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HoustonAerosFan

07:39AM | 05/13/03
Member Since: 05/12/03
67 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
I have a major leak on the bottom of my 3-4 year old Whirlpool.

The leak doesn't happen when it is filling or draining, but only when in the wash cycle.

I haven't been able to pull it all the way out yet, since the water line is too short (and this was discovered at 10 PM last night).

Looks like a pump discharge leak? Comments?

Also, the drywall behind the dish washer appears to be shot, not to mention the side of the cabinet (particle board) between the unit and the under-sink cabinet. Might there be something better to replace the drywall with, especially considering there's no way I'm getting a 4' x 8' piece of anything into my Toyota? That Hardie stuff for showers?

Thanks for the help. It looks like my weekend project around the house has been defined.


plumber Tom

05:42PM | 05/15/03
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
If it's not leaking, on the drain cycle, then check the door gasket. Also the entire dishwasher should be able to be pulled out. The Electrician usually leaves extra wire for this purpose. If the supply line is a rigid (hard connection) Install a 4' flex supply line available at home depot or ***** . Ask for a D/W flexy 1/2" x 3/8" OD.Then pull the appliance out, and start running the cycles. Check for leaks. If you notice water leaking before it drains, then it may be the door gasket. if you notice a leak on the rinse, then check the clamp on the pump housing. Check your owners manual in the troubleshooting section to diagnose your specific problem.

HoustonAerosFan

06:01PM | 05/15/03
Member Since: 05/12/03
67 lifetime posts
And the answer is....

The heater element had worked loose in a far corner, and over time it melted through the cheap plastic bottom of this Frigidare (not Whirlpool). So, I have about a 3" "L" shaped area where the bottom had mostly melted through. That's where the leak is.

To the rescue is an old tube of GE silicone sealant from the garage. It's curing now.

Now, for appearance sake, would some white Bondo over the top look better? There's still maybe a 1/8" depression where the melt-through occured. Or would the Bondo even stick to silicone/plastic (probably PVC or polystrene)?

I guess ***** mean L--O--W--E--S, censored since Mr. Villa isn't affiliated with them? How silly can people get to think we've never heard of the place? (I did by the tube of sealant at Home Depot, though).

[This message has been edited by HoustonAerosFan (edited May 15, 2003).]

DanO

09:18AM | 05/16/03
Member Since: 11/11/02
2271 lifetime posts
** old tube of GE silicone sealant from the garage. **

I hope it was food safe or you may be poisoning yourself and your family by using the dishwasher afterward.

The only silicone safe for use in a dishwasher (or any appliance that deals with food or food handling items) is one which is also safe to be used in fish tanks. It should say if it is right on it label.

** for appearance sake, would some white Bondo over the top look better? **

Same goes for this!

Dan O.
www.Appliance411.com
The Appliance Information Site

=Ð~~~~~~

[This message has been edited by DanO (edited May 16, 2003).]

HoustonAerosFan

10:02AM | 05/16/03
Member Since: 05/12/03
67 lifetime posts
Thanks, I'll check that out.

HoustonAerosFan

10:26AM | 05/16/03
Member Since: 05/12/03
67 lifetime posts
Here's an interesting point -

http://www.myberkeleyhome.com/aroundthehouse.html#caulk

Silicone sealants remain highly flexible for years, don’t shrink after application, and resist UV light well. Most cannot be painted. They can be somewhat messy to apply and require mineral spirits or solvent for clean up. They don’t stick well to wood or concrete, but do stick very well to glass and ceramic tile. The maximum joint size is ½ inch to 1 inch. GE Silicone II Kitchen & Bath contains a mildewcide. Do not use any sealant containing a mildewcide inside a dishwasher or where food or dishes are stored. Before using a silicone sealant, test it for freshness.

Glad I didn't use this one!

DanO

12:13PM | 05/16/03
Member Since: 11/11/02
2271 lifetime posts
Most silicone sealers contain mildewcide. Ones that don't will usually be labeled safe for use on fish tanks as the fish will die otherwise.

Dan O.

HoustonAerosFan

12:45PM | 05/16/03
Member Since: 05/12/03
67 lifetime posts
Saw some at Petsmart's web site. Fairly expensive, a 3 oz. tube costs what a 10.5 oz tube of regular silicone costs at Home Depot or L--O--W--E--S.

I assume you can say Petsmart on this forum?


DanO

01:31PM | 05/16/03
Member Since: 11/11/02
2271 lifetime posts
** I assume you can say Petsmart on this forum? **

I was only aware of - S e a r s - being edited out (and maybe dirty words).

Dan O.

[This message has been edited by DanO (edited May 16, 2003).]

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