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TK

08:27AM | 11/27/02
Member Since: 11/26/02
2 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
I'm looking at rewiring my Kitchen, and wondering if adding a subpanel and then wiring from this would be a good way to go. I already have 120/240 40 amp service which I can upgrade to the room where I want to put the subpanel. Otherwise I have to pull new wires through exiting conduit, the kitchen does not have enough outlets or power to meet my needs. Any good ideas on the best way to do this. TK

Rmiell

09:02AM | 11/27/02
Member Since: 08/31/02
11 lifetime posts
There are numerous rules about doing this work. I would suggest you contact a qualified electrician to do the work. Electrical safety should be foremost on your mind.

Rick Miell

tdhorne

09:30AM | 11/29/02
Member Since: 09/01/02
25 lifetime posts
TK
Do you have a wall space that is thirty inches wide from the floor to a height of six and one half feet and completely free of fixed objects out away from the panel to a depth of thirty six inches to use to locate the panel? Behind the swing of a door often makes a good spot. Does the interior of the wall that you will mount the panel in not have non electric utilities above or below the panel itself. If the answer to any of these questions is no you do not have space for a panel.

What size is the conduit between this new location and your service equipment? What loads do you wish to serve from this panel? Is your main lighting and appliance panel board maxed out or does it have enough breakers left to feed the loads you want to add in the kitchen?

If you can provide clear answers to these questions then we can give you some preliminary advice.
--
Tom



TK

04:04PM | 12/02/02
Member Since: 11/26/02
2 lifetime posts
I am having the main panel upgraded to 150 amp service. right now it predates 1960 and the electrician strongly recomended to up graded it. ($1400.00). The room the subpanel would go into is 20x20 by 7 foot ceiling and is located under my garage and about 35'from the main panel and adjacent to the laundry room on the lower level. The kitchen is directly above the laundry room. I need service for an electric oven,refrig.,microwave, dishwasher, two 20amp service lines. I have two 1" conduit's running into the laundry room then to the kitchen. One for the oven 40amp and one microwave 20 amp. Currently two additional 20 amp lines run the washer and gas dryer and also the kitchen outlets. And I need to change that so the laundry room is seperate.I have done wiring before so I am comfortable with it. The electrician wants $2400.00 to rewire, a little more then I can afford. My thinking is if I can run all new circuits from a subpanel this would make it easier to do the job. Thanks for your advice Tk

tdhorne

08:23AM | 12/08/02
Member Since: 09/01/02
25 lifetime posts
quote:
I am having the main panel upgraded to 150 amp service. right now it predates 1960 and the electrician strongly recommended to up graded it. ($1400.00). The room the sub panel would go into is 20x20 by 7 foot ceiling and is located under my garage and about 35' from the main panel and adjacent to the laundry room on the lower level. The kitchen is directly above the laundry room. I need service for an electric oven, refrig., microwave, dishwasher, two 20 amp service lines. I have two 1" conduit's running into the laundry room then to the kitchen. One for the oven 40 amp and one microwave 20 amp. Currently two additional 20 amp lines run the washer and gas dryer and also the kitchen outlets. And I need to change that so the laundry room is seperate. I have done wiring before so I am comfortable with it. The electrician wants $2400.00 to rewire, a little more then I can afford. My thinking is if I can run all new circuits from a sub panel this would make it easier to do the job. Thanks for your advice Tk

TK
Is all of that work run in conduit? Do you have the skills and tools necessary to rerouting the conduits into the cabinet of the sub panel?

Your one inch conduit will carry the wires to supply a 100 ampere, sixteen circuit panel. Those wires would be three number three copper conductors with THHN insulation and a number eight copper conductor that is bare or has green colored insulation. You will need to purchase an additional equipment grounding buss bar for your panel unless it is included. This will give you one insulated buss bar to which all of the grounded (white neutral) conductors will be connected and one uninsulated buss bar that is attached directly to the cabinet of the panel by it's mounting screws onto which you will terminate all of the bare or green Equipment Grounding Conductors (EGCs). You will remove and discard the screw or strap that connects the insulated buss bar to the "sub" panel's cabinet. Connect the bare or green number eight to the uninsulated bonded buss bar in the "sub" panel cabinet. Tape both ends of one of the number three copper conductors with white tape. Connect that conductor to the insulated buss bar of the "sub" panel. Connect the two black number three copper conductors to the two main lugs of the "sub" panel. Run all of your branch circuits to the outlets for the loads you have named. Test all circuits clear of crosses or ground faults. Connect the bare/green number eight and the white taped number three to the bonded buss bar of your main panel. If your main panel has both bonded / uninsulated buss bar and an insulated buss bar then you will connect those two wires exactly as you did in the "sub" panel. Connect the two black number three copper conductors to the terminals of a two pole one hundred ampere breaker in the main panel. With all branch circuit breakers in the "sub" panel closed test again between each of the feeder breaker terminals and the bonded buss bar of the main panel to be sure that there is no fault in the new feeder or branch circuits. Open all breakers in the "sub" panel! Close the breaker that is now connected to the feeder conductors. You then close the branch circuit breakers in the "sub" panel one at a time. If no smoke is generated you are said to have passed the "smoke test".

The microwave circuit gets placed in the "sub" panel since you will have used it's raceway to run the feeder to the panel. The oven circuit you can leave entirely alone. You will then have to route the fridge, microwave, dish washer, food waste disposer, and two or more small appliance branch circuits from the "sub" panel. That brings you to eight or nine circuits in that panel.

If any of that is not clear then you should back off and save up to have the electrician do it.
--
Tom

[This message has been edited by tdhorne (edited December 08, 2002).]

electricmanscott

04:00PM | 12/11/02
Member Since: 11/05/01
98 lifetime posts
"The electrician wants $2400.00 to rewire, a little more than I can afford". This $2400.00 is far less than the cost of a new house after an electrical fire. Why not split the project into several smaller projects and pay a professional to have it done properly? No matter how good or bad the advice you get here is, you simply can not learn to wire a home on the internet. It just can't be done.
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