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Jim D

04:22AM | 08/17/07
Member Since: 01/06/01
345 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
DanO - hi, I haven't been on here in quite some time...I'm hoping you can confirm my suspicion here.

I'm working on a Kenmore washer, Model 110.92582100, serial CD3346389, so it appears to be a Whirlpool unit made for Sears. The cold water fill rate is extremely slow - two small trickles versus a good stream like the hot side. I pulled the hose and checked it for blockage - no problem with the hose. I pulled the water inlet screen (small filter) from the water inlet valve, reattached the hose, and the fill rate appeared to be much improved. (I didn't run a test wash cycle, though. Shame on me!)

I tried washing clothes yesterday and the fill rate is back to the small trickles. I'm guessing the water mixing valve/temperature control unit (sorry - don't have the proper name) may be bad. It's the only other thing (other than the water inlet valve) that controls the amounts of hot and cold water filling the washer tub during operation. I don't suspect the water inlet valve since water does get through it.

Any ideas/recommendations you can offer are always welcomed and appreciated. I'd have searched this board for similar posts but it appears the old "post search" capability is missing?! I've been away a long time! (Between prepping for my military retirement, actually retiring, looking for new employment, and finally locating it and having to become a long-distance commuter/weekend homeowner again...well, it's been busy.) Regards! Jim D/West Point, VA (living weekdays in Vienna, VA)

DanO

09:11AM | 08/17/07
Member Since: 11/11/02
2271 lifetime posts
Hi,

** Kenmore washer model 110.92582100. The cold water fill rate is extremely slow. **

That washer model uses an electronic control (see the following link) to regulate water temperature.

LINK > www.the-appliance-clinic.com/ddtemp.html

If it is definitely not a problem with blocked filter screens in the hoses or at the valve, there may be a problem with either that electronic control or the temperature sensor unit (see the following links).

- Kenmore 110.92582100 Electronic Temperature Control

LINK > www.appliance411.com/data.php?ap=AP3175691

- Water Inlet Temperature Sensor

LINK > www.appliance411.com/data.php?ap=AP3020264

JMO

Dan O.

www.Appliance411.com/parts/?ref411=Kenmore+Washer

The Appliance Information Site

=D~~~~~~

Jim D

10:04AM | 08/17/07
Member Since: 01/06/01
345 lifetime posts
DanO - hi again! I saw your reply and read through the info at the first link. It makes me wonder if the water inlet valve might not be part of the problem. The washer is in the apartment I rent for my weekday stay in the DC area and I'm now at home in West Point, so I'll have to try and do more troubleshooting next week.

Do you have any hints on what voltages I should see at specific connectors? I can check those if it'll help narrow thr problem down.

The other thing I should mention is the washer's temp selector settings include auto temp ones (between the 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock range when looking at the selector knob) as well as non-auto temp settings (between the 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock range). I recall the auto temp settings are ignored in specific wash modes.

I did look at the Sears parts website, found the model of washer, and looked at the diagrams. They show the temp selector knob in a different location on the control panel. Mine's the second knob from the left as you look at the control panel, while the diagram shows it all the way to the left. (That's where my load size/fill level selector is.)

Again, thanks for your quick reply and any tips/hints you can offer to help me narrow down the problem. I'm hoping to fix this fairly easily and cheaply as I'm getting tired of lugging my work clothes home to wash versus washing them only in hot water (or taking well over an hour to wash a load on cold). Regards! Jim D/West Point, VA

DanO

05:44PM | 08/17/07
Member Since: 11/11/02
2271 lifetime posts
** Do you have any hints on what voltages I should see at specific connectors? **

The solenoid on each side of the water valve (hot/cold) operates on 120 volts. When that particular side should be letting water through, that's what voltage that side should be receiving.

* It is very dangerous to work on a 'live' appliance (one that is plugged in), especially one which also deals with water. Unless you're familiar with safety precautions, it should not be attempt. *

** I looked at the diagrams. They show the temp selector knob in a different location on the control panel **

Those diagrams are not blue prints and not necessarily an accurate representation the appliance in question. They are just a rough guide to the possible locations of parts of the machine.

Dan O.

www.Appliance411.com/parts/?ref411=Kenmore+Washer

The Appliance Information Site

=D~~~~~~

Jim D

11:32PM | 08/19/07
Member Since: 01/06/01
345 lifetime posts
DanO - hi again and thanks for the reminder about being cautious. Even with 33 years of electronics experience under my belt, I can always accept a caution.

I'm wondering if simply reversing the water hoses can help me troubleshoot & eliminate the water inlet valve...since the cold side doesn't seem to flow well, I should be able to hook the hot water hose to the cold connection (and vice versa) and see if the water inlet valve still trickles on the cold water side. If so, would that help any? Or, would that simply confirm the temperature sensor is bad?

Would disconnecting the temperature sensors, or the electronic temperature control, help in eliminating the water inlet valve as the culprit? I'm thinking if I disconnect the temperature sensor, and the water inlet valve works fine, then it's the sensor and not the valve.

Thanks again for sharing your wisdom and wizardry! regards! Jim D/West Point, VA (back up in Vienna, VA)

DanO

09:16AM | 08/20/07
Member Since: 11/11/02
2271 lifetime posts
** I'm wondering if simply reversing the water hoses can help me troubleshoot & eliminate the water inlet valve since the cold side doesn't seem to flow well **

You could try it but since the sensor is expecting a certain temperature on each setting, having the valve supply totally wrong water to it may produce unexpected results. It shouldn't hurt anything to try though.

** Would disconnecting the temperature sensors, or the electronic temperature control, help in eliminating the water inlet valve as the culprit? **

The control acts upon the information from the sensor. With it being totally absent from the circuit, I do not know how the control would behave. Normally the control would always sense at least some resistance from it.

** I'm thinking if I disconnect the temperature sensor, and the water inlet valve works fine, then it's the sensor and not the valve. **

Testing the sensor's resistance would be the usual way it was determined to be the problem. What resistance it should be at any particular water temperature should usually be listed on the appliance's wiring diagram.

JMO

Dan O.

www.Appliance411.com/parts/?ref411=Kenmore+Washer

The Appliance Information Site

=D~~~~~~
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