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bnme41

10:26AM | 07/17/07
Member Since: 07/16/07
1 lifetime posts
Bvmisc
I'm buying an older house and it has a window in the bathtub it is a full size window. Do you have any ideas what I can do for privacy. I thought about a mini blind but wonder about the mold???

mattburr

01:48PM | 07/19/07
Member Since: 03/20/06
33 lifetime posts
YOU CAN CHECK WITH A LOCAL GLASS COMPANY ABOUT MEASURING YOUR EXISTING WINDOW AND HAVING THEM ORDER A PEICE OF GLASS THAT IS OBSCURED OR FROSTED THAT WILL HELP WITH THE PRIVACY ISSUE. THAT WAY YOU WON'T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT BLINDS OR CURTAINS. THAT WOULD BE YOUR BEST BET.

THANKS,

MATTHEW BURR

BUYER - WINDOWS AND DOORS

VILLAGE HOME CENTER / dba COOPER BUILDING MATERIALS

4650 HIGHWAY 7 NORTH

HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE, AR 71909

EMAIL: [email protected]

MistressEll

05:55AM | 07/20/07
Member Since: 01/30/05
361 lifetime posts
Two options, both very in-expensive, both can be accomplished in minimal time:

1) Reversable: You can find special vinyl sheeted/self adhesive material usually sold in rolls (looks sort of like contact "paper") designed to be mounted to the glass (glazing) of windows. There are a variety of designs (some mimicing stained glass, etc.) which can be placed on the glass. The fancy designs and colors are usually limited to 36" wide rolls - the simple fogged/etched plain rolls can be found in even greater widths.

The advantage of these is that they can still transmit light yet obscure what can be seen (privacy even if it is nightime and dark outside but the bath area is well lit inside). This window dressing can last years, even decades. Removing it is simple - and normally if any residual contact adhesive remains on the window it can be taken off with some rubbing alcohol and/or careful scraping.

2) non-reversable permanent option: get some glass etching compound (found easily at most hobby stores). You can either use the compound to etch the entire glass area (glazing) from the inside or even tape off a design. You would likely want to remove the sash(es) and place them on a flat (protected table) surface to work with the etching compound - as gravity might work against you and possibly drop onto your tile or fixture surfaces (like your tub) and the etching compound can damage the glazed surfaces of same.

You apply the etching compound onto the clean glass surface, wait the designated amount of time, then remove, neutralize, clean then replace the sashes.

If you decide to go this route, I highly recommend you practice on some other glass to experiment with the process - AND when you feel confident to proceed, next test the etch time for your particular glass using a small amount dabbed in the most un-obtrusive corner of your window sash applying a few test dabs with a q-tip and allow to remain for different amount of times to determine the exact time-frame you need to let the etching compound remain in place for the desired "frosting" effect.

Historic glass usually not a good idea to etch.

If you're looking to replace single window glazing for your existing sashes, in such a location the glass should be safety glass or at least tempered glass - this has to be measured and fitted prior to tempering (heat treated). Tempered glass can not be cut after treatment.

MistressEll

06:02AM | 07/20/07
Member Since: 01/30/05
361 lifetime posts
You can also find many (both fabric which sheds water as well as vinyl) window curtains ready made, or make them yourself to match your shower curtain out of a second matching shower curtain you purchase - mount a rod or even use a spring rod. If you are sewing 'challenenged" you could use cafe style clip on rings for the top, and use fabric glue or heat activated hem tape then roll the cut edges/fold twice, placing the hem tape between the back of the curtain and the double hem edge, use a warm iron to activate, and you're done.
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