COMMUNITY FORUM

fragasaurus

11:54AM | 06/09/04
Member Since: 12/01/02
93 lifetime posts
Bvbasement
When a footer is used in conjunction with a basement or crawlspace, a drain is certainly required. In the case of a footer used in conjunction with a frost wall and slab (for a garage for example) is a drain required on the footer? In my situation, putting the drain on the footer is not the problem however running it to daylight presents several issues. Curious as to what function the drain would serve in the case of a footer set at 42" below grade and a slab foundation on grade.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

homebild

07:22PM | 06/09/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
694 lifetime posts
Code says an exterior footing drain is only required when the finished floor is below grade.

Put another way, if the finished floor of the crawl space or basement or garage floor is above the exterior grade, no footing drain is required.

Or put another way, if the finished floor of the garage floor, or crawlspace, or basement is below grade, you must have an exterior drain system.

Exterior drains systems should be preferrably gravity sloped to daylight or mechanically emptied as required.

fragasaurus

05:24AM | 06/10/04
Member Since: 12/01/02
93 lifetime posts
Thanks Homebild. Makes sense.

Glenn Good

09:32AM | 06/10/04
Member Since: 09/10/03
320 lifetime posts
homebild,

It would be a great help if you would let everyone know which code and for what local you are referring to. The building codes do vary a great deal across the country.

Moderator: Construction Systems, Foundations, and Masonry & Stone

For more information about me and/or my qualifications please visit my website at:

www.consultationdirect.com

homebild

10:02PM | 06/11/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
694 lifetime posts
The ICC (International Codes Council) IRC (International Residential Code) used in most US States.

If you know of any code that contradicts my advice then post it.

Anonymous

09:30PM | 06/12/04
homebild,

You are incorrect in the statement that "building codes don't vary much any more". The local building codes vary a great deal around the country. This is due mostly to geological conditions (prone to earthquake, mudslides, high water table, etc), severe weather activity (areas prone to tornadoes and/or hurricanes, temperature range, etc.), and many other factors that do not remain constant across the country.

While the National Building code is followed by most states and locals it is only a starting point. The local building codes can and often are altered to take other local factors into account. Generally speaking they are more stringent. The IRC is mainly used as the base line code and is often added to.

I would also appreciate it if the tone of your future replies to my postings does not contain the challenging tone of the one above. I will not allow this board to be turned into a contest. When I post something on this board it is for good reason. I did not challenge your post I only asked you to clarify your statement by including the code you were referencing. It is very important that all code issues be kept clear and concise on this board so there is no misunderstanding.


Glenn Good

09:34PM | 06/12/04
Member Since: 09/10/03
320 lifetime posts
homebild,

You are incorrect in the statement that "building codes don't vary much any more". The local building codes vary a great deal around the country. This is due mostly to geological conditions (prone to earthquake, mudslides, high water table, etc), severe weather activity (areas prone to tornadoes and/or hurricanes, temperature range, etc.), and many other factors that do not remain constant across the country.

While the National Building code is followed by most states and locals it is only a starting point. The local building codes can and often are altered to take other local factors into account. Generally speaking they are more stringent. The IRC is mainly used as the base line code and is often added to.

I would also appreciate it if the tone of your future replies to my postings does not contain the challenging tone of the one above. I will not allow this board to be turned into a contest. When I post something on this board it is for good reason. I did not challenge your post I only asked you to clarify your statement by including the code you were referencing. It is very important that all code issues be kept clear and concise on this board so there is no misunderstanding.

Glenn

Moderator: Construction Systems, Foundations, and Masonry & Stone

For more information about me and/or my qualifications please visit my website at:

www.consultationdirect.com

kirkussent

11:09AM | 06/15/04
Member Since: 05/03/04
8 lifetime posts
The UBC is used in California

Piffin

06:54PM | 06/15/04
Member Since: 11/06/02
1284 lifetime posts
"Curious as to what function the drain would serve in the case of a footer set at 42" below grade and a slab foundation on grade."

I have spent most of my thirty some year buildfing career in areas not covered by codes but where builders strive to do the best work possible without govt oversight.

Codes serve as a minimum guidline in many instances and as Glenn noted, they vary considerably according to local needs.

There are a great many unstable soils in the world which are made more so by water as it comes and goes. Rising water tabn;les can cause hydrostatic pressure from under a dwelling that can heave slabs, add moisture to interiors, lift flooring finishes, etc. The best solution is prevention.

I understand that in many midwest areas especially, that ground water can and does often rise and fall in cases such as you describe. A grid of perforated drains is laid within that leads to a sump pit where water can mechanically be removed from the soil and sub-slab so as not to allow it to damage the home.

I have seen homes moved by hydrostatic pressure when drainage is neglected. There are few locations, in my opinion where it is wise to totally ignore drainage when there is any possible way to do it. Daylight drains are not the only option. Sumps and drywells can help also..

Excellence is its own reward!


fragasaurus

09:18AM | 06/17/04
Member Since: 12/01/02
93 lifetime posts
Piffin,

Thanks once again for your insight. We are building on ledge and it is likely that we will pin the footings so hopefully the soils will not come into play negatively in this case. The water table for most of this site is over 300 feet so hopefully a rising table is also not a problem. I think we are just looking at ground water.

Thanks again,

Jonathan
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