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wwwlogsandgrillsdotcom

07:37PM | 04/20/06
Member Since: 02/17/06
19 lifetime posts
It is true that copper tubing is not allowed in many places for use with natural gas.

If it is in your area, then I would imagine you have a flared fitting on the gas supply line. You need to get a flare to 3/8" fitting that should connect to your supply side portion of the quick connect fitting. That would allow you to make your connection.

Reggie

Reggie Wilson

http://www.logsandgrills.com

erik peterson

08:43AM | 04/21/06
Member Since: 06/23/03
224 lifetime posts
Original post was from june of 2003.. The reason its important to continue posts are for the multitude of others dealing with similar situations. I doubt I would post at all if it only helped a singular person particularly since most original posters dont even bother say thanks. As Ive said over the years "check your local codes". erik

Sylvan

01:47PM | 04/21/06
Member Since: 01/24/06
1449 lifetime posts
Me_office1
Does anyone take the time to say thank you

The NFPA 54 Or ANSI Z223.1 Or National Fuel Gas code? Or possibly AGA

As for black steel out doors GREAT IDEA if you like RUST and want to constantly red lead or use coal tar enamel coatings to protect it from rusting out.

I personally would check the local code about using galvanized piping out doors and It may also help if one would consider the BTU INPUT of the appliance in question and then consider the specific gravity of the Natural gas in your area AND the developed length of piping and I am sure that NO WAY would the "code" say the use of 3/8 copper is legal for Natural gas.

About "copper tubing" not good for "GAS" then I reckon every hospital job I ever completed using dehydrated copper Type K for Oxygen and Nitrous oxide lines should be removed and replaced with rubber hoses huh?

Again check your local codes and ask your natual gas supplier what is the specific gravity of the fuel they are using THEN based on this number check the local chart for the developed length and the MAXIUM BTU input.

Trying to guess on here is most likely going to get someone killed

glennbaker

10:53PM | 06/09/07
Member Since: 06/09/07
1 lifetime posts
Anyone who suggests to the DIY homeowner to use anything but standard black pipe on thier homes natural gas piping needs thier head examined. Black pipe is THE only approved material to meet code in my area. A mechanically inclined homeowner can work with it safely & sucessfully with a minimum of tools.

The average DIY homeowner is not trying to set any land speed records by short-cutting the job using copper or any other new material that is supposedly "up to code" for natural gas installations. Black pipe is inexpensive & safe. Period.

The "professional" who uses other materials on natural gas installations in order to speed the job up may be playing with fire [literally] in the long run. What happend to pride of work. Is everything tuned to making the quickest/easiest buck these days?

Glenn.

Sylvan

07:36AM | 06/10/07
Member Since: 01/24/06
1449 lifetime posts
Me_office1
Glen posted "Anyone who suggests to the DIY homeowner to use anything but standard black pipe on thier homes natural gas piping needs thier head examined. Black pipe is THE only approved material to meet code in my area."

FYI Black pipe schedule 40 is what I normally use for natural gas BUT what does one do for exposed piping then Black o pipe IS NOT the only material that can be used ( don't believe me check your own local code)

Many codes do allow the use of GALVANIZED piping and fitting rather then requiring coal tar enamel coating or insulation or painting for exposed out door applications.

Many codes do not allow the use of galvanized fittings inside a structure (if you want to know why ask me)

As plumbing professionals we know one material is not a cure all.

I do NOT use copper tubing for natural fuel BUT I have used dehydrated copper for medical gas installations and HVAC applications.
9328-tieger_plumbing

BV001255

10:36PM | 06/07/13
Check the local code about using galvanized piping out doors and It may also help if one would consider the BTU INPUT of the appliance in question and then consider the specific gravity of the Natural gas in your area AND the developed length of piping and I am sure that NO WAY would the "code" say the use of 3/8 copper is legal for Natural gas.You need to get a flare to 3/8" fitting that should connect to your supply side portion of the quick connect fitting.

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Sylvan

04:22PM | 06/10/13
Member Since: 01/24/06
1449 lifetime posts
Me_office1
No way would I use copper for natural gas other then oxygen or other medical fuels as approved by the NFPA / local codes

For out door gas piping exposed to the elements I use either black piping and fittings painted for rust protection or galvanized piping and fittings depending on local codes
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