COMMUNITY FORUM

igounfazed

03:44PM | 12/03/06
Member Since: 12/02/06
6 lifetime posts
Bvdecor
I have searched and searched for the answer to these questions. So I am in really high hopes that it could be answered here.

I am remodeling my kitchen. I have taken off everything (old cabinets, appliances, old drywall, linoleum, etc.), basically; I am down to the wall studs and concrete floor.

Something to bear in mind: I live in a condominium.

*I want to use 4'x8' - 1/2inch MDF panels for the walls instead of drywall.

I cannot find anything anywhere that says how to work with MDF for walling purposes.

For instance: drywall has beveled edges to ease joining. That way you get the look of an all flat surface. MDF does not have that.

Keeping in mind that I DO want to use MDF for the walls. How do I work with them? What technique is used to join the seems in a fashion that appears to have NO seems at the joints?

If you have pros and cons (about MDF only) that my help me out. By all means, please set me straight.

However: Please just don't bash my idea as I have gotten from everyone else. A true reply would be great.

Please help me out.

~Cesar

What's the difference between a rock and a hammer?

Piffin

03:57PM | 12/04/06
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
I would be interested in knowing why. I can assume a couple oof reasons why but might be wrong. Both of the reasons I'd assume can be better satisfied with other products besides drywall.

but if I just had to use MDF to make a client happy, and they wanted a smooth surface with invisible joints, I would tell them the following -

It will cost a lot more

the joints will show a hairline crack after a time

It will cost a lot more

I'd have to make sure the stud faces are shimmed or furred to provide a nearly perfect flat planed bnase to apply the MDF on.

I would install it thusly - use PL premium on the stud faces for Permanent adhesion.

Use same adhesive or gorilla glue on the joints when putting it up.

Countersink screws to hold it to the studs permanently. Maybe use finish nails alternately but still predrill.

Then after all is said and hung, I would use bondo to pack and smooth the seams.

Excellence is its own reward!


igounfazed

01:33PM | 12/05/06
Member Since: 12/02/06
6 lifetime posts
That is a very good outlook. I must say you are the first reasonable idea - or person to know of a method - that I have received information from.

I have to say. I don't mind paying the $17.00 per 4'x8' sheet.

If your guess is that I want stronger more resilient walls than what drywall affords, with the added convenience of very smooth faces. Then you have me figured.

So, I have to ask about the "hairline crack" that appears after time?

As for my walls to be covered: 90"x95". My concept for placement: cut one in half (long ways) to use half from ceiling - whole in the middle - and the other half at the bottom.

That is to help hide the seems with cabinetry.

Would your method still work with the above MDF placement plan?

~Cesar

What's the difference between a rock and a hammer?

Billhart

02:43PM | 12/05/06
Member Since: 04/25/05
1915 lifetime posts
If you are looking for a wall that is hard to dent and is also smooth there are other options.

Firs it to use abuse resistant drywall. It is used in schools and similar places.

Another option would be to install 1/2" osb or plywood. Then cover is with 1/4 or 1/2" DW. If you want it dead flat them skin coat it or use "blue board" and plaster veneer coated.


igounfazed

03:27PM | 12/05/06
Member Since: 12/02/06
6 lifetime posts
The second option sounds interesting (the non-blue board option). I have not thought about that (placing two different sheet materials).

Although, I am somewhat limited with depth. The floor is grooved with a 1/2" slot on the floor towards the studs.

*A prior construction fitments that I would very much like NOT to disturb. (Also one of the reasons I thought of 1/2" MDF - fitting of the singular sheets.)

Would the strength and durability still hold true with lets say... 1/4" MDF/OSB/Plywood panel and a 1/4" drywall panel? Would that construction provide me the strength and durability I seek?

~Cesar

~So... What's the difference between a rock and a hammer?

Piffin

02:17AM | 12/06/06
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
given your more complete description, here is what I would employ as the soolution to the problem;

buy 1/2" MDO rather than MDF. This is a plywood with a very smooth side and a paper face. When made in 3/4" and doubnle sided, it is called signboard, because it is commonly used for painted signs exterior use.

Is will be far lighter than MDF and esier to use, yet extremely resistant to damage. It would be easy to apply to the studs with glue and finish nails, and the paper face allows it to be finished in a typical drywall manner. The only difficulty would be that there is not a recess at the edge like SR has to make taping flat seams easier. The finisher would need to float material further out from the seam, or you would need to use other means to assure a flat seam, which I could describe if you are interested.

The plywood base also makes it easy to hang cabinets or art on it.

Bill had a good suggestion also. I have done this in old home renovation when removing thick plaster and replacing it. This was in a home where the owner planned to hang a lot of art, so having the osb behind the SR provided a hanging surface.

That can also be doen with 3/8" cdx plywood and 1/4" SR over, and not add much to the thickness of the wall.

The reason tape is important on a seam is to avoid the telltale hairline crack later after painting.

Excellence is its own reward!


igounfazed

11:04AM | 12/06/06
Member Since: 12/02/06
6 lifetime posts
I'm sold on the idea for MDO. Lighter weight, resilient to exterior use, easier to use, with typical drywall applications. That sounds just like what I want. Meaning for my search of durability, strength, and usage.

I will be hanging cabinets and other knacks upon them, so it sounds like a really good bargain between both SR and MDF. Being lighter in weight to me is also an extra plus as I do have a bad back and am doing this work mainly on my own.

Please do describe the proper process for its use to me. How to finish it properly for "seems" sake. And, has any experience with the MDO yielded you with techniques that you are willing to share? For instance a certain nail or screw type that you feel is best?

Now my search begins for a source of MDO, as I don't recall seeing "MDO" inside HomeDepot.

~Cesar

~So... What's the difference between a rock and a hammer?

igounfazed

03:44AM | 12/22/06
Member Since: 12/02/06
6 lifetime posts
Piffin, I found a source for the MDO panels, only the sheets they carried were 3/8" x 4' x 8'. They provide delivery and cutting. So that, being that I have a bad back, was a really good deal for me. So I will be making the cabinet walls in MDO and the remaining kitchen walls in SR.

If you are still able to provide a little guidance on finishing the MDO seams. I am very interested in knowing how it could be done.

I appreciate everyones replies and help. This is definitely a good source for answers to questions rarely asked.

~So... What's the difference between a rock and a hammer?
857-bumping_this_thread_

Piffin

02:43AM | 12/25/06
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
tape the seams as you normally would with SR.

But there are a couple of tricks/techniques that can help

When hanging it to the studs, you can map it out first, and rip some thin strips on a table saw if you have one or just find some cardboard to cut up - not corrugated, but solid pasteboard type. Staple these strips to the studs EXCEPT for the space eight inches either side of where your butt seams will be in the MDO ( 3/8" is fine BTW)

This shimming will make the MDO install slightly convex to the seam so by the time you build up slightly with tape, the finish plane of the wall is flat.

You can use drywall screws but make sure the heads bury slightly

Merry Christmas

Excellence is its own reward!


igounfazed

12:04PM | 01/28/07
Member Since: 12/02/06
6 lifetime posts
Hello Piffin. I am in high hope that you still check this thread from time to time. I am about done with all the walls that will be MDO. That is a really good thing for me. I am really happy with the way it is coming along, and the way that it looks.

And this is why I am in high hopes that you read this. I do not know what I would have done without your positive reinforcement and well thought ideas to my less than novice questions. I do not think I would be at the stage I am with the MDO walls without your guidance. You can not really imagine how glad I am that you provided me with your help.

Most other people - including some friends - were really negative to the idea to use something other than SR. Some words not allowably mentionable here. So it was definitely great to have come in contact with this forum and your positiveness.

Using the MDO to me has been a great thing as I am doing this myself. It is very light. With a weight that even with my bad back I can handle. Cutting it is also easier than cutting the MDF would have been. MDF might be small particle fiber, but MDF goes through blades rapidly.

Seaming as you directed is working great, and the adhesion of plaster, tape, and MDO was surprising to see. Shimming for the convex shape... well, it's easy to see why experience yields genius.

Thank You for your guidance. I cannot satisfactorily emphasize to you how glad and appreciative I am for it.

-

~Cesar

"So... What's the difference between a rock and a hammer?"
872-a_message_for_piffin
Click_to_reply_button Inspiration_banner

INSPIRATION GALLERY



Post a reply as Anonymous

Photo must be in JPG, GIF or PNG format and less than 5MB.

Reply_choose_button

Anonymous

Post_new_button or Login_button
Register

Follow_banner_a
Newsletter_icon Google_plus Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Rss_icon
 
webapp2