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kelsey50

06:33AM | 05/31/04
Member Since: 05/30/04
4 lifetime posts
Bvhvac
We are in the process of building a glass victorian conservatory on our home Here is a link to a similar product so you will have an idea of what I'm talking about

http://www.brighthouse.gb.net/article_64.htm

After pouring the foundation, the contractor set up the knee wall around the edge of the foundation and the plan was to have the mason brick the exterior of the kneewall within a matter of days. In the interim, the contractor installed floor joists on the concrete slab and placed fiberglass insulation between the joists and a subfloor on top of the joists. He then placed a sealent on the seams of the subfloor. Immediately after the mason was finished, the walls and the roof of the conservatory were to be erected and the unit was to be dry. Unfortunately, there were delays in getting the brick work done and in the interim, the Midwest was deluged for the past 5 weeks with rainstorms. The subfloor (and possibly the insulation beneath) have been exposed to constant heavy rains for the past several weeks. We are very concerned about damage to the sublfloor and possible mold growth on the subfloor and the insulation. The conctractor said he will rip up a part of the floor to see if it is wet below. He believes that even if the insulation is wet, it will eventually dry out(he says we'll see condensation on the glass as it dries). While they have not ruled out replacing all of the insulation and the subfloor, I believe that they will try to avoid doing so.

Are our concerns warranted? Assuming that the insulation was exposed to water, will it simply dry out without any concern for its usefulness, or mold growth or odor? Is the subfloor able to withstand all of this water without permanent damage? Would we be reasonable to simply insist that the subfloor and insulation be replaced, since it was supposed to be under roof in less than a week after it was laid out? Any advise would be appreciated.

Thanks!

Glenn Good

07:35AM | 06/16/04
Member Since: 09/10/03
314 lifetime posts
It would seem to me that you have a legitimate reason for concern about the moisture problem as well as the mold and mildew.

While the insulation may dry out there are other problems that coincide with the moisture. Mold and mildew as a rule require some form of organic material from which to feed. While fiberglass, as a rule, is not organic the floor joists (unless treated) and the underside of the subflooring are and as such would provide the necessary food source. Any moisture trapped inside the insulation will take time to dry thoroughly and during that time mold and mildew could easily start growing on the floor joists and/or the underside of the subfloor. 5 weeks is more than enough time for mold and/or mildew to start growing. If mold and/or mildew start growing under the floor it would be very difficult to get rid of, as well as the smell.

I think you should insist that a portion of the floor be removed and if any moisture is found (especially in the insulation) you should ask for that the insulation be completely replaced, but only AFTER the floor joists have been allowed to dry completely. In addition if any areas of mold and/or mildew are found they should be sprayed or wiped down with bleach and allowed to dry. Use of fans to help with ventilation will also speed up the drying process.

The biggest problem with wet subflooring is the expansion and the resulting buckling that goes hand in hand. Once the floor has buckled it is very unlikely that it will ever return to a flat surface again. Along with that there is always the chance the flooring will begin to delaminate or fall apart if the floor has been wet for an extended period.

Glenn

Moderator: Construction Systems, Foundations, and Masonry & Stone

For more information about me and/or my qualifications please visit my website at:

www.consultationdirect.com
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