COMMUNITY FORUM

etacarinae01

12:08PM | 06/03/05
Member Since: 06/02/05
2 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
I just bought a brand new house and had ***** come to install W/D. After the guy installed the washer, he turned on the washer for a test run, but instead it flooded my entire house!! He had hooked up the washer to the wrong drainage pipe b/c he didn't check to make sure that he was hooking it up to the right pipes. Here are my questions:

1. Is it true that the installer could use a flashlight to look down the drainage pipe to make sure it is the correct one to use?

2. In addition, couldn't the installer also be able to feel with his fingers whether the drainage pipe is the correct pipe to hook up the washer to?

I'm asking b/c ***** is refusing to replace my carpets, b/c they say it's not their fault and that their men are not trained plumbers and cannot differentiate between different drainage pipes. Is there any truth to this?

Please help! Any information would be greatly appreciated. My contact is sdnguyen@gmail.com.

Billhart

01:16PM | 06/03/05
Member Since: 04/25/05
1915 lifetime posts
To give them there due I am not sure why there are 2 "drains" that could be confused as to which is which. That in by it'self might have taken them off the hook.

Not knowing what the other "drains" are or there characteristics there is no way to tell you what they could have done to tell it was the correct drain or not.

HOWEVER, "After the guy installed the washer, he turned on the washer for a test run, but instead it flooded my entire house!!" if they turned started the washer and walked away and it OVERFLOWED then that is plain negligent on their part. They should have monitored the whole cycle. There are many things that could caue water problems including a bad hose or defective washer.

BUT, if it was not an overflow, but rather the pipe went someplace else and was not connected so that water dumped into another part of the house and not seen at the washer then I don't see that they have any responsibility.

"I just bought a brand new house"

If this ia brand new home then the builder would have some responsibility to have the is capped or identified that is is not for water, specially if it was near an area where one would expect to have a washer drain.

If this was just new to you the seller "MIGHT" have a liability in not disclosing the problem.


etacarinae01

01:38PM | 06/03/05
Member Since: 06/02/05
2 lifetime posts
Thanks for your reply. The "dummy" pipe actually sent the water in between the walls of my house and flooded it that way. It was not an overflow of the machine--it was an installation problem. I have talked to the builders, but they are pointing the finger at ***** saying that it's an installation problem and the installer should've checked the pipes before installing. That's why I am inquiring about the drainage pipes. I will probably consult some plumbers to see what they have to say. Thanks.

tomh

02:15PM | 06/03/05
Member Since: 07/01/03
550 lifetime posts
I really never have heard of such a thing as a dummy pipe. An open drain pipe that terminates in the wall but is available to an installer or homeowner. There is no test or check for that. The builder should have removed or capped the pipe. I tend to side with the installer on this. Unfortunately, as with all things in dispute, this will either go to arbitration or court. If damages are significant and uninsured, talk to an attorney.

DanO

05:38PM | 06/03/05
Member Since: 11/11/02
2271 lifetime posts
** 1. Is it true that the installer could use a flashlight to look down the drainage pipe to make sure it is the correct one to use? **

Very unlikely IMO.

Maybe if they had a remote camera system and a snake and could feed it into the drain all the way to the point of connection... But that isn't really an appliance installer's job.

** couldn't the installer also be able to feel with his fingers whether the drainage pipe is the correct pipe to hook up the washer to? **

Giving your later statement of, "the "dummy" pipe actually sent the water in between the walls of my house and flooded it that way", could anyone have gotten their "fingers" inside the wall to see that the pipe was not connected to anything??

** ...is refusing to replace my carpets **

Unless the carpets were allowed to fester in that condition for at least several weeks, there should be absolutely no reason they should have to be "replaced". A simple professional cleaning should be the most they would need. It wasn't sewage which spilled onto them.

IMO you should contact your insurance company and they can take the matter up with the builder which is the only person I can see even remotely responsible.

JMO

Dan O.

www.Appliance411.com

The Appliance Information Site

=D~~~~~~

Handyman

05:35AM | 06/13/05
Member Since: 11/18/98
187 lifetime posts
I recently inspected a home where the builder had a standpipe and one of those plastic boxes for hot and cold water and drain. The plastic box’s drain had no outlet. We had them seal this so it could not be mistaken.

If the cap could be lifted and mistaken for a drain it could be the home inspector's error in not finding it but your builder's error in not properly locking this off.

Why would you ever need a non-functioning drain in your home? If it didn't happen this time, when you sold your home five years from now. (USA average) the new buyers would be suing you. Not Lo wes Se ars or Bes t buy or whomever you purchased your appliance from. They do a brief install. They are not licensed plumbers. Now if they pulled a permit and said they were "installing" this washer which included actual plumbing, ie running water lines and drains. (not attaching hose type connections and placing a black j-hose to the drain hole) they could be liable as well.

The most you will probably get from them is free delivery, which you may have already gotten.


Click_to_reply_button
Inspiration_banner

INSPIRATION GALLERY



Post a reply as Anonymous

Photo must be in JPG, GIF or PNG format and less than 5MB.

Reply_choose_button

captcha
type the code from the image

Anonymous

Post_new_button or Login_button
Register

Even if you turn off your electronics whenever you're not using them, they continue to use energy until you unplug them. S... Filling an underutilized area beneath the stairs is a smart way to save space. Doing so with a stash of wood, however, is ... For some decorative recycling, consider burying old bottles upside down to create edging for your garden beds and walkways... Chocolate-colored walls and large window frames allow the exposed wood beams to take center stage in this small screened p... If you're not crazy about the idea of commingling plants and pool, this modern variation may be more to your liking. The s... Yes, a freestanding garage can become its own tiny house. Artist Michelle de la Vega has all the comforts of a modern resi... There’s nothing like a new set of cabinet hardware to refresh a room. The possibilities are endless: Go modern, rustic, or... Filling an underutilized area beneath the stairs is a smart way to save space. Doing so with a stash of wood, however, is ... Like no other floor type, a checkerboard design works wonders to underscore the retro kitchen theme. Vinyl flooring, ceram... Twine lanterns add pops of crafty—but sophisticated—flair to any outdoor setting. Wrap glue-soaked twine around a balloon ... When securely fastened to a tree or the ceiling of a porch, a pallet and some cushioning make the ideal place to lounge. V... Incorporate nature into your lighting scheme by securing a dead tree in a concrete mold and draping your pendant lamp from... For the cost of a can of exterior paint , you can totally transform your porch. Paint the floor a hue that complements yo... In this urban apartment, a standard-issue patio became a serene and green perch by replacing the typical concrete with gro... If you put the washing machine in the mudroom, you can stop the kids from walking through the house in dirty, grass-staine...
Follow_banner_a
Newsletter_icon Google_plus Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Rss_icon
 
webapp1