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jpspaz

09:20PM | 04/04/07
Member Since: 03/28/07
4 lifetime posts
Bvhvac
We are finishing the room over our garage and need to add ductwork for the heating and cooling. The main send and return ducting for the second floor zone runs through this room so I can tap into it, but I do not know what would be the appropriate size ducting. The ductwork carries both our heat and A/C, so what would be the best placement for the vents and how many do I need for a room that's 23'x 23'? The room will also have a cathedral ceiling with two ceiling fans to promote air movement.

wwwlogsandgrillsdotcom

09:39AM | 04/06/07
Member Since: 02/17/06
19 lifetime posts
It really is a question of how your unit is sized to your overall dwelling space. Sadly enough, often units are sized using rules of thumb rather than specific heat loss/gain calculations and your unit may or may not be able to handle the added load of the bonus room.

As you described it, cathedral ceilings are a bear to heat and cool properly due to the heat rises/cool air drops fact.

Do you have two units or one? If you have two (one up and one down) and the one up always keeps your upstairs the temp you ask it to, you may be able to do it.

If you have one unit for the whole house, I would feel less confident that you could "steal" some air from the system and still accomplish your comfort needs.

If the HVAC folks sized the unit properly in the beginning for the finished space, you may disturb that balance by adding ductwork. On the other hand, it may have been inferred that you would someday finish the bonus room and this could have been accounted for in the design of the system.

Judging from my experience with builders, if you bought the home and did not have a hand in selection of the units when the house was built, I would bet the unit is sized WITHOUT considering the potential of finishing the bonus room.

I would do a little homework on who put the unit in and give them a call and ask them some of these questions. They would be happy to give you a quote on adding the duct work and at the worst would give you some feedback on the probability of it working as you have envisioned.

The worst case scenario is that you finish the room and add the ductwork yourself and then it does not give you the comfort you desire resulting in dissatisfaction or worse yet, the cost of ripping something out and starting over.

Call the HVAC company for an opinion at least.

Reg

Reggie Wilson

http://www.logsandgrills.com

jpspaz

09:52AM | 04/06/07
Member Since: 03/28/07
4 lifetime posts
When we built our house it was designed as an "Energy Saver Home" and that bonus room was to be finished. We chose to hold off for monetary reasons. I can only assume because I am not an expert, that the unit is large enough to cover this room. It is a single unit, with two zones, one for each level. Thanks for your help.

wwwlogsandgrillsdotcom

10:26AM | 04/06/07
Member Since: 02/17/06
19 lifetime posts
I would think that the load of the bonus room was planned for, in that case.

The only way to make sure would be to ask.

Adding the ductwork could be a simple matter of continuing the existing run, but you would maximize the chances of it working properly if the static pressure of the duct system is maintained by properly sizing the added runs. You accomplish this by using a duct-o-later that calculates duct size in relation to cfm of the air handling unit, number of "drops" or registers and length of the duct system.

It is not that hard to calculate, but you need to have the cfm capacity of the unit and some info as to the number of drops and sizing of your existing ductwork to do so.

Good luck!

Reg

Reggie Wilson

http://www.logsandgrills.com

jpspaz

02:06AM | 04/07/07
Member Since: 03/28/07
4 lifetime posts
The ductwork in this zone runs to three bedrooms and two bathrooms. The bedrooms are larger than the bathroom vents. Could I not just use the same size for this additional room? How can I find out more about a ductolater?
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