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lonepine

07:51AM | 09/27/03
Member Since: 09/26/03
5 lifetime posts
Bvplumbing
We moved into this house 4.5 years ago. The house is about 26 years old.

In the past week (last night and last Tuesday), we had lots of rains. The basement near the sump pump area got flooded. The water came out from the two little holes of the sump pump. The two holes (about .25 inch in diameter) are located in the vertical pipe, under the motor and above the T conjunction (of the pump's vertical pipe and the horizontal drain pipe leading towards the basement wall/outside). The holes are in the opposite direction of each other. Are they designed to be like that?

The "leaking" occurred a few times in the past few years. Due to the fact that it was not serious, I did not pay much attention. The problem in the past week seemed very serious, lots of water in basement. I think something is totally wrong.

I searched the messages under the Plumbing here, and did some diagnosis. The drain pipe is not blocked. The float seems to work fine. The pump can start and stop by itself. Water can come out of the drain pipe. It APPEARs that the pump does not have enough horse power to push the water out of the pipe, quick enough. Since I am not an expert on this, could someone help? I greatly appreciate your kindness.

Some information on the sump pump - Sump Pump Duty from Emerson Motor Division, St. Louis MO
Model S55NXEKJ-3043
H.P. 1/3
R.P.M. 3450
S.I. 1.0
PH 1
Code N
A. 6.1
Thermally Protected

Another thing I noticed that's different is that the top of our sump pump is sealed with concrete, leveled with basement floor. I can only see the vertical pipe sticking out, along with a thin rubber pipe (I think that functions as a switch or float. But not sure). This makes impossible to look inside the sump. Is this commonly seen?

Is it time to call a plumber or I can solve the problem (with your inputs) ?

Sorry for the long note. Thank you so much for your attention.

Haiwei


plumber Tom

10:14AM | 09/27/03
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
I think the 1/4" holes you are referring to are to drain back the water that is left in the pipe between the check valve and the pump itself. This is normal. 1/3 HP should be ample enough to pump out the water with a substantial and noticeable force. If it seems slow, or intermittent, then the impeller may be worn, or the pump may be partially clogged. Check the size of the discharge pipe. It's commonly 1-1/4". The concrete sump cover may have been installed, as a safety measure so nobody steps in the hole. You definately need access to the sump pit, so I would find a way to remove the cover,(smash if necessary) and replace with a rigid ABS or some other hard poly lid, that you can access. Here's a web site that specializes in pumps www.libertypumps.com

[This message has been edited by plumber Tom (edited September 27, 2003).]

lonepine

10:35AM | 09/27/03
Member Since: 09/26/03
5 lifetime posts
Thanks Tom for your reply. A plumber came and said the pump (DryMaster) is malfunctioning due to a worn seal in shaft assembly. He (his company) asks for $634 to replace the pump. He said the new pump would cost about $250-280. He said our sump pump (DryMaster) is different from normal pumps - it needs adjustment during the installation.

Is this an OK deal? Over $600 for the pump and installation seems too expensive. Can you give me some advice?

I checked the drain pipe. It is not clogged. Water does come out of the pipe. The problem is that when the pump is pumping water, water comes out of the two small holes, a lot of water.

Could you advise? Thanks a lot for your help.

Haiwei

plumber Tom

12:31PM | 09/27/03
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
That price sounds very expensive to me also! The only helpful advice I can give to you is: Purchase the pump, and a new check valve yourself. Hire a reputable plumber (One that you, or family or friends have used in the past) If you supply the material, the pump and the check valve, then the plumber only charges you for his labor. Get a good cast-iron bodied pump. Some good names are: Zohler, Liberty and Hydromatic. The hydromatic is what I would personally install. It's a good quality sump pump, made in Ashland, Ohio. I don't know where you live, but if I was doing the job, I would charge you $400.00 to 450.00. Alot of companies charge outrageous mark-ups on materials. Hope this advice helped some, and best of luck to you.... Tom Just checked www.hydromatic.com unfortunately the pumps are only available wholesale. There's one more thing you can try: Contact some basement waterproofing companies (look in the yellow pages under "waterproofing") And try to get a lower price on a pump install.

[This message has been edited by plumber Tom (edited September 27, 2003).]

lonepine

12:41PM | 09/27/03
Member Since: 09/26/03
5 lifetime posts
Thanks again, Tom.

The plumber did not say or hint whether he would need to smash the concrete (the cover) in the installation. I thought he would not need to do so as he said the pump is somehow different - DryMaster style ( I am not sure I really understand this kind of pump; I searched the web but did not get info on it).

Did you mean that I or the plumber has to smash the concrete cover to get to the pit? It seems to be a big project, though I am not sure.

I just opened the pump, disconnected the discharge pipe, looking for any apparent problem there.

I am not sure about the two way check valve (?). It does not look good to me. Can it cause the water leaking problem that I have?

I will go to home depot to get a new one. And see whether the problem will occur again.

Thanks again for your kind help.

Haiwei

plumber Tom

12:53PM | 09/27/03
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
Ok If you can get to the pump, that's fine. I was under the impression that the lid was cemented on. As long as there is access to get to the pump your OK. The check valve is basically a flapper type valve that stops any water from coming back, after the pump shuts off. This should not be causing your problem, it's just a good idea to install a new one when you change the pump. They are not that expensive.

lonepine

02:12PM | 09/27/03
Member Since: 09/26/03
5 lifetime posts
I meant to open the motor, not the pump, the things that on top of the floor. I cannot see the pit.

I just bought a new check valve, and put it on. I cannot really test it as the pit doesn't seem to have much water in it. Turn on the motor to the "Test" option, the motor ran but no water pumping out of the drain.

I might use the garden hose to pour some water next to the outside basement wall or wait for the next rain. If this does not fix the problem (probably won't), I will have the pump repaced. I will keep you updated on the progress.

Thanks so much for your thoughts. I really appreciate it.

Haiwei

cellarwater

11:01AM | 12/13/03
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Dear Lonepine I take it youre near Detroit. Here's the magic ten digits 313-255-3930.This calls Watermaster the pumps manufacturer.They can help you with your pump.

lonepine

01:13PM | 12/13/03
Member Since: 09/26/03
5 lifetime posts
Yes. I live in suburban Detroit. About four weeks ago, I bought a new sump pumper (water master DM-4) from the manufacturer located in Redford Michigan. It cost $355 plus tax. I installed in by myself. It took me about 20 minutes. The pit and the sump pumper are totally a different design/style from the normal ones.

I learned from this small project. I'd like to thank this board and those who responded to my questions. God bless!

Lonepine

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