COMMUNITY FORUM

DIYer

11:47AM | 06/18/03
Member Since: 06/16/03
12 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
I just installed an asko dishwasher, which required me to take the hard-wired line from the old dishwasher and turn it into an outlet that I can plug the asko into.

My question is now that it is an outlet, can I use the same line to add a couple more outlets in the kitchen or should I keep it a dedicated line to the dishwasher?

Thanks!

Tom O

12:06PM | 06/19/03
Member Since: 09/17/02
477 lifetime posts
You could add some outlets on this circuit, but only if the load of the dishwasher is 50% or less of the circuit.

For example, 7 1/2 amps or less on a 15 amp circuit or 10 amps or less on a 20 amp circuit.

This presumes that your dishwasher is not portable.

Tom

MrElectricOly

07:25PM | 06/20/03
Member Since: 05/11/03
62 lifetime posts
I hate to disagree with Tom, but I do. The NEC clearly requires outlets in a kitchen to have "no other outlets" on the circuit. Since the dishwasher is an appliance you are able to add other appliances like a disposal, or instant-hot to the circuit. Mr. Electric

[This message has been edited by MrElectricOly (edited June 20, 2003).]

dana1028

05:34PM | 06/21/03
Member Since: 08/30/02
32 lifetime posts
Mr. Electric - read (1999) 210-52(b)(3) carefully. This section is addressing the small appliance branch circuits in a kitchen.

"Additional small-appliance branch circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the kitchen and other rooms specified in (b)(1) [dining room, pantry, etc].

This looks like one of those hair splitting situations...this dishwasher is an additional circuit and is on a receptacle. You could argue this additional circuit would be allowed to provide additional receptacles in the kitchen.

(b)(2) - "The 2 or more small-appliance branch circuits...shall have no other outlets" refers to using these circuits to supply receps on other rooms of the house not listed in (b)(1) [dining room, pantry, etc].

I know this will prob. cause some arguments, but I believe this section does permit flexibility.

MrElectricOly

08:48PM | 06/21/03
Member Since: 05/11/03
62 lifetime posts
If you talk to anyone on the code panel their intention is clearly that kitchen counter outlets only supply power to portable kitchen appliances (the only exception being a gas range or oven that requires 120v). I agree that the 50% allowance is there, but I think any inspector would have a problem with kitchen outlets comming off the same circuit as the dishwasher. Mr. Electric
PS: A good place to get a definate answer is to post the same question on the board at IAEI.org

Tom O

02:49AM | 06/22/03
Member Since: 09/17/02
477 lifetime posts
Lets not forget switched outlets as permitted in exception 1 to 210.52(B)(1)

The best installation though, would be to leave the dishwasher on its own circuit & add an additional 20 amp small appliance circuit & this is the advice that I should have give in my first reply to the question.

dana1028

12:08PM | 06/22/03
Member Since: 08/30/02
32 lifetime posts
ditto Tom -

DIYer

07:27AM | 06/23/03
Member Since: 06/16/03
12 lifetime posts
Guys,

thanks for the feedback. Good exchange of info. I agree adding another circuit would be best, but I ran out of room in the box. Since I added this outlet for the dishwasher, I thought i'd inquire about using it to add two more outlets along the counter wall.

I need to have my service changed shortly anyway, so I guess I can wait until then, and have it done right.

Thanks again.

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