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aggie109

11:22AM | 01/15/05
Member Since: 01/14/05
2 lifetime posts
Bvwindows
Hi-

I have been doing quite a lot of work to insulate and protect my home but I am losing heat despite my best efforts. I have a good idea that heat is getting lost in the walls due to poor insulation.

Here is what I have done:

1) Replace all central air ducting with metal ducting, sealed with mastic and wraped he ducts in R30 insulation and further added kraft radiant barrier material around this.

2) Replace the heater and AC with 14SEER and 90 OSF units.

3) increased the insulation to R75 through a combination of cellulose, R35 faced batts and unfaced R29 rolls.

4) Added a kraft radiant barrier to the attic.

5) resealed every duct, hole and gap with epoxy.

6) Added passive whirly birds to a total of 6 units and two large gables on a 1600sqr foot house.

7) Insulated all the outlets and pipe leads to the outside.

8) Replaced all the windows with vinyl windows. I added solar film available at ***** (the winter insulative type).

9) Replaced all the entry doors with new insulated doors that are properly sealed.

10) Repainted every room with radiant paint.

11) replace the furnace filter every month.

12) Run the fans constantly in reverse to pull down heat.

13) Added an electronic thermostat.

14) open blind during the day (winter) and close them at night (winter) - we do the opposite during the summer.

But I still am losing heat. I just cannot figure out where. I bought one of those infra-red emperature readers and found that heat is disappearing from two spots: 1) the windows and 2) certain spots in the walls.

My home is more than 30 years old, but I have pretty much modernized it as far as I know how to.

The windows are low-e windows with solar films I added myself. But the windows are about 2 deg F colder than the walls. Using the infra-red thermometer, you can see the cols spots in the walls too.

Do you have ideas where heat is going to? Do you have any suggestiong on how I could improve on what I have done?

Thanks-

aggie109

Piffin

03:29PM | 01/16/05
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
Most of what you mention sounds like overkill and hyperbole`.

You still need Oxygen to live there.

Windows will always be the weak link in any system. The only way to quit losing any heat through them is to get rid of them entirely. They cannot be better than a tenth of the R-factor that the walls are.

But one major factor in an insulatdhome that you do not mention is the floor as near as I can tell. what knid of floor system do you have, where in the climates of the country are you located, and have you done anything to eliminate infiltration there?

Excellence is its own reward!


aggie109

04:04PM | 01/16/05
Member Since: 01/14/05
2 lifetime posts
Piffin-

Thanks for the response-

I know I might be trying to make the wheel a little rounder, but I am trying to make my home as energy efficient as possible in terms of HVAC. It's strange quest- I know.

For a little background info- my home is in the Dallas, TX area. I do not believe the foundation is insulated, so that might be a very good reason where some of the heat is going. I had not thought of that, so thanks for mentioning that.

My home is more than 30 years old and was build as much like more than 40 other homes in my area- cheaply and only insulated as much as required by law at that time.

How much energy do you see leaving through the floors? Other than adding a radiant floor, is there anyway to effect that without rebuilding the foundation?

The windows seem to loose heat rapidly. I noticed the same from a skylight. I wrapped the skylight in more insulation, sealed the edges with spray foams and further added plastic bubble-pack to the skylight. So now, mainly heat seems to leave from the skylight.

If I save a dollar in energy costs now, I will save much more than that in the future.

Thanks,

aggie109

Piffin

06:14PM | 01/16/05
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
Saving is good, unles it costs three to save one.

Anyway, you can dighn down aroundthe slab edges about a foot into the ground and lsuide in 2" EPS or XPS foam insulation board 12" tall all the way around the house to help prevent the foundation heat loss.

Vinyl windows are not typically the best, and there are wide differences betweeen good yinyl and bad vinyl

Excellence is its own reward!


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