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christian15213

02:08PM | 04/19/05
Member Since: 04/13/05
9 lifetime posts
Bvlawn
Ok, plan to put a railing on my deck. However, I have a couple questions. One, should I put the railing post in through the deck and long tag screw them in... Or place them on top??? now, what aspect to take into conisderatin is that the back portion of the railing is going to be 10 feet tall because it is going to have a laticed over hanging structure on the top portion. The rest of the L shaped railing designe will be normal length. Any help or input on this would greatly be appreciated.

have fun always

k2

03:28PM | 04/19/05
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hi Christian,

I'm not a pro, but I did go through some of this same thought process for a deck we had done (professionally) last year. So this is just "one man's opinion"...hopefully others will respond as well.

I found that one drawback of lag-screwing it into the rim joists (from the side) is that--over time, it has the tendency to "push out" (esp. if people lean against it). Like yours, ours is an elevated deck and we didn't want this happening.

What we ended up doing is having metal railings put on. These screw down (into the top of joist material) and are welded at the corners. It doesn't even budge.

Is it too late to have your vertical supports carry through all the way up to the railings? (This wasn't an option for us, as ours are cantilevered somewhat.)

I am sure there are ways to do this properly either way--top or side. But I like the way ours came out.

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

christian15213

09:07PM | 04/19/05
Member Since: 04/13/05
9 lifetime posts
our deck really isn't raised it is ground level witha a joist/girder height of 12". However, my question is of another nature dealing with the railings.

not so much as on top or behind the decking. But rather, could I get away with putting the posting right in the decking, cutting the decking around it and then put some crown molding around the post???

have fun always

Altereagle

09:55PM | 04/19/05
Member Since: 12/27/02
545 lifetime posts
10 ft... you need to solid block, through bolt & use steel anchors (Simpson HD2A) for that section, the rest block & through bolt. You need to resist a lateral load 200lbs @ 36".

They just did an excellent study of the loads on a deck guards at Virgin Tech, you may find the results of the testing there?

When in doubt always refer to you local building dept. or a structural engineer.

http://www.altereagle.com/

http://decks-ca.com

http://kingofcrown.com

Alter Eagle Construction & Design

christian15213

05:02PM | 04/20/05
Member Since: 04/13/05
9 lifetime posts
Ok, I made the 10 foot posts today. I made them with 4 1x6 "apperence board" and let me tell you they came out pretty good. for those of you doing this too, a miniture crow bar and 8 or 12" clamps are an absolute must. When going to the store make sure you choose "apperance" board, which has sharp edges and is more flexible than decking wood. more over, inspect every piece you buy. We bought sixteen and inspected everyside by visuals and by placing on flat floor to make sure there was absolutley no warping. Trust me you will thank yourself in the long run. This proved to be a good thing because making them wasn't that big of a deal. First, we put two boards standing on their side and placed wood glue up and down the side. Then placed a board on top and after doing the the first board the hard way, let me tell you a shorter, easier method. when you make the first two screws at one end of the post, push outward the two side boards from the top board at the other end. it is easier to push in rather than "pull out" when it is already underneath. Believe me it makes a difference. Lastly, remember to do one end at a time, this should help keep them more flush while screwing about every foot or foot and half.

NOW, on to my problem. where I am going to put these things. I don't think at all I will have to block them in. The are pretty wide, about 6.4x8 true inches. This makes for a big area and I think two 1/2 bolts 10" should be more than enough support for these goliths? however, I could be wrong and if so, what exactly should I do??? Again, the lag screws are going trough two 2x12 joist boards.

have fun always

Altereagle

08:37AM | 04/24/05
Member Since: 12/27/02
545 lifetime posts
The fact that the posts are larger makes it more important to block, use a connector & thru -bolt. 2x12 makes very little difference, as they are only nailed to the rim, the same as a 2x8 or any framing.

You maybe should have a professional come and advise you onsite, I'd hate to see anyone get hurt.

As for covering the posts, I hope you back primed that "appearance board". I would suggest anyone that was thinking of covering their posts, use a exterior product such as advantek or prime six sides before installation, and use a treated post as it will trap moisture, and rot the post prematurely.

http://www.altereagle.com/

http://decks-ca.com

http://kingofcrown.com

Alter Eagle Construction & Design
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