COMMUNITY FORUM

hunybun1967

02:39AM | 01/27/06
Member Since: 01/25/06
5 lifetime posts
Bvplumbing
First off good morning all....I bought my house a few years ago and when we were looking at it we turned on all the bath tubs showers and sinks but i didn't hear any noise, but i know now that the owners then had the water running doing dishes or laundry while we were there the 4 times we looked at the house, not strange since it was the weekend and they had a few kids. Any way after we moved in when ever we turn on the water from any where in the house or flush there is a loud creaking noise for about 1 min and sounds like it's just filling up the water pipe space and then stops. I want to know if and when i decide to sell can this be fixed or will i have to look like happy homemaker while people are seeing my house.....would rather fix the problem...have had plumbers in the house but they said that it's gravity with the way the pipes are....but not buying that....let me know what you think...thank you

Sylvan

07:36AM | 01/27/06
Member Since: 01/24/06
1507 lifetime posts
Me_office1
If the noise is from the hot water lines it could very well be the coefficient of expansion per degree per inch causes a creeping sound Or the expansion and contracting of water lines rubbing along the beams or under flooring.

Another problem is excessive velocity as many installers do not take into consideration velocity in relation to piping sizes and do not calculate the PSI into FPS.

Possibly an air chamber maybe needed.

Excessive or unsupported runs of piping is another factor that can cause a noisey plumbing system.

Is this well water or city water?


hunybun1967

07:47AM | 01/27/06
Member Since: 01/25/06
5 lifetime posts
the noise starts when either hot or cold water is turned on. I have city water and a sump pump....everything goes through the pump i assume and if the elec goes out i have a main bathroom that can be used during loss of elec but have not tried it since i figure it goes thru the pump also ....the main bathroom does not have the noise effect at all....the others when water is turned on it makes a loud tick tick tick grumble and sounds almost like when the pipes are even water to air or the pipes fill up then the noise stops for the rest of the time water is on.....but say if someone turns on the water then the noise comes on makes its tick tick sound then stops and they turn the water off....someone comes right after them and turn water on even if in the same place makes the quick noise and stop like always..... i hope that makes sense

Sylvan

08:29AM | 01/27/06
Member Since: 01/24/06
1507 lifetime posts
Me_office1
We have a sligh problem here.

A "sump pump" is normally used for clear water (under ground seepage or storm water) and a sewer ejector is used for waste and soil (toilets) and other fixtures that cannot drain through the gravity system.

once you determine what you have feel free to e mail me.

Sylvan Tieger


Billhart

04:07PM | 01/27/06
Member Since: 04/25/05
1916 lifetime posts
He could also have a booster pump to increase the city pressure.


hunybun1967

09:32AM | 01/29/06
Member Since: 01/25/06
5 lifetime posts
I will look in the paper work from the house from when we bought the house...i do know that last year we replaced the sewer ejector since it had died on us while at work and the plumber told us the one in was very old so i figure came with the house....i had asked what we had by 4 different plumbers and 2 said sump pump and just the ejector pump...thought they were all in the same family and worked together, i didn't know the ejector only had a life span of 10 years...is that true? But the noise was there with old one and with new one. Any way i will check my paper work in the file cabinet from hell so might take a bit to find...thanks for helping me...i have found that so many contractors the ones you have in your house...plumbing...elec, building have so many different thoughts on whats wrong and what to fix.

Sylvan

09:33AM | 01/29/06
Member Since: 01/24/06
1507 lifetime posts
Me_office1
With certain restrictions and making sure the velocity (FPS) does not cause other problems like erosion and hydraulic shock (water hammer)

Local codes should prevail as sometimes the city water supply may not allow for a direction suction type pump may draw to much water and thus cause back syphonage of the other structures connected to the supply

Sylvan

10:00AM | 01/29/06
Member Since: 01/24/06
1507 lifetime posts
Me_office1
The life span on any pump would depend on the quality and usage.

Improperly installed pumps also cause premature failure like short cycling or to high a head (friction losses) and what people throw down the toilet.

Storm water (clear water) should not go into the same ejector sump as sewerage and waste as it puts an extra burden on the system

I personally like to install two ejectors when possible one lead one lag so one pump is not carrying the entire burden, and a separate sump for clear water

The "sump pump" is relatively cheap compared to an ejector.

The noise, if it is from a sewer ejector can be caused by a check valve or to much to volume flowing through a smaller diameter piping. (velocity problems and GPM)

Plastic piping is notorious for conducting noise through out a system for several reasons.

Many so called plumbers do not have the formal education to properly size the ejectors and figure one size fits all or use undersized piping or use the wrong type of check valve which can cause clattering or only buy bottom line products.

Also the sump either storm or sewerage / waste should be cleaned out to remove build up grease and sediment that acclimates on the bottom and inside the impellers.

Ferrous sump pumps normally do not hold up as long as a plastic depending on pH factor and other water quality conditions.


hunybun1967

07:41AM | 01/31/06
Member Since: 01/25/06
5 lifetime posts
Thank you all for your help.....i am gonna to spend some time to find the paper work that i need to give you a better idea what is happening....i painted my office and well things are slowing getting back in there. But i did take a look at the pipes with the pump and the other pipes i could see and they look like the pvc pipes not the copper or metal that are what i call normal pipes that should be used. The former owners seem to do there own work we are finding and are replacing decks and roof and fence...i guess the pipes might be next...more info when it comes or should i find....but would the pvc like pipes make those noises.....i read someone suggest that could be it?

Sylvan

12:53PM | 02/01/06
Member Since: 01/24/06
1507 lifetime posts
Me_office1
Even the manufacturer of cast iron and PVC strongly suggest CI for waste and soil lines and to get away cheaper use plastic for venting.

Chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) by conservative estimate, more than 50 percent of the piping systems in the chemical process and other industries are now within the pressure size and temperature capabilities of such advanced PPS thermoplastics as PVC / CPVC / PP and PVDF

Since thermoplastics are non-conductors, they are immune to the electrolytic or galvanic corrosion that attacks and often destroys metal piping materials, particularly installed under ground. Plastic piping system has one of the lowest "friction losses " of all piping systems (no internal corrosion or sediment build up)

Plastic piping installed is slightly cheaper than its no hub counter part counter part. ( But it had better be properly supported).

Plastic piping is not subject to erosion and therefore can go as high as 10 feet per second (3.04 metres per second) BUT it is supposed to be designed to be 5 FPS (1.52 MPS

I also don't care for the load factor (plastic buried under ground can crush if not protected properly).

There are also lots of documented failures with some plastic piping systems

Personally if water conditions allow I would only trust copper or cast iron for any plumbing systems I install.

Plastic drainage are short radius thus make lots of noise when waste flows inside.

Plastic piping is highly carcinogenic in case of a fire and many folks have passed on from the smoke rather then the fire thus many fire departments will not allow fire fighters to enter a structure where plastic piping is installed see the National fire Protection Association reports(NFPA)

Check out Charlotte foundry who manufascturers both plastic and cast Iron and even they admit plastic is not the best choice for drainage.

If you care about the environment then you certainly will never consider PVC if you have an alternative as PVC cannot be recycled thus it is considered hazardous waste in many areas.

The bursting pressure of plastic has a lot to be desired and the glue and primer are known to cause brain and other types of cancers among liver damage.

Well you did ask


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