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roseombre

05:12PM | 05/07/07
Member Since: 05/06/07
2 lifetime posts
Bvlawn
I need some detailed information about securing a patio door. I'm talking about fixing the doors so they can't be lifted off the track. I'm an old lady so talk to me like I'm 5 years old please. I read somewhere about placing screws into the track but I don't understand how that works or even just where the screws are to go. And then wouldn't I have to take the doors off the track to get the screws in there? I'm afraid I couldn't then be able to get the doors back up. Also the shim that was mentioned. Just where would that thin strip of wood be nailed? Oh, and which door is the one that could be lifted off the track?? Is it the stationary one? Please help

Altereagle

08:46PM | 05/07/07
Member Since: 12/27/02
545 lifetime posts
You have a number of options.

But if it's a sliding door they can just break the glass.

Anyway, the pin locks would be the best for you, it sounds like the door was installed backwards. If you can lift it out from the outside than it is installed wrong.

Look at the Mag Engineering and Manufacturing site. I think they have the cam type pins locks for patio doors.

Here is a picture of one that would go into the top corners of the doors, you drill through the first door into the 2nd door with a 1/4 bit (if I recall right). Then screw this on and simply slide it into the hole, hopefully you can catch the track but that depends on the door manufacturer.

Other types work the same way but are put at the bottom... I like the top variety, it should have some directions on the package, most sliders have a corner bracket that you need to get between that and the glass.

A neighborhood handy man should be able to do it in less than an hrs and the pin is only about 6 bucks. Biggest bang for the dollar though. ;)

Hope this helps?

Alter Eagle Construction & Design

http://www.altereagle.com/ | Construction & Design | http://decks-ca.com/ | Decks, California outdoor living | http://kingofcrown.com/ | Molding and finishing | http://installcrown.com/ | Crown tutorial


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mattburr

08:17AM | 06/09/07
Member Since: 03/20/06
33 lifetime posts
MOST NEWER PATIO DOOR MANUFACTURERS USE A FEATURE CALLED A ANTI-LIFT FEATURE WHICH PROHIBITS THE OPERATING PANEL OF A SLIDING PATIO DOOR FROM BEING LIFTED OFF THE TRACK UNLESS IT IS IN A CERTAIN POSITION ON THE TRACK. YOU MIGHT LOOK INTO INSTALLING A FOOTBOLT ON THE BOTTOM WHICH WILL PREVENT SLIDING PANEL FROM MOVING AT ALL. BUT LIKE PREVIOUS POST IF SOMEONE WANTS IN BAD ENOUGH ALL THEY HAVE TO DO IS BREAK THE GLASS.

THANKS,

MATTHEW BURR

BUYER - WINDOWS AND DOORS

VILLAGE HOME CENTER / dba COOPER BUILDING MATERIALS

4650 HIGHWAY 7 NORTH

HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE, AR 71909

EMAIL: MBURR@CBMCCI.COM

roseombre

09:08AM | 06/09/07
Member Since: 05/06/07
2 lifetime posts
I've looked at many products since posting my question. One research gave me enough information that upon reflection my neighbor and I solved the problem and it didn't take any drilling, screwing, or modifications to the door or hardware and I want to share this with this board and all women who live alone.

We found a small screw driver that would fit in the area between the door and the top of the frame and stuck it in that space. One on both sides of the door. And guess what??? The door still slides without a problem but you CAN'T lift it out of the frame.

Of course it doesn't have to be a screw driver, it could be anything plastic or metal that would fit in that space.

Thank you all for the responses to my original question.
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