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buzzsaw

06:29PM | 04/28/04
Member Since: 04/27/04
3 lifetime posts
Bvhvac
Hello.

I am trying to figure out which way to go with the insulation in my 1948 bungalow. After seeing some massive ice damning this winter (although no interior damage I can tell - knock on wood), I believe I need to insulate the upstairs.

Currently the roof has two gabel vents on each side and five roof vents across the very top (over kill). The room is hotter than h*ll in the summer and a ice box in the winter. The room is finshed off with wet plaster and has a heat register and cold air return. On each side of the room is the knee walls, they have minimual insulation on the floor and some fiber on the inside of the walls, cannot tell about around the top of the room.

One contractor says to use iceyene on the vaulted roof rafter, therefore making it livable from the top down. The other says to blow in cellouse in the knee walls and add two vents on each side mid way in that knee wall space and blow in the cap vents. I am so confused on which way to get this done.

To add to the mix, of course the downstair walls are not insulated but number 1 wants to spray retro foam and number 2 wants to use the celloulose, but that is a whole other story unless you got an idea on that, too?

Thanks in advance.

homebild

02:07PM | 05/02/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
Whether or not you have overkill for your attic insulation is yet to be seen.

Depending on the size of your upper story footprint, having 5 roof vents and 2 gable vents may be far less than necessary.

Neither contractor is correct in his method to insulate this 'cape cod' style roof.

First, kneewalls cannot be insulated with blown cellulose. There is nothing behind the knee wall to support the blown cellulose. Unless you plan to fill the entire cavity with cellulose behind your kneewall and over the lower floor ceiling with cellulose (a complete waste of time and materials) and unless by doing so you create even more ventilation problems than you currently have, cellulose in this application cannot be done.

Second, icynene remains also impractical. You need to retain a continuous ventilation from the attic spaces behind the knee walls up to the roof peak. Spraying icynene into these areas will only serve to block air flow.

The best and proper method of treating this area is to gut the ceiling and wllas and isnatll fiberglass batts into the knee walls, gable ends, and rafters and utilize rafter vents to assure a continuous flow of air from attic behind knee walls to ridge.

buzzsaw

09:49AM | 05/05/04
Member Since: 04/27/04
3 lifetime posts
Most contractors so far want to add vents to the knee wall and blow cellulose in the knee wall and insultate around the room.

But the one contractor insists that spraying incyene on the roof would "encapsulate" the room upstaris and eliminate the need for any vents and/or ventilation. It blankets the room / house from the roof down making the upstairs livable and not storage.

I am so confused and need to make a decision quick. Please advise.

homebild

07:15PM | 05/11/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
"Most contractors so far want to add vents to the knee wall and blow cellulose in the knee wall and insultate around the room."

Nope.

Cannot be done.

Neither blowing insulation into a space behind a knee wall (by filling ot completely with insulation) nor ventilating a knee wall is acceptable building practice.

"But the one contractor insists that spraying incyene on the roof would "encapsulate" the room upstaris and eliminate the need for any vents and/or ventilation. It blankets the room / house from the roof down making the upstairs livable and not storage."

Also not true.

Incynene does NOTHING to eliminate ventilation at all ever.


buzzsaw

07:29PM | 05/11/04
Member Since: 04/27/04
3 lifetime posts
Thank you homebild, could you kindly give me a suggestion?

The Iceyene guy would like to spray it where he can get to it, without me cutting an access panel in ceiling to do between there and the top of the roof.

All others, want to do the fiberglass batts around the the room in the knee wall area, add the vents (3 on each side, 6 total) and blow cellulose in the knee wall floor.

What would you recommend?

Thank you very much.

p.s. - the bobvila forums need to be upgraded so when you reply it does not prompt you for a subject line and have a MUCH better tree view / search function. Just in case you have input in that area.
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