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Bonnie Malepsy

01:31PM | 01/30/02
Member Since: 01/27/02
1 lifetime posts
Bvwindows
I recently replaced 6 4'x 6' thermopane picture windows that the seal had broken. The window company did not honor the warranty because they said the windows had been installed wrong. So, I paid to have them replaced by the same company. The invoice for the original windows said they were "clear over low e argon filled and tempered". The window company replaced them with "clear over low-e argon filled and tempered". (Supposedly the exact same window. The second set of windows has an extremely noticeable filmy appearance when the sun shines on them. It looks like it is very smoky or smoggy outside or that the windows are very dirty. Since it is a southerly exposure, the sun shines on them from dawn to dusk in the summertime. The new windows need to be replaced because the appearance is so bad. The window company won't do anything about the problem. They say there is nothing wrong with the windows. Shouldn't the window company have told me this could be a potential problem, especially becasuse they had seen the site and they knew it was a sunny location? Is there more that one type of Low-E window? Could a Low-e window have been installed that wouldn't have this effect?
The first set of windows that I was replacing didn't have this appearance at all. Is it possible that the window company sold me clear glass with the first windows, so when they replaced with "the same kind of windows", they appear completely different?
I have now paid for two sets of windows and they are still unacceptable. I would just like a professional opinion on whether or not the window company should have some responsibility. Thanks to anyone who has a thought on this.

dlf1231

09:05AM | 02/05/02
Member Since: 01/08/02
6 lifetime posts
I think the window company is full of it. It sounds an awful lot like a chemical fog. The insulating glass sealant used most likely off gassed and has left what is called a chemical fog. Just like your first set of windows had a seal failure and allowed moisture through the seal, this case sounds similar in the effect you see through your glass. The raw materials used in insulating glass sealants, of which there are various types, can off gas. Once the unit is sealed there is nowhere for these gasses to go so they remain in between the lites. Depending on what was off gassed, sometimes at room temperatures, this will cause the "foggy" or "smoggy" appearance. My advice would be to remain persistant with the manufacturer and demand they be evaluated. A chemical, or moisture, fogged unit is visually easy to prove and you need to alert the manufacturer that they must abide by their warranty. I dont think it has anything to do with the Low E. It sounds like the problem is between the glass lites.

jroyals

03:57AM | 02/22/03
Member Since: 02/21/03
1 lifetime posts
when low-e glass is instaled into a sash or window frame it has to installed in a certain way. it has an outside and and inside
if installed in reverse it will fog the way you have stated. also from the original window fogging even if it is installed incorrectly what does that have to do w/ the glass. it failed end of story. good luck.

joliz

07:52AM | 02/23/03
Member Since: 02/12/03
5 lifetime posts
We are having the same problem with our windows. Only ours seems to be on the exterior of the windows and not between the panes. We have brand new windows - new house. It is a white filmy look only when the sun hits them - otherwise they look fine. They also have many scratches in them. The manufacturer sent several back to the factory to have them tested. They agreed there is some type of film on them - possibly some type of silicone used in packing. They claim there is nothing wrong with the LOw E or Argon in them. However they have never brought a tester to our home to prove it. I would like to know how to test this on my own. If you know an inexpensive way let me know. We thought the Low E might have been placed on the wrong side of the panes. We are now having a professional window cleaner coming to see if they can get the film off. I'm not crazy about the idea of replacing all the panes - because they said they wouldn't replace the whole sash, just the panes. That doesn't sound very efficient to me - like putting a dent in a brand new Cadillac. What brand windows do you have? I'm wondering if they are the same. Not sure if I'm allowed to ask that on this site. Thanks
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