tred in the past and always been happy with it. Some customers do not want to pay "extra" for this type of product when they finish their basement. They would rather free up money to make their finished basement really nice. Customers that I have installed Sani-tred for have never called me back to repair leaks. I have had people call back due to musty smell months to years later when sani-tred was not installed. For those people I have to refresh their memory about our talks prior to the start of the job and most want to kick themselves or possibly me for not pressuring them more to put this in their house. Will sani-tred work in all instances..absolutely not. For the average basement it is awesome and a great insurance policy against future problems. Any builder/contractor can help you to do some simple things outside your home to shed water better. If your going to get into excavation around the basement walls it is going to get costly fast. I would certainly try this product long before I put down serious money on major construction to any home I own. The basement in my home was always bone dry because I did not skimp when I built it and I made sure everything was done correctly. Even so, before I started to finish my basement I installed sani-tred. I have a fairly large home and the walkout basement is 2200 sq ft alone. It cost about $3,000 do install this on my floors and walls of my basement. A small price in comparison to the rest of the finished basement. And yes, my basement is bone dry, no musty odor. This product is quite good. It would be better if it were a little cheaper and could fit into more peoples budgets, but I guess you get what you pay for. BTW, don't bother with Dry-Lock and products like that. You will just have to pay (or use your sweat equity) to have them removed when they fail.

ramseur78

05:54AM | 11/18/09
Member Since: 11/17/09
1 lifetime posts
Ok, my situation is I have a townhouse built in 82 which has shown some water seepage. I have a finished basement and I can see signs of moisture were the wall meets the floor. There is moldy drywall that I discovered when cutting a small piece out of the wall near the floor. The worst areas I can tell are adjacent to the neighbor who we share a wall. Outside excavation is not an option. There is currently an internal french drain system in place which seems to have one of the pipes clogged (I'm guessing because it has never had water come out while the other 2 run pretty constant. The piping is the black corrugated kind which I've been told you can't snake because it will tear up the pipe, this makes since. I've looked into doing a totally new internal system very similar to the one described two posts ago. I've decided to wait until I can get behind the walls and see exactly what's going on. Ok, my question is if external excavation is out of the question, mainly because it does not make financial sense to do that to a $130 town house, + I sure can't excavate my neighbor's house, could a sealant like sanitred be an answer. I'm keeping and internal water management system as a last resort, I don't like the idea of guys coming in with jackhammers, digging up my basement floor, and drilling weep holes into my foundation. I'm going to exhaust every avenue first before I go this route. There have been a few posts here asking for specific feedback for their situation unfortunately I did not see them addressed. I would appreciate any constructive feedback, not just bashing other methods/products. Thanks.

itsreallyconcrete

10:53AM | 12/19/09
Member Since: 05/10/08
6 lifetime posts
don't expect it to be a silver bullet',,, while, under most circumstances, it will perform satisfactorily as negative side waterproofing, be aware the wtr's JUST on the other side of the -tred.

any damage occurring will be hidden from view TIL the dam breaks,,, head pressure's very important w/-tred, too.

itsreallyconcrete.com

decorative conc artisan

conc repairs


DeniseC541

04:08PM | 09/14/10
Member Since: 09/13/10
1 lifetime posts
Mrfoundationexpert< It has been over a year I think, since you stated that you would use both types of foundation protection/waterproofing. I am very excited to find out what the results were. PLEASE post them.

thank you.

mallenbiker

09:37PM | 10/21/10
Member Since: 10/21/10
1 lifetime posts
I would also be interested in hearing results. I have a older building in SoCal built on a hill with one wall of bottom story against dirt. Significant water damage over the years and cost of sealing from outside would be prohibitive and disruptive to tenants.

Sanitred dealers are all back east so I would be ordering this for my contractor directly.

Appreciate any users feedback.

David1245

02:11PM | 06/13/11
Member Since: 06/13/11
5 lifetime posts
BUYER BEWARE: SANI-TRED charges a 30% restocking fee for return products which have not been opened. Are they IDIOTS. Oh wait that's for the warehouse guy to take the "un-opened" product out of the box give it a once over and put it back on the shelf? Right off the bat 30% of the purchase price is gone and you have to return the product yourself so you could be in over your head. So your running cost to return is about 35-40% almost 1/2 of what you paid for if you return?. SANI-TRED is over rated and over priced. For $100.00 a gallon of there “PRV” I could buy a 5 gallon drum of Drylock and go further for less. It’s a rip off cover in the own stick goop.

David1245

02:11PM | 06/13/11
Member Since: 06/13/11
5 lifetime posts
BUYER BEWARE: SANI-TRED charges a 30% restocking fee for return products which have not been opened. Are they IDIOTS. Oh wait that's for the warehouse guy to take the "un-opened" product out of the box give it a once over and put it back on the shelf? Right off the bat 30% of the purchase price is gone and you have to return the product yourself so you could be in over your head. So your running cost to return is about 35-40% almost 1/2 of what you paid for if you return?. SANI-TRED is over rated and over priced. For $100.00 a gallon of there “PRV” I could buy a 5 gallon drum of Drylock and go further for less. It’s a rip off cover in the own stick goop.
Click_to_reply_button Inspiration_banner

INSPIRATION GALLERY



Post a reply as Anonymous

Photo must be in JPG, GIF or PNG format and less than 5MB.

Reply_choose_button

Anonymous

Post_new_button or Login_button
Register

Follow_banner_a
Newsletter_icon Google_plus Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Rss_icon