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ballark

11:51AM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 01/19/04
5 lifetime posts
Bvlawn
I am putting in a deck. A portion of it is 24" high, the rest will be 8" high. I'm using 2x6 joists, and double 2x6 boards for beams.

My question is, what size wood do I need to use for the ledger along the house? For the lower portion of the deck, the ledger will be attached to the concrete foundation of the house.

Can I do 2x6, or does it have to be 2x12? How far above the ground should the bottom of the ledger be? And what kind of flashing should I use on top of the ledger, since I have the newer pressure treated wood?

Thanks.

Altereagle

04:24PM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 12/27/02
543 lifetime posts
2x6 P.Treated bolted as / the size of your deck.

It should be 6-8 inches above grade ideally, but you can get ground contact PT that can be placed closer.

You want a flashing that won't react with the larger copper content of the treatment. So zinc coated, stainless, or a membrane like ice & water shield for example dependent on the application & type of siding.. you could space the ledger with blocking as well, there by not needing the flashing and allowing airflow.

It all is dependent on the type of exterior wall finish as to what approach you will take for flashing or spacing.

There are a few details on the decks-ca site.

http://www.altereagle.com/

http://decks-ca.com

http://kingofcrown.com

Alter Eagle Construction & Design

Piffin

05:06PM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
You have not provided enough information to size the ledger safely. It depends on the size of the deck, the required live loads form snow etc in your area, and the type of wall and attachment methods you plan to use.

But why worry about the ledger?

Unless you are building a deck less than six feet wide, your joists planned are too samll. So are the beams unless the posts are less than four feet apart.

Excellence is its own reward!


Altereagle

10:47PM | 04/12/05
Member Since: 12/27/02
543 lifetime posts
..actually Pif you can go to 10' @ 12" o/c with 2x6 (but who would), that's the code minimum though. I use 2x8 at 10' and like you only go 6-7 ft with 2x6 since I use trex & ipe the most which are mucho heavier decking. :)

http://www.altereagle.com/

http://decks-ca.com

http://kingofcrown.com

Alter Eagle Construction & Design

ballark

07:33AM | 04/13/05
Member Since: 01/19/04
5 lifetime posts
I plan on using 2x6 so the deck would be low to the ground, eliminating the need for stairs or railing. You can see the plans at www.theballards.net/deckplan.jpg

Piffin

12:15PM | 04/13/05
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
alter e - that might bne the minimum allowed in siome southern states, but many places have snow laod requirements. I build with min live load of 50#/sf. Have lived in locations where 70-110# is the required.

time to pay atention to regional differences.

Ballark - most deck builders know that a deck should be 18" abov the ground to let it breathe and avoid indecent smells and premature rot. All the new composition decking products make this a part of the requirements for warranty

Excellence is its own reward!


ballark

02:14PM | 04/13/05
Member Since: 01/19/04
5 lifetime posts
I'm just a homeowner building my first deck, trying get tips from those who know. Not sure if it makes a difference, but the deck is in the SLC Utah area - quite dry generally. It's also on a slight slope, so it would be between 8" and 14" in height. Not sure if any of that makes any difference.

Piffin

02:28PM | 04/13/05
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
probably get by in dry climate

Excellence is its own reward!


Altereagle

08:12AM | 04/20/05
Member Since: 12/27/02
543 lifetime posts
There are also lumber grades, spans, species, if the lumber is wet or dry... all should be taken into account.

The code states, 40# dead load + a live load, which is 10#. Plus the possibility that your area adds on for snow.. thanks for pointing that out Piffin.

When I talk about decks and decking it's to the national codes, anything specific for your area such as Maine or our area for that matter that just went "green" you will need to refer to local codes.

When in doubt you should always refer to your local building dept or a structural engineer.

Plus on the space below a deck, you can get ground treat when you need place a deck lower than the norm. Most suppliers have it, or can get it...

http://www.altereagle.com/

http://decks-ca.com

http://kingofcrown.com

Alter Eagle Construction & Design
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