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annalanna

09:04PM | 05/28/04
Member Since: 05/27/04
3 lifetime posts
Bvtools
We are in he midst of having a new patio cover built onto our home. This is to replace a homemade job that came with the house and was very poorly done and nailed to the facia (sp?) without joist hangers and with 3 4x4 support posts. It was cedar trellis-like 1x2 with wavy metal thrown on top and screwed down. It is being replaced with treated 6x6 posts and 2x6 pine(I don't know the word.......rafters?) framing. The underside is enclosed with 3/8 paint grade plywood. It is wired for two ceiling fans and six recessed lights. It is supposed to have a 1/12 pitch and will have torch down roof. We were really excited about it!

Our home is a 1973 brick rectangle with a hip roof. We have pine 1x6 t&g decking. Here's the problem. This is the first of three contracts we have signed for the house. The same contractor is installing 2 skylights and replacing our 3 tab with deminsionals and a ridge vent. I really don't want to P. O. him after only 2 days. However, the new structure is possibly not tied-in right. The 2x6 were cut at angles and set on top of the decking. OUr roof has a 6/12 pitch. The very tip of the 2x6s are resting over the wall but it looks like the whoe thing slid off some before it was attached because it is only touching the roof for about 1 1/2-2 inches. The 2x6s are spaced further apart than the roof's and are not lying over or nailed to them in any way. There is 2xsomething nailed to the decking just back from the fasia and 2x4 nailed upright, perpendicular to that.(at the very front edge of the existing roof). It appears that all of the weight is resting on this 2x4 which is cracking around the nails on 3 of 6 ends ( but nowhere in the middle). In the center of the soffit there is some sagging. There was a small amount of rot there due to a small leak around a plumbing exhaust pipe and the t&g was cut out here (and replaced with scrap non- t&g from the torn down cover) The small amount of rot in the support was left and I was told that it didn't matter as it was close to the end and would be enclosed and under new patio roof anyway. In our attic two of the large supports for the roof have pulled out apprx 1/2 inch. This side of the house has a cathedral ceiling and all of the AC vents run along its edge there so it does not have the 4 ft. perlins (sp?) supporting the roof like the other side does.

I talked to the contractor about my concerns and he said not to worry, that he was aware of what I was talking about and it would be fixed (but how? and why did they go ahead and enclose most of it and do the electric after he looked it over in the morning without fixing any of what was wrong? Can it be fixed without being rebuilt? ) Then, less than an hour after I spoke with him, his carpenter called rather upset and said he had just been "reamed out" because I had called, and said I was angry about his work--which I was not, I was merely concerned and had some questions. He was really defensive and said he didn't know what I was talking about and for me to make a list and show him Tues. when they are due back. (The roof is supposed to start then too--I think). My neighbor said they should have cut into the roof and nailed the patio 2x6 to the roof's 2x6 and that I should make sure they don't have the weight resting on the very edge--like it appears to be. Is he right or, am I being paranoid and causing problems for the carpenter? Also, inside we have noticed that the cathedral ceiling's drywall (with thick popcorn) is about 1/8 lower on the side of where the new cover is attached. (I don't know if it was like that before, but we have never noticed it and it is very close to where the skylights are going, so I think I would have seen it). This is our first home and we have no experience with anything like this. Any advice/explanation would be really appreciated. PS should we have a building permit for this work? If so, who is resposible for getting it, me or the contractor? We are paying almost $4000 for this plus the cost of the lights. Is this a fair price?


sadickers

09:40AM | 06/13/04
Member Since: 02/20/04
52 lifetime posts
First I must say that I am not a contractor but have done many projects myself as well as those where I have hired contractors to do the work.

I do not believe that you are out of line in your concerns. I can't fully visualize what you are descfribing but there are some things that just don't seem right. I hope any contractors that might read this arn't to offended but there are some out there that shouldn't have contractors licenses or be allowed to build anything. From what you have described, yes you should have a building permit issued buy the the city/county or whoever has jurisdiction where you are located. As to the procurement of that, well that should have been agreeded upon before work ever started. When ever I have used a contract I have made it their responsibility, but you can do it yourself. The permit can be important if the contactor is not doing things to code as the inspector will not sign off on the work. Secondly the contract should provide you with a waiver of lein (it should be recorded with the city/county). This document will protect you from his suppliers in the event that he does not pay them for work or materials. If he doesn't and you do not have this document those people/companies can demad payment from you and file leins against your property. Finally just remember that it is your money that is paying for this work and if you are unsatisfied there is nothing wrong in making it known.

Good luck

Steve
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