COMMUNITY FORUM

essexdiy

06:20AM | 04/18/05
Member Since: 04/17/05
2 lifetime posts
Bvlawn
Dear all,

I want to build fence on my drive next right on the boundary line with my neighbour. We have a constant stream of tenants next door and my car keeps getting knocks as they use my drive as theirs.

Problem is there is a clay drain pipe right under the boundary line so the maximum depth I can dig to is only 12 inches. The other problem is that the houses are joined at our garages so I can't move the fence in at all. The drive is made up of soft tarmac so I can't screw into it.

I'm really after some advice, do you think 12inch hole and concrete base is enough to support a 4ft wooden fence ?

I thought about driving some metal rods in at angles away from the pipe so they form some extra anchors in addition to the concrete base.

Has anyone had this before, am I fighting a losing battle?

Cheers

Dave

k2

06:43AM | 04/18/05
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hi Dave, welcome to the forum!

Sorry to hear about the issue next door. These situations are never pleasant.

While I don't really have any great suggestions off-hand, that's never stopped me from chiming in on a post before! :)

I must say that 12" doesn't sound all that deep, and I would be concerned about damaging the clay drainpipe.

Does the drainpipe run, say, to the street--and is it on your property? Is there a gentle slope, or can it be dug deeper? I ask because I wonder if it's possible to have the whole thing dug up and replaced as part of the fencing process. A project of this scope (though expensive) would send a strong message to "next door".

I also wonder what your other neighbors on your block have done. Have any of them had similar issues, and how have they handled it? Have they done other things besides fencing (landscaping)? For example, have they had bricks mortared in at an angle between driveways--or anything like that?

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

essexdiy

07:26AM | 04/18/05
Member Since: 04/17/05
2 lifetime posts
Hi,

Thanks for the speedy reply.

Yep its a shame about next door but its one of those things, on the whole everyones fine they just use my car and drive as their own.

mmm I know what you mean, I've read elsewhere the third height rule and I'm way off that.

Drainpipe runs all the way down the boundary line bang in the middle of both properties!. I guess the builders did that to save access problems as its shared. I've also got to run the fence over the access manhole but thats another issue (gap will be made and fence will be removable).

Damage to the pipe is also a concern as I don't know if there's much movement on the cement bell in high winds.

Can't imagine what the cost would be to move the pipe I'll probably save that one for a few years time when we relay the drive.

If I'm lucky the pipe will deviate slightly as it goes down the drive.

Cheers again

Dave

Cheers

Dave

k2

07:48AM | 04/18/05
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hi Dave,

How about another option, like having a concrete curb put in?

I really don't like the idea of mucking with that shared drainpipe.

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous
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