COMMUNITY FORUM

DGFalk

06:13PM | 07/29/02
Member Since: 07/28/02
5 lifetime posts
Bvtools
My home is a center hall colonial built c.1820. We are in the process of jacking the house floors and outer shell to a level position (needs to come up a good 3.5"). I need to replace to two main girders that provide all the interior support for the house (they sit under the center hall walls). I'd like to use LVL, but I'd also like to use a pressure treated product as the girders I'm replacing have rotted out on one end --creating the need for jacking.
Do you know of a pressure treated LVL product?
thanks much.

Mark Hammond

04:15PM | 08/02/02
Member Since: 05/09/01
246 lifetime posts
Hi DG,
I looked and found no source listed on the web but I will not stop looking. At any rate what about using steel for the girders? It isn't that difficult to work with and lighter for its size than you might think. The question of rot is gone and it can be painted with any number of rustproofing paints. Also depending on what size you use you may not need lally columns and open the basement up for other uses. Check the local code for info.....Mark hammond

DGFalk

09:59AM | 08/04/02
Member Since: 07/28/02
5 lifetime posts
Thanks for the reply Mark. A more complicated follow-up: I wanted to outline my plan for repairing/reinforcing my main girders, and see if anyone had any comments or suggestions.
It won't be possible for me to completely replace the two main girders, the northern end of each girder is completely gone (lally columns have been providing the support), the southern end is in very good shape, firmly supported by the solid stone foundation. The two main girders run under the center hall walls, front to back; all the floor joists run off the main girders, spanning to the foundation sides and under the center hall. The floor joists are mortise & tenoned into the main girders. I'd like to cut back the rotten section of the girders, replace with pressure treated lumber, and then use flitch plates on either side of the girders to sister up to a lally column and solid wood, bolting through the girder and each steel plate. To accomplish this I'll need to provide temporary support to the floor joists using cribbing and jacks. Then I'll cut back the floor joists --through the tenons-- enough to get in the steel flitch plates in. Once I have the flitch plates all bolted in, and the stone foundation built back up, I should be able to set the new flitch plated girders down on the foundation. Then I would be somehow attaching the floor joists to the steel plates, I assume using joist hangers by drilling holes into the flitch plate and screwing in.
Does anyone know of a better way of going about this or does this method seem solid?

Mark Hammond

05:15PM | 08/04/02
Member Since: 05/09/01
246 lifetime posts
Hey DG,
You are talking about an awful lot of work for a patch job. I am thinking that it would be much better to replace the whole girder using some of your techniques than just piecing it back together. I think that you can do it your way but first I would approach the building dept. and tell them your plan. They will tell you if you can even do it your way at all. Safety is their main issue and a solid replacement is much safer than a patch no matter how good. Still your call. Good luck......Mark Hammond

DGFalk

12:45PM | 08/06/02
Member Since: 07/28/02
5 lifetime posts
Right again Mark. Here's my contractor's new plan: we'll be reinforcing the entire length of the girders with a steel L plate and new wood, from foundation pocket to foundation pocket. The rotten portion of the girders will be removed and replaced with new pressure treated lumber.
I had been thinking replacing the wide plank heart pine flooring in the center hall (a previous owner had allowed someone to take a circular saw to a portion of it to gain access below, don't ask me why). It should make things easier... pulling up the boards when he's ready to put the steel L beams in place. He'll place the L beams on the hall-side of each girder, and the overhanging L portion will pick up the floor joists running off the girders to the sides of the house. This way we won't have to cut through the floor joist tenons. What do you think? ... The building inspector seems baffled, but we have our permit.
thanks for the reply.

Mark Hammond

05:27PM | 08/07/02
Member Since: 05/09/01
246 lifetime posts
DG,
it sounds like a plan. The best part is that you won't have to do this job twice. Glad to be of assistance. Good luck......Mark
Click_to_reply_button
Inspiration_banner

INSPIRATION GALLERY



Post a reply as Anonymous

Photo must be in JPG, GIF or PNG format and less than 5MB.

Reply_choose_button

Anonymous

Post_new_button or Login_button
Register

First dress up your metal shelves with a coat of paint in an accent color that complements your kitchen decor. Then arrang... Filling an underutilized area beneath the stairs is a smart way to save space. Doing so with a stash of wood, however, is ... The Audubon Society inspired wallpaper in this Adirondack-styled entryway will get you in the outdoor mood. Grab your coat... Chalkboard paint opens up endless possibilities for customizing your dresser time and time again. Use chalk to label the c... A fireplace in the bathroom creates the ultimate setting for relaxation. Homeowners often choose electric or gas over wood... Yes, a freestanding garage can become its own tiny house. Artist Michelle de la Vega has all the comforts of a modern resi... There’s nothing like a new set of cabinet hardware to refresh a room. The possibilities are endless: Go modern, rustic, or... FLOR carpet tiles are a simple and affordable way to customize a floor covering for any space. You can make anything from ... Chalkboard paint features prominently in this elegant yet unpretentious headboard design. Add a new message daily to reflec... Salvaged boards in varying widths and colors make up the dramatic accent wall in this attic space. The high-gloss white of... The indecisive homeowner need not fret over choosing one (or even two) cabinet colors. The kitchen cabinets in this artist... Incorporate nature into your lighting scheme by securing a dead tree in a concrete mold and draping your pendant lamp from... Simple and striking, a couple of pieces of "lovingly used" furniture creates a special kind of charm. A weathered chair fo... The Infinite Artisan Fire Bowl from Eldorado Outdoor is made from glass-fiber reinforced concrete, and offered in Oak Barr... The vibrant green of Granny Smith apples make a beautifully natural alternative to the traditional evergreen wreath. Brigh...
Follow_banner_a
Newsletter_icon Google_plus Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Rss_icon
 
webapp2