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linda-r

12:08PM | 09/01/04
Member Since: 10/17/02
7 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
I had this noisy Hotpoint refrigerator. At least, I thought it was noisy, making a high-pitched noise, but when I replaced it for a new one, GE model GTR15BBRRCC, it's just as loud. Maybe it's my ears.

I got it through ***** and 2 repair people listened to it and said it was not unusual, but I still think it's loud.

At the ***** store, they had a Kenmore #64522, and on their website is also an Amana ATB1504ARW. The Kenmore in the store sounded quieter than this GE, but their store has 4 speakers going at once and the appliances are near the stereo systems, so it wasn't like hearing it with a quiet background.

These are all top freezer, no ice maker, frost free. My main constraint is the 28" width. The Kenmore at the store is a little too deep and the Amana is the right depth, but not at the store so that I could hear it before buying.

One difference between the Kenmore and this GE is that the Kenmore had wires (coils?) on the back, and the GE doesn't, they're enclosed or something. I don't know if that's a difference in the sound.

The high-pitched loud sound seems to come from below the refrigerator, as if small coils are vibrating or something.

Does anybody have experience with which refrigerators are quietest? Especially in this 28" size (fairly small, a little larger than a studio apt fridge).

Thank you.

appliguy

03:15PM | 09/01/04
Member Since: 07/23/04
491 lifetime posts
Hi,

Some common noises on modern frost free refrigerators...

http://www.applianceaid.com/images/fridgenoises.JPG

**One difference between the Kenmore and this GE is that the Kenmore had wires (coils?) on the back, and the GE doesn't, they're enclosed or something. I don't know if that's a difference in the sound**

The one with no condensor coils on the back has an extra fan under that might contribute to making more of an sound. The condensor coils are still there, but they are underneath the refrigerator.

**Does anybody have experience with which refrigerators are quietest?**

No make or model#'s...but I'd think the refrigerator with the condensor coils down the back may be slightly quiter, but you do need a little more air space above with that style.

jeff.

Appliance Repair Aid

http://www.applianceaid.com/

linda-r

09:36PM | 09/01/04
Member Since: 10/17/02
7 lifetime posts
Jeff, thanks for your reply.

I forgot to mention, the decibel level is about 65 decibels measured with a sound level meter from Radio Shack, taking the reading just in front of the lower part of the General Electric GTR15BBRRCC fridge. This is weighting C that covers all frequencies (pitches), 32 to 10,000 Hz. The weighting A, supposed to be just in the human ear's range, 500 to 10,000 Hz reads 57 dB.

Also, a note about the coils below causing more noise:

In a refrigerator, a liquid--usually Freon--is pumped through the appliance, where it evaporates into a gas as it absorbs heat from the refrigerator's insides. The gas is then compressed and forced through a big exterior coil, where it relinquishes its collected heat and becomes a liquid. As it reenters the refrigerator, it vaporizes again into a gas, beginning another heat-extracting run. In older models, the condensing coil is behind the refrigerator; in newer models, to make room for deeper shelves, the coils are underneath. But down there, insufficient air moves past the coil to cool it by convection. "So they added fans," says Lyon. As a result, refrigerators are noisier.

-- http://www.acoustics.org/press/swa9602.html

If anybody can post refrigerator decibel levels for comparison, that would be great and much appreciated.


appliguy

02:57AM | 09/02/04
Member Since: 07/23/04
491 lifetime posts
Hi,

Just needed to say:

**In a refrigerator, a liquid--usually Freon**

Wrong. Freon was a trade name for one style of the "refrigerant" used.

**is pumped through the appliance, where it evaporates into a gas as it absorbs heat from the refrigerator's insides. The gas is then compressed and forced through a big exterior coil, where it relinquishes its collected heat and becomes a liquid. As it reenters the refrigerator, it vaporizes again into a gas, beginning another heat-extracting run. In older models, the condensing coil is behind the refrigerator; in newer models, to make room for deeper shelves, the coils are underneath.**

For the most part, correct.

**But down there, insufficient air moves past the coil to cool it by convection. "So they added fans," says Lyon. As a result, refrigerators are noisier.**

Not always true. Yes an added fan can/could/might make the units running noise level higher...on some makes ( Maytag is one )...rarely do we ever get a complaint from the condensor fan motor or compressor making noises...we get more complaints about the gurgling/popping noises the "refrigerant gas" makes in the freezer and the evaporator fan motor noises in the freezer.

JMO!

jeff.

Appliance Repair Aid

http://www.applianceaid.com/

linda-r

10:23AM | 09/02/04
Member Since: 10/17/02
7 lifetime posts
> an added fan can/could/might make the units running noise level higher...on some makes ( Maytag is one )...rarely do we ever get a complaint from the condensor fan motor or compressor making noises...

Jeff, do you mean Maytag has loud fans, or that you rarely get complaints about Maytag?

Thank you,

Linda

appliguy

02:02PM | 09/02/04
Member Since: 07/23/04
491 lifetime posts
**Jeff, do you mean Maytag has loud fans, or that you rarely get complaints about Maytag?**

None/rarely complaints about compressor or condensor fan motor ( underneath ) noises....lots of noise complaints with gurgling noises ( refrigerant ) in the freezer and evaporator ( freezer ) fan motor.

jeff.

Appliance Repair Aid

http://www.applianceaid.com/
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