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EDS_5_OH

07:52AM | 09/23/02
Member Since: 09/22/02
3 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
Hello All,

I am planning on running 100AMP service to my outbuilding from my houses main panel. I plan to use direct bury wire for the run from the house to the building and run conduit from where the wires leave the ground and enter the house and the building. The problem is that I must run the line through my basement to gain access to the panel in the garage. Do I need to run this line in conduit as it runs through my basement ceiling?

Thanks for any help.
Ed

Tom O

02:14PM | 09/23/02
Member Since: 09/17/02
477 lifetime posts
Maybe. If you are using type UF Cable, you will not need conduit in the basement. If you are running individual conductors, you will need to install them in conduit.

By the way, don't forget to install 2 ground rods at the outbuilding.

Tom

EDS_5_OH

04:38AM | 09/24/02
Member Since: 09/22/02
3 lifetime posts
Uhh... 2 Ground rods at the outbuilding? I planned on just the one. Why 2 and where do I put them. I clearly need to review my wiring simplified book before embarking on this electrical journey.

The wire I intended to buy was 2ga direct bury 3 wire cable. I need to look and see if it is UF or not. Is UF sheathed all together or just the 3 strands individually wrapped?

walrus

07:02AM | 09/24/02
Member Since: 09/23/02
2 lifetime posts
with a sub panel you will need 4 wire cable as the neutral(grounded conductor) and the ground have to be seperate. You will need a ground bar in the subpanel that is NOT electrically made to the neutral bar.


tdhorne

10:11AM | 09/24/02
Member Since: 09/01/02
25 lifetime posts
quote:
With a sub panel you will need 4 wire cable as the neutral(grounded conductor) and the ground have to be seperate. You will need a ground bar in the subpanel that is NOT electrically made to the neutral bar.

This is only true if there are metallic pathways between the two buildings. In the absence of such metallic pathways; such as metal water piping; you could use three conductors and wire the outbuildings panel exactly as you would the service equipment. Four wires is much better practice as it lessens the likelihood of stray currents but the NEC specifically permits feeders without equipment grounding conductors (EGC) to separate buildings that do not have metallic pathways between them. Using the no EGC technique can be a real trouble breeder on properties were there are livestock. Because of the length of their stride medium to large domestic animals can suffer much harm in the presence of stray currents that produce step potentials of several volts.
--
Tom

[This message has been edited by tdhorne (edited September 24, 2002).]

EDS_5_OH

10:29AM | 09/24/02
Member Since: 09/22/02
3 lifetime posts
Thanks for the info guys. I plan on using the method Tdhorne described. There is not any hard piping running between the buildings, so although my power source is my main panel in my garage (with a 100amp breaker installed) I will install the service panel as if it were a main service. That is, a grounding rod at the panel entrance near where the 3 wire cable enters the building in the conduit.

Just to ask again, is UF cable 3 individual cables that are sheathed together?


Thanks again, Ed

Any other tips?

walrus

11:31AM | 09/24/02
Member Since: 09/23/02
2 lifetime posts
I stand corrected I thought their was something about outbuildings that was different but...

Joe Tedesco

04:18PM | 09/24/02
Member Since: 07/27/02
140 lifetime posts
...

[This message has been edited by Joe Tedesco (edited April 10, 2003).]

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