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InshpectorJ

11:55AM | 04/20/03
Member Since: 04/19/03
2 lifetime posts
Bvplumbing
Hi to everyone. Bob, or anyone who has the knowledge, I hope you can help, please help me!

Ill try to make a very long story asap, [as short as possible] for everyones sake, because its getting crazy over here! APT. refers to the garage studio room from now on, ok?? :}

I have a drawing available of the situation. Maybe that can help everyone concerned get a visualization of these problems with this DWV setup. Dont know how to upload it though so I guess email is the only way??

Ok, I believe this used to be a garage that someone made into a room with bathroom, kitchen, etc., like a studio to rent out... The shower one day fills up. This is the lowest fixture/drain, I believe, that connects to a galvanized 1 1/2" branch drain running underground to the soil stack in front of house. Now this shower fills up with water when your using the actual kitchen sink, the apt. bathroom sink, and/or the apt. kitchen sink.:{ All these fixtures in the apt. room are directly on the other side of the wall in which I face and explain the situation from.[This shower did this 1 time a year ago, and a 75 ft. snake was needed to free the drain.] Now it happened again when I tried to drain my washer into the same line that ALL of the above are connected too. Again the same snake was deployed and it DID free the foul, extremely toxic and stinky deadly sewer water. YUK!!

THE PROBLEM I NOTICED NOW is when I tested the washer spin/ drain cycle again, the shower still fills up, and has to slowly drain away. There still is a bad smell and its not cool, because I smell it in my living room. My moms says there is not a trap under there. She has worked with the tiling on the shower floor. Ok guys here are the questions!!!!!!!!!

1. Looking at the roof, I see only 2, 1 1/2" vent stacks, I think the main roof stack was too far to tap into. Also, I DO know now that the other stack, in which Ill hardly speak of probably, is most likely dedicated to my actual/ main kitchen sink. Heres that question-
Do you think these vent stacks run by themselves straight to the roof, or do you think they connect to my main roof stack ALSO, which is pretty far away in distance? Isnt this why they ran these 1 1/2 inch "secondary stacks" on this side of the house, vertically, to avoid the hassle of connecting to the main stack?? I see different diagrams and am confused about this.

2. I dont know if I connected the washers standpipe to this drain line high enough. The standpipe I connected is very tall however, dont get me wrong, but does it matter how high it connects to the secondary stack/ drain line? It connects at the far high end of a "horizontal" drain line that slopes downward towards the left, then hooks up with the apt. bathroom sink, [DIRECTLY ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WALL], then finally joins with the metal 1 1/2 secondary vertical stack via sanitary fitting. This goes straight upwards, through the roof and also serves of course as the branch drain going downwards into the ground. That isnt all, stay focused guys!

Now refering to the same thing, directly under the sanitary fitting in which the washer discharge and APT. bathroom sink are draining into this 1 1/2" stack, without any spacing between the 2, there is ANOTHER SANITARY FITTING, allowing the APT. kitchens sink to drain also. Now this drain line is sloping downwards towards the right and I can see it is sloping more than normal, to connect to the lower sanitary fitting on the 1 1/2 stack. Remember, stack is in middle, Apt. kitchen sink located leftside of stack is sloping downwards to stack. And then to the rightside of the stack, there is also the washer standpipe and then the Apt. bathroom sink, draining and sloping downwards of course, to the sanitary t fitting which is directly on top of the other one. "SHWEW" This is going to be hard and I am trying to be descriptive but also as simple as possible. Please bear with me. :}

I failed to explain the actual kitchen sinks drain connection didnt I? Well its is on the wall to the left, pretty far away, but IT DOES ALSO USE THIS SAME STACK TO DRAIN INTO. Above this fixture is where the other vent stack is, its not directly above the kitchen sink, the main kitchen sink that is, but towards the right a bit. I think because I the window that is located above the kitchen sink, how could one run a vent stack in a wall if a window is located right there, which brings up another question, ahh. Here it is-

3.Does secondary venting have to run vertically upwards "inline" with the fixtures drain or p trap or anything like that?

4.I read alot that "As with other wet-vented drains, the standpipes pipe must enter the drainpipe above the highest fixture drain."
I want to know if this is only for standpipes or all pipes being connected to an existing drainpipe? Also, WHAT IS CONSIDERED THE HIGHEST FIXTURE DRAIN anyways? Are they talking about the drain that you see in your sink, when looking down while brushing your teeth, or are they talking about pipe beyond the sink trap and where ever it might connect to the horizontal, sloping drain pipe? Damn I dont even know how to explain this one, this is a SINGLE STORY HOME REMEMBER.

5. I am currently uncovering whats underneath the showers flooring, because I need to atleast install a trap because it stinks. I hope I am doing the right thing, and hope it isnt because of the way I introduced and connected the washers draining pipe to what was in front of my face. Now I know for a fact that the toilet in this apt. bathroom has a seperate huge, pvc drainpipe sloping to the stack. It runs underneath the shower there and it is the only fixture on it. I dont know if it needs a vent stack, does it? How big does the vent stack have to be if so? What should I connect to this drain pipe to make things right? I was thinking the washers discharge because my washer drain a high volume of water it seems. Well actually, I guess the way it is right now would be just fine, except my shower in the apt room wants to fill up with water, why you ask, IDONTKNOW!!! I have to go but will be checking up. Need to develop pics and relax. Hope the someone is nice enough to take time to help a stranger out. I would never forget about that!:}

David, 24, Las Vegas.

jimrox

06:04PM | 04/23/03
Member Since: 04/01/03
26 lifetime posts
WOW...
Have you tried clearing the drain out to the street? From what I could retain from you're message, it sounds like you might have a blockage further down line and the run to your apt. shower might be holding the sewage from the entire house till it slowly drains out. Roots, seperated pipe etc. might be your problem, might be worth your while to have your line inspected by camera. Anyway it would be in your best interest to have a pro plumber out, sewege carries a lot of nasty crap (pardon the pun) and can pose a serious health issue. good luck

InshpectorJ

06:05AM | 04/24/03
Member Since: 04/19/03
2 lifetime posts
here is an image of whats going on, http://hometown.aol.com/seraloo/myhomepage/index.html
check it out and help me find a solution, please...

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