COMMUNITY FORUM

lzk444

05:08AM | 11/22/04
Member Since: 08/26/04
11 lifetime posts
Bvtools
Hello,

We recently bought a home, and the need to get things done around the house are never ending. I need to get some minor framing done (cutting 2x4's), and I also need to cut some metal shelving brackets. I was thinking of getting a plain old hack-saw and another wood saw, but I thought I might as well get a powered (cordless or corded) one. But I can't decide between a reciprocating or a jig saw (or maybe handheld circular). Which of these is most versatile/useful one for light-duty housework? I want to buy just one power saw and get the most uses out of it. The guy at HD said buy a cordless jig saw, not reciprocating. Just wondering if other people had opinions/ideas?

Thanks

lzk


k2

05:19AM | 11/22/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hi lzk,

Welcome to the wonderful world of home ownership! By the way, you're right, the things to be done are never ending! It's like painting a ship!

I'll kick this off by saying that I'd caution against a reciprocating saw--at least until you get into your first bigger remodeling project. These are more for heavy-duty tearout. There is not a whole lot of precision capable with those things.

Hacksaw? Sure, everyone needs one now and then. You definitely can use a jigsaw with a metal cutting blade (on a slow speed) to cut metal if you have a jigsaw, though.

If I had just one saw to buy, and if 2x4s were in the picture, I'd get a circular saw of some kind. If you don't plan on using very often, I'd start with a corded (110v) one. If you think you'll use quite a bit, consider a quality cordless 18v circular saw--but these are a lot more money.

I suggest starting with a 110v corded, then graduate to the cordless down-the-road. Those who read these threads often enough know that I say there's no harm in having both. The 110 will go all day long and cut with lots of oooomph. A lot of times I'll have a 'rough cut' blade on the 110v and use the cordless for simple cuts.

Other opinions out there?

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

lzk444

09:09AM | 11/22/04
Member Since: 08/26/04
11 lifetime posts
Thanks for your reply. I was surfing around some more and I found that Black and Decker makes a combination power hand-saw/jig-saw called Navigator SC500. It does seem a bit underpowered, but I think it might suffice for now. Anybody used this saw?

See Link:

http://www.blackanddecker.com/productguide/ProductDetail.aspx?PID=3818&RHID=901&P=ProductDetail.aspx&ATT=AttachmentDetail.aspx&ACC=AccessoryDetail.aspx&ACS=AccessoySet.aspx&R=ProductListByType.aspx

Thanks again

lzk


k2

09:53AM | 11/22/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hi again lzk,

This was the first I've seen of it. Hopefully someone else might've tried it and will post a reply.

Just from my personal experience, I don't think you'd go wrong with a circular saw. A good carbide blade for it is inexpensive and will last a long time. I know in my case, the number of straight (circular saw) cuts I make is at least 10 times the number of curved (jig saw) cuts. And a circular saw will cut through a 2x4 in no time flat.

Jig saws also eat through blades faster so this is a consideration. I'm not familiar with the "Navigator" but I'd take a look at the cost of replacement blades before making a final decision.

If you do get a circular saw, be sure and learn some good safety habits. One of the least understood is the need to keep any part of your body away from the rear of the saw! The blade can bind or catch on your work--sending the saw straight back (with guard still up) over anything in its immediate path. This can happen with cordless saws as well.

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

tperez

03:32PM | 11/22/04
Member Since: 09/24/04
128 lifetime posts
That B&D looks pretty inovative, but it also looks quite odd and cumbersome. I would really suggest you invest into two saws. The right tool for the job not only makes the job easier, it makes it safer. Check garage sales in your area for someone selling tools. Invest in a homeowners grade tool and not the professional grade. For the price of a pro tool you can probably get the two saws you want. If you must get one saw, get a Jig Saw. They are more versatile than you think and can get into pretty tight spaces. Accuracy suffers a bit with a Jig Saw, but you will be able to cut curves so use a hand saw to cut your 2x4s or borrow a circular saw.

U.S.M.C. Semper Fi !!!

lzk444

08:52AM | 11/23/04
Member Since: 08/26/04
11 lifetime posts
Thanks. I checked out jig-saws and found several kinds: with orbital motion, with scrolling etc. Are these essential? Also is 3.5 Amp power jig-saw enough?

lzk

tperez

07:44AM | 11/24/04
Member Since: 09/24/04
128 lifetime posts
I find that the orbital and scrolling features are not much more than a gimmick. I have a basic BD jig saw and it does everything I ask it to. I have cut into Door Jambs,Counter Tops for sink installs, Hardi plank, Flooring, Allthread, Copper Pipe,EMT, Almost any surface I have tried it worked.

I also mount my Jig saw to the Jig saw table with a scroll blade and I do some more intricate scroll cutting.

A 3.5 amp saw would be just fine. It will handle any cutting job you ask. Mine is actually a 2.2 amp.

Get variable speed and several different types of blades.

U.S.M.C. Semper Fi !!!
Click_to_reply_button Inspiration_banner

INSPIRATION GALLERY



Post a reply as Anonymous

Photo must be in JPG, GIF or PNG format and less than 5MB.

Reply_choose_button

captcha
type the code from the image

Anonymous

Post_new_button or Login_button
Register

Follow_banner_a
Newsletter_icon Google_plus Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Rss_icon
 
webapp1