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tpadg1

03:36PM | 10/14/04
Member Since: 10/13/04
5 lifetime posts
Bvtools
I have just purchased my first table saw and am just getting it set up.

After installing the cast iron wings the table is not absolutely flat across the main table to the ends of the wings. Each wing is about 1/16" lower then the main table surface. This is a fairly expensive "hybrid" model so I was expecting an absolute flat surface.

Since this is my first table saw I'm not sure what to expect. Is this level of flatness typical of most saws at this level? If so, I'm thinking I'll shim the bottom edge where the main table and wing join and raise and fix the issue unless someone has a better solution?

Thanks for your help..........

k2

07:28PM | 10/14/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Greetings tpadg1,

Congratulations on your first table saw!

It'd be great to think that one's table saw quickly becomes your shop standard for "flat." But my experience is that "flat", like "square", "straight", "plumb", "level" (and maybe a couple of other measures) is a matter of degree, unfortunately.

You don't mention much about your table saw, but I am assuming a "contractor's" model. I have one of those myself, a Jet, maybe 7 or 8 years old.

There are, of course, tolerances in machining from brand to brand and maybe even model to model. I wonder if some "sag" might even be intentional (to reduce binding the blade). The higher-end models usually don't have "wings" but have an entire machined surface--flatter I'm sure--but perfect? Probably not.

I think that "perfection" is relative, and if it gets the job done, it might just be good enough for all but the most exacting work. I know in my case, that I do have the most success when I keep mine cleaned, lubed and adjusted as I go.

So my opinion... learn the saw; learn tricks and techniques (there are a gazillion); use good safety practices; and have fun with it! Shim if you must, but I don't think that's the main thing. Fire it up, and enjoy the qualities and that sweet whine that only a table saw can produce!

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

tpadg1

09:55AM | 10/15/04
Member Since: 10/13/04
5 lifetime posts
Thanks for your comments k2.

My saw is the recently released Craftsman "hybrid" designed to compete with the Delta, Jet, etc., saws that fit between a contractor and full cabinet saw. It has a Biesemeyer fence and bit more power then the norm. The price point is comparible with it's competition.

As you say, I'm sure the saw will do everything I am capable of testing it with and I will enjoy it.

Thanks again.

k2

11:52AM | 10/15/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hi again tpadg1,

You're very welcome! I'm not familiar with the saw, but it sounds great from what you describe. Does it have a "convertible" motor (works on either 110 or 220)?

That was one of the things that drew me to mine years ago. I eventually did get 220v brought out to it...and it's definitely "happier." Great for ripping hardwoods.

Biesemeyer fence! Craftsman saws have apparently come a long way. You should enjoy that for many years to come.

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

tpadg1

02:05PM | 10/15/04
Member Since: 10/13/04
5 lifetime posts
Hi k2,

Yes it does have a convertable motor but I'll be using it initally on 120. I'm sure I won't tax the saw for a while since I'm just starting.

The Biesemeyer fence was one of the selling points for me. If nothing else the fence is a beautifull piece of work!

It'll be fun learning how to use the tool.

carl21l

08:18PM | 10/16/04
Member Since: 03/21/04
173 lifetime posts
a trick I used when installing the wings on my contractor saw was to turn the saw upside down on a piece of 3/4 inch mdf. when the bolts holding the wings were tightened, the wings were level with the main table top. I think the 1/16 inch you are seeing is the same as I saw, which is due to the tolerances of the bolt holes to the bolt diameter.

Carl

tpadg1

11:49AM | 10/17/04
Member Since: 10/13/04
5 lifetime posts
Hi Carl,

Thanks for the input.

Given that the saw weighs about 400lbs I'm not able to move it that easily so I guess I'll try the shim route and live with the results.

As I said previously, I'm sure the little bit it is off now won't effect anything I'm going to be building. Just my overly detailed personality trying to get it "perfect" before installing the fence!

Thanks again.
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