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Indiana

04:06AM | 11/26/01
Member Since: 08/27/01
52 lifetime posts
Bvwindows
Hello,

I recently moved into a new built home in the Western New York region. I have noticed that on some days, there is condensation on the inside (not between the panes) of some of the windows near the edges. Is this normal?

Jay J

11:02AM | 11/26/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi Indiana,

It's not normal. What you're experiencing is warm, moist air that's condensing out on a cold surface. In short, the humidity level in the house (or in that room, or in that particular part of the room) is excessively high.

The sources of moisture are long, hot showers in bathrooms that don't have the steam vented to the outside. Venting a clothes dryer INSIDE the house is bad too. Steam cooking can add to the level too. And don't forget about ventless stoves. (Moisture is a by-product of combustion.) Also, your humidifier may be set too high. A 'normal level would be 35%, give or take.

Do take a look at these items and see what happens. Consider installing (or turning on a fan) in the room in question. Sometimes, the movement of air will alleviate or eliminate the problem a great deal. If this problem persists, mold/mildew and rot will set in.

My best to ya and hope this helps.

Jay J -Moderator

PS: God Bless America!

Indiana

03:36AM | 11/27/01
Member Since: 08/27/01
52 lifetime posts
Jay,

Thanks for the response. I've noticed the problem in a few various rooms in the house. Our dryer is in the basement and vents outside, we don't have a humidifier, and don't steam cook. The problem doesn't persist everyday, and it doesn't happen on every window. My concern was air leaks in the new windows, but your response didn't mention that, so I assume that shouldn't be a concern. Maybe our house is just naturally humid. I'll keep a watch and see what happens. Thanks for the help.

Jay J

04:40AM | 11/27/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi Indiana,

Air leaking INTO the house where that air is WARMER than the inside air MAY cause this problem. If the outside air is COLDER (hence dryer) than the inside air, you shouldn't experience this.

Now, you didn't mention anything about a fireplace or stove heater or space heater or anything like that. Again, these 'things' give off moisture.

Also, if the window in question is on the NORTH side of the house where there is no sun, the inside air needn't be that humid to cause this problem. Try circulating the air in this particular room or 'spot'. At the same time, if the window is on the SOUTH side of the house, then as it cools, moisture may form on it too. Again, circulate the air to see if it helps.

My home is very dry in Winter. And the front of our house faces South BUT we have a porch overhang. Fortunately, we don't have a moisture problem. You could buy a Hydrometer to see what your humidity level is. Check that w/the 'normal' levels for homes in your area.

My best to ya and hope this helps.

Jay J -Moderator

PS: God Bless America!

Alan

06:08AM | 11/27/01
Member Since: 10/09/01
48 lifetime posts
For the record - an instrument for measuring humidity in the air is called a "hygrometer".
Excuse me for being picky Jay J. Alan

Indiana

07:45AM | 11/27/01
Member Since: 08/27/01
52 lifetime posts
Jay,

We don't have a fireplace/stove, just a forced air gas furnace. Our house faces south too. But it seems that windows on both north and south side collect condensation. I'll get a humidity tester and see what it says. Thanks.

Jay J

08:13AM | 11/27/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Ooops! Yes, it's a Hygrometer. A Hydrometer is for measuring the density of a liquid.

Hey Alan, you're not being picky. Just imagine Indiana going to the Science Store looking for a Hydrometer and they send him to Lucky's Homemade Brewing Store! Thanks for the correction.

Jay J -Moderator

PS: Indiana - If you have a ceiling fan, turn them on. You could just have a moisture problem in a 'corner' or something ...

PPS: God Bless America!

WDrake

03:24AM | 12/22/01
Member Since: 12/21/01
8 lifetime posts
I'm no authority, but... New houses are full of moisture and can take several months to dry-out. Until then I suspect most house's sweat a little!
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