COMMUNITY FORUM

Waterrep

03:01PM | 05/11/09
Member Since: 05/10/09
13 lifetime posts
Maybe this will help:

The only way to get "soft" water is with a salt-based water softener.

Don't believe salesman, brochures or websites; demand independant laboratory testing results and certification to support EVERY performance claim.

For an independent forum on various water treatment systems, go to " under Questions & Answers, click on "More"; click on "Chloride in Santa Clarita"; click on the middle box "Salt-free alternatives"; click on "View All", click on "read reviews".

Ken Hoffmann

Waterrep

03:08PM | 05/11/09
Member Since: 05/10/09
13 lifetime posts
None of the three systems you mentioned are independently tested and certified. Usually, it's a good idea to research before you buy.

First, don't automatically believe anything you hear, see or hear about. All companies say hat they are great and the other guys are bad...and this is rarely true. Check-out " for independent reviews and " for independent laboratory results.

Ken Hoffmann

suegauta

10:37AM | 05/12/09
Member Since: 05/11/09
3 lifetime posts
I have a well for my 4 bed/3 bath house with 5 people. I had someone come out to clean my tank for my salt system last week and ever since my house is almost unbearble because it smells of sulpher. I tested my water and it is very hard and has high alkalinity. Everything else was safe. The idea of not having to use salt anymore is very appealing, but I don't want to go ahead and switch to a no salt system if it wont work. I spoke to Pelican and Sunwater systems and they both told me their no salt systems would work for me. Then I called our local culligan man and another water service company and they said the no salt systems don't work. Does anyone have any advice for me?

daviddames

05:55AM | 05/13/09
Member Since: 05/12/09
4 lifetime posts
If you have Hard Water; I have 22 Grains of Hardness; you most likely need a Salt or Potassium type system. I was duped by a salesman and Life Source Water's site into thinking their system was a softener. Their web site actually still states it's a Water Softener. It might work on a home with mild hardness; maybe in the low single digits. Over all I'm disappointed with spending $2000 on a unit and that's why I'm looking on this forum which is filling up with more salesman BS. I've had the unit for almost 4 years now and the 22 Grains stayed exactly the same. I now have a good amount of build up on shower doors, faucets, and I'm starting to worry about my appliances.

If you just have bad tasting water the Life Source might be for you. As it has taken out the smell our water had from the well.

I'm just going to start asking around locally. I was about to go with the Kinetico, but I won't just because Bob owns one; he's got a little more money.

I guess I'll start grilling the neighbors for information.

David

suegauta

06:28AM | 05/13/09
Member Since: 05/11/09
3 lifetime posts
Thanks daviddames for your feedback. Does anyone know how I would test to find out how many grains I have in my water?

daviddames

06:43AM | 05/13/09
Member Since: 05/12/09
4 lifetime posts
I used Sears and then also called up the local water utility; mine is Missouri - American Water which tested it as well. You might have an American Water close by as well; I believe they own utilities in multiple states. That way you hopefully eliminate a mistake in the testing phase.

Note: I'm out of Missouri American Waters' lines; I live in a subdivision with Well Water. If I had Missouri American Water I wouldn't have a problem their water is good. Many friends live within their lines of water and it's Soft and Tastes good right out of the tap. Just wanted to give credit where credit is due.

Waterrep

09:57AM | 05/13/09
Member Since: 05/10/09
13 lifetime posts
Some "helpfull" points to consider:

1. To a salt-based water softener representative, minerals are contaminants, so their interest is in removing minerals.

2. The problem with "hard" water, high in mineral content, is that these minerals tend to attach to hard surfaces, form scale and corrode the surface.

3. The benefit of minerals in the water is that they are "nutrients" necesary to your continued health.

4. There is NO perfect water treatment system as their are negatives and positives to each system type.

5. If you want -

a. A slick, slippery feeling on your skin you either get a salt softener or use Dove soap.

b. No/minimal mineral spots on your glasses, get a salt softener or use a sheeting agent such as Lemmi shine in the dishwasher.

c. Stripped, de-mineralized, aggresive, low-ph water to drink get a R.O. system.

d. Delicious, clean & safe water from every faucet and shower in your home you must research alternative systems at, for example: www.WQA.org and/or www.lacsd.org.

Note: If your application is for your own private well, don't buy anything until:

1. You get a full laboratory well water report (every two years, at least)

2. Seek out independent verifaction of EVERY performance claim; question EVERYTHING.

Good luck,

Ken

Ken Hoffmann

Waterrep

10:10AM | 05/13/09
Member Since: 05/10/09
13 lifetime posts
There are two basic ways to test for hardness levels:

1. A TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) meter. This small device which looks similar to a carpenter's pencil, is placed into a small amount of water and a button is depredd on the top. A small window will show a digital number. Divide that number by 17.1 and you will (supposedly) have your grains of hardness. The problem with this answer is that the TDS meter measure ALL total dissolved minerals, not just the "hardness" minerals calcium and mafnesium. It is possible that you'll have a high TDS but a low calcium/magnesium level.

2. A Hach Hardness Kit - Pour a measured amount of water into a small bottle; place a measured amount of their provided test powder into the water, which will then turn pink; place drops of their reagent into the water and count the drops needed to turn the water blue. 8 drops = 8 grains of hardness.

Note: "Hard" water is healthy water.

Ken Hoffmann

Waterrep

10:42AM | 05/13/09
Member Since: 05/10/09
13 lifetime posts
First, my bio is that I am a Lifesource rep., so keep that in mind.

a. LifeSource states that they are a "Water Softener Alternative", not a softener. The only way to "soften" water is with a salt-based water softener.

b. LifeSource systems do not remove nutrient minerals but most clients note that mineral spots are easily removed (see www.LACSD.org).

c. To minimize mineral spots -

1. In dishwashers, try Cascade Dawn and/or Lemmi-Shine and, once a month, pour a half cup of distilled white vinegar into the bottom and run a short wash..

2. On chrome fixtures, try a light coating of furniture or car wax.

3. Inside shower-heads, try spraying "Clean shower" once a month.

4. On shower doors, try Rainex or Google a product called "Teckon".

Generally, up to about 25 grains of hardness, these products seem to work fine.

Hope this helps.

Ken

Ken Hoffmann
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