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lpgriller123

06:55PM | 11/30/05
Member Since: 11/29/05
3 lifetime posts
Bvlawn
Help!!! I enjoy using my LP Gas grill. I use a two-tank-system -- I keep a spare tank ready to be used. Tonight, I ran out of gas and changed the tank so I could finish cooking supper. Everytime I do this, I can't get the normal supply of gas to the burners. I then finish cooking on only 1 burner instead of two. The burner valve is turned up to high ... but I only get about 50% of the normal heat. It seems to take a few days before I get the normal heat. This has happened the last few tank changes, too.

Why is this? Does something ice up when I unhook the old tank? Do I get moisture in the regulator? Should I replace the regualtor? Some other part?

Thanks in advance for your help. All help will be appreciated.

Jim D

10:40PM | 11/30/05
Member Since: 01/06/01
345 lifetime posts
LPGriller123 - hi, you probably have much more experience than I do with gas grills, but here's a couple thoughts to get you started...

1. Check the connection where the gas hoses connect to the burners. On my "Backyard Kitchen" gas grill, there's a way to adjust the connection to allow more or less air in there. I don't believe you want that connection totally closed off nor totally opened up. (Trtouble is, that opening leads to the next item...)

2. Check the burner assembly close to the hose connection to see if you have anything building a home in there. Even in the middle of summer, when the grill gets more use, I've seen spiders get inside there and build a sizable web in under 24 hours. That webbing will shut down gas flow quickly. For cleaning mine, the booklet said to use either a baby bottle brush or, to reach all the way back, to attach a rag to the end of a coat hangar/stiff wire. I think the lint brushes they sell that go in and clean the top-mounted lint traps on dryers would also work well.

3. Finally - how's the burners look around the openings where the gas actually burns? You may have a slight buildup of rust/carbon and they don't "open up" until after you've burned it a few times on a new tank of gas. Those holes can be opened back up and replacement burners aren't that hard to come by.

I don't think you're introducing any moisture into the regulator or anything like that. You could have a regulator that's going bad - again, a fairly easy part to replace. I hope this helps some - good luck! Jim D/West Point, VA


lpgriller123

05:10AM | 12/02/05
Member Since: 11/29/05
3 lifetime posts
Jim D -- Thanks for the reply, appreciated!

This problem is very strange, since the exact sequence of events is:

1 - I start grilling on the old tank. Both burners ON with full heat available. Life is good!

2- About 10 minutes later I notice the usual whistle of the gas through the system has halted. Opps -- I'm out of gas.

3 - I go to the garage to get the replacement tank. With practice I can change the tank in just a few minutes. The new plastic tank connectors make the job easier. Just as an interesting digression --- I learned that the material for the plastic connection is setup to melt at a relatively low temp. Apparently, the connector will melt off long before the entire tank assembly will blow up. Cleaver engineering!

4 - I light burner #1. Very low heat!!! Full on for burner #1 gives me about 40% flame and heat. Huh????

5 - I turn on burner #2 ... but the gas flow is so weak that I can't keep burner #1 going. So I go back to just one burner.

6 - Supper is delayed ... with all the accompaning yelling in the household! Life is bad!

7 - I wait for a day or two.

8 - Full flow on the gas! Both burners OK!

I also thought of the regulator ... so I replaced the regulator at the end of last season ... because I've been fighting this for a while. The regulator still looks new. It doesn't help. Could I have 2 bad regulators???

It's very difficult to understand how the situation could change in just a few minutes, but I like your idea. I'll follow the path of the gas each step of the way.

Thanks again for your help.


kbetts

07:13AM | 01/17/06
Member Since: 01/16/06
1 lifetime posts
I'm having the same trouble. Found the following:

From the Weber FAQ website:

Q. My LP gas grill won't get hotter than 250 to 300 F, even with all burners on high. Why?

Since 1995, all regulators (the part that attaches to the gas tank to regulate the flow of gas) have included a safety device that restricts the gas flow in the event of a gas leak. But, you can inadvertently activate the safety device without having a gas leak. This typically occurs if you open the LP tank valve rapidly, or if one or more of the burner control knobs is in an open position when opening the LP tank valve. If you do activate the gas regulator safety device, the grill will only reach temperatures between 250 and 300F even with all burners on the high setting. To reset the gas regulator safety device:

* Close the LP tank valve.

* Turn all burner control knobs to the OFF position.

* Disconnect the regulator from the LP tank.

* Open the lid of the grill.

* Turn burner control knobs to HIGH.

* Wait at least 1 minute.

* Turn burner control knobs OFF.

* Wait at least five minutes if the barbecue has been lit.

* Re-connect the regulator to the LP tank.

* SLOWLY turn the LP tank valve all the way open.

* With the lid open, turn the front burner control knob to the HIGH position (for Summit gas grills, turn on the left burner in the selected Heat Zone).

* Ignite the grill by pushing the crossover ignition button several times.

* After the front burner is lit, turn the middle burner control knob (if your barbecue has three burners) and then the rear burner control knob to the HIGH position. (For Summit gas grills, turn on the right burner)

* Close the barbecue lid.

* The barbecue should reach 500 to 550 degrees in 10 - 15 minutes.

To keep the regulator flow valve from tripping again, when you are done grilling always:

* Turn all burner control knobs to the OFF position

* Turn off the LP tank valve last


mavesko

10:53AM | 02/19/07
Member Since: 02/18/07
2 lifetime posts
This call all be avoided by making sure that your gas knob on the grill and on the old tank is turned off before you unhook the old tank. Next hook up the new tank. Turn on the new TANK first, allow a second or two for the line to pressurize. Now turn on the gas knob on the grill and light

lpgriller123

04:32AM | 02/20/07
Member Since: 11/29/05
3 lifetime posts
Thanks for your excellent advice -- much appreciated.

At the present time, I'm looking at 2 feet of snow on my back deck. Outdoor grilling is only a "twinkle in my eye". Oh.... those long summer evenings with the savory smell of smoke coming from the grill ... Steak ... bratwurst ... chicken ... fish, too! It won't be long now!

What a clever bunch of engineers to look after my safety with a leak detector built into the system!

Thanks again for the solution to my problem.

Grill on!!!!
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