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bubblepuppy

05:28AM | 01/21/02
Member Since: 01/20/02
10 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
I AM PLANNING ON BUILDING A GAZEBO IN THE SPRING. I HAVE SEARCHED FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO WIRE A GAZEBO ON THE NET, WITH NO LUCK. I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF ANYONE HAS WIRED A GAZEBO FOR 120V RECEPTACLES, AND HOW IT WAS ACCOMPLISHED. I WANT A PROFESSIONAL LOOKING JOB WHEN I DO IT. ANY ADVICE IS APPRECIATED.
THANKS

bubblepuppy

03:26AM | 01/22/02
Member Since: 01/20/02
10 lifetime posts
My primary concerns are asthetic-how to best camoflague the wiring. I know how the wiring part works.

rpxlpx

04:13AM | 01/22/02
Member Since: 03/13/00
1675 lifetime posts
Without knowing what your plan is, let's just suppose the following: the gazebo will not be screened in and you only need one outlet. I would run the wiring underground, come up under the gazebo, and place the outlet on the OUTSIDE of the gazebo facing away from your house (or wherever you can see the gazebo from).
The outlet would be perfectly useable, but not visible from anywhere except the "back", outside of the gazebo.
If you plan to do lighting and a switch inside the gazebo, that's another matter.

bubblepuppy

06:27AM | 01/22/02
Member Since: 01/20/02
10 lifetime posts
Actually, I was thinking of 3 receptacles, approx. equal distances apart, on 3 separate circuits, possibly fed from it's own sub-panel, & a light/fan combo w/switch at a later date. I was hoping to hear from maybe an upscale contractor who may have done a similar job as this-and I would be willing to spend some cash to do it right. The ol' "sneak it behind the post" solution is not acceptable for me this time. But thanks for the input anyway rpxlpx.

Mustang

03:15AM | 01/23/02
Member Since: 01/22/02
101 lifetime posts
Unless you're planning on some really weird things, there's no reason to have 3 recepticles on 3 different circuits, or even it's own sub panel for that matter. I've done this before, for recepticles use shallow boxes and imbed into posts, or incorporate into railing but then will have to frame around. For lighting I'd go with LV, will still need to hide wires, could router channel in posts and then cap, or run along side posts and frame.

bubblepuppy

06:57AM | 01/23/02
Member Since: 01/20/02
10 lifetime posts
HEY MUSTANG:
YA GOTTA KNOW ME! I OVERKILL ALL OF MY PROJECTS! YOU OUGHTA SEE THE SHED I BUILT. THE WALLS WERE FRAMED WITH 4X4'S! (THEY WERE FREE).
BUT IT'S WHAT I WANT. ANYWAY, I THOUGHT OF THE CHANNELLING OF THE POSTS, SURFACE WIRING, ETC. I GUESS I NEED TO GIVE THIS ALL SOME MORE THOUGHT. I'D HATE TO COMPROMISE THE STRUCTURAL STRENGTH OF THE POSTS (THIS GAZEBO WILL BE 14' DIAMETER), BUT I MAY HAVE TO DO WHAT YOU SUGGEST. THANKS FOR THE INPUT.

bubblepuppy

08:23AM | 12/24/04
Member Since: 01/20/02
10 lifetime posts
Thought I'd update anyone who may have been interested in my original post.

I routed a 3/4" square channel into every other post (4 posts-The posts are 6x6's). Embedded a "Bell" box @ 18" A.F.F. Covered each outlet and light switch with a metal "weatherproof in use" cover. Ran U.F. cable down each post, & to the rooftop for lighting & switching. Both power feeds (ltg & rec.) & speaker cables (I also installed a weatherproof electrical box that contains a mini-stereo on one of the posts) come down the post that has the feed conduit at. I put a cast iron weatherproof box at the base of this post.

Gazebo looks Mahvelous!!! I'm happier than a pig in sh%#!

Anyone who'd want details can email me.

Thanks to all who took the time to try to help me.

BV001111

02:03PM | 05/22/13
Glad your project went well. But you shouldn't have routed a 3/4 channel into each of your 6x6 posts.

To put into perspective. A 6x6 has a buckle strength of 17,000 to 21,000 pounds. A 5x6 has the buckle strength of 10,000 pounds. That channel you put into the 6x6 post just to make the light recessed, took away 7,000 pounds of load strength.

BV001568

12:16PM | 07/15/13
I'm in a similar situation. We are constructing a 2nd story gazebo that extends off the corner of a deck. The desire is to have at least two electrical outlets on the opposite sides inside the gazebo in addition to a ceiling fan, hidden lighting that illuminates the ceiling, and an on/off switch by the door that controls the fan and the the lighting. The gazebo is to be screened in and it has already been prepped with its own 20A GFCI breaker on the panel and ran to an external box where the wires are nutted. The entire deck, rails, and uprights are comprised of synthetic decking. My biggest concern is having the switches and receptacles detract from the appearance. Does anyone know of a low-footprint approach that will not draw attention to the plugs and switches while also meeting outdoor electric needs?
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