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bchang74

11:01AM | 03/17/04
Member Since: 05/28/03
6 lifetime posts
Bvplumbing
Hey Everybody...

This may be a stupid question, but.....

I live in a high rise (8th floor of 28 total floors) and am renovating my bathroom.

In our current bathroom, hot / cold water supply lines and pipe which drains the sink come in from the side of the bathroom cabinet. The current sink sits ~18 inches from the wall.

I would like to buy a larger bathroom cabinet and move the sink 10.5 inches further away from the wall. (So, the new sink would be 27.5 inches from the wall). Can I do this by simply buying longer supply lines and making the pipe which would drain the new sink longer by 10 inches?

Or would extending the length of the pipe cause trouble?

Once again, I'm not really a plumber, so any help is appreciated!

Thanks in advance,

Ben

plumber Tom

12:27PM | 03/17/04
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
I don't see a problem with it Ben. As long as you maintain the proper pitch on the drain line (1/4" per foot) The tailpiece coming off the pop-up drain assembly may neeed to be extended or shortened depending on the new sink drain height.

bchang74

09:22AM | 03/18/04
Member Since: 05/28/03
6 lifetime posts
Dear Plumber Tom,

Thanks for your quick answer.

One more stupid question, if I do move the sink over 10 inches, and I include another 1/4 inch of rise in the drain pipe, how do I connect the new drain pipe to the drain pipe in the wall....won't the new drain pipe be coming in at an angle because of the 1/4 inch of rise?

thanks again,

ben

plumber Tom

11:10AM | 03/18/04
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
It's hard to give you an accurate answer over the web without seeing what I'm facing, But I'll try. The old drain line (usually 1-1/4" for lav sinks) can be cut and you can either use a coupling and/or 2 45*s to make your connection.90 degree bends are not recommended for drainage. A trap adapter is also handy to have installed. Remember the size of the chrome traps are tubular in diameter.This means that the OD of the tubular fits inside the ID of the copper. You may be able to buy tubular slip joint fittings (they are chromed) They make couplings and 45*s in tubular. If this still doesn't all make sense, post back and tell me what exactly is stubbed out of the wall and I'll try to help you further.

bchang74

12:21PM | 03/18/04
Member Since: 05/28/03
6 lifetime posts
Dear Plumber Tom,

Thanks for replying again....I think that I understand what you are saying!


MikeA088

04:30PM | 03/25/04
Member Since: 03/24/04
2 lifetime posts
I have a very similar problem. I am remodeling my kitchen and I am almost done. Today I got my counter and sink installed. The sink drain center is about 7.5 inches from the wall. I want to install a disposal which is 8.5 inches wide (4.25 from edge to center). That means I have about 3.25 inches to get all of the plumbing pipes in (trap, tail pipe, etc) which I don't think is enough room (I haven't tried yet).

My question is can I put the trap in so that it points out to the side, than using a curved piece, bring the line back to the nipple in the wall. Is there a maximum length for the amount after the trap to the wall nipple?

Also, reading the instructions on the web site (http://www.insinkerator.com/pdf/H537.pdf) for the disposal it gives measurements for the trap size and thing like that. In general, are these types of things "mandatory" or "recomendation"? When installing sinks, are there standards for pipe sizes that have to be followed?

plumber Tom

06:01PM | 03/25/04
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
Yes you can curve the "J" bend of the trap to line up with your drain line. Yes you must follow the plumbing code per fixture drain pipe diameter. Your kitchen sink must be 1-1/2".

MikeA088

02:58AM | 03/26/04
Member Since: 03/24/04
2 lifetime posts
Not sure if I fully understand, sorry.

When you say "Your kitchen sink must be 1-1/2"." what do you mean. What has to be 1-1/2"?

Maybe I don't understand the reply or I probably didn't properly explain my question (either way my fault). My drain nipple is in the wall directly behind the sink but there isn't enough room from the center of the sink drain to the nipple for the disposal, trap ,tail etc. to go in a straight line. To make it fit I want to put the trap to either the left or the right of the disposal than put in a bend to bring it back to the center so that I can get to the nipple. It would be a longer pipe but I think I would be able to get everything to fit. Is that something that I can do? Will it still drain properly?

Thanks

Mike

plumber Tom

05:15PM | 03/26/04
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
The diameter of the drain line is what I was referring to. How do you know your P trap is not long enough? If you fall short you can use an extension tailpiece and you will be fine.
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