COMMUNITY FORUM

bcahill

07:39PM | 01/23/07
Member Since: 01/22/07
4 lifetime posts
I think I am probably looking for the same cover plates that you are. Did you have any luck?

Billhart

09:23AM | 01/26/07
Member Since: 04/25/05
1915 lifetime posts
DID you go through the WHOLE THREAD?

Specially the links to Dale.

He is one source of switch plate covers. These are in SS, but might be available in other material.

http://www.rensup.com/Switchplates/98222.htm

http://www.rensup.com/Switchplates/98223.htm

http://www.rensup.com/Switchplates/98224.htm

But they are for a different style of switch. IIRC it is the style that Dale has, but I need to reboot computers to see their website so I can check on them.

jthatcher

05:09PM | 01/26/07
Member Since: 01/01/07
4 lifetime posts
Nope, no luck so far. I've been uable to get a hold of Soldoubt (see above), and he seemed like my best chance. I'll keep looking...

dwkremer

09:45AM | 02/24/07
Member Since: 02/23/07
2 lifetime posts
My daughter is purchasing a house that has low voltage switches, thus my review of this thread.

Has anyone considered using wood switch plates? I lasercut many different size and shape parts and have done regular (110v) switches and outlets. I have never done these, but do not see why they cannot be done.

If anyone is interested you can contact me at summerskye@comcast.com

Jasper5

02:34PM | 03/09/07
Member Since: 03/08/07
2 lifetime posts
I'm also looking for several replacement switchplates for the 1961 GE low voltage system. Has anyone found a source? They are ivory colored, and come in 1, 2, and 3 gang styles. I've checked every site out on this thread, and other than the two photos that were posted, nothing matches what we need at our home. The switches and system are fine - the plates are what we must replace.

If we can't find the plates, do we have to rewire each switch or the whole house to replace it? Electricity is not my strongpoint. Thanks.

dwkremer

04:23AM | 03/10/07
Member Since: 02/23/07
2 lifetime posts
I Laser Cut 110v switch/outlet plates from wood. There is no reason I cannot do this for low voltage plates except I need a existing switch plate to layout from.

Wood plates can be stained or painted to match your needs.

If you are interested you may contact me at summerskye@comcast.net.

antonis

04:41PM | 03/10/07
Member Since: 03/09/07
2 lifetime posts
I am looking for 3 Amp 24 V low voltage switches made by 'square D' company in the late 40's and 50's. Their model number was 1091, 1092 and 1093. They work just fine but I need a few replaclements. A Sierra company made similar type switches and I could use these also. Is anyone out there who knows what can be used now to replace these very old items? I will appreciate your help.

you can e-mail me at

Tony

faph2000@yahoo.com

dnldchamb9

11:18AM | 03/18/07
Member Since: 03/17/07
1 lifetime posts
You can get replacement relays (RR9 and RR9-EZ)and switches (RS2-32 switch; RS2-32P switch with pilot light)from GE Supply. A GE Supply store is likely to be found in most major cities. Look them up on the internet at GE Supply.com also. They do not make exact switch replacements for the 1961 systems anymore, but the switches available today will fit pretty well in existing older mountings. For appearance sake you might want to scrounge and group old style working switches together in some locations and then replace all the switches with new ones in a few other locations. Plates and switches are available in ivory, and there are stainless steel plates as well for up to four devices. One or two switches - one gang; three or four switches - two gang). There is also an 8-switch controller available. It needs a 2-gang box. The stuff will probably be special order at the counter in the store, but prices are reasonable and quality is good. These devices are still used in office buildings. You can also replace the switches with 120-volt momentary contact switches to work the 24-volt relay circuit. (The handle stays center and can be pushed up or down; it returns to center be spring action). You can only fit one per gang, but you can use any kind of plate you want. Not bad for one or two-switch locations. The theory is not difficult but if you don't understand electrical circuits, get help from a friend who does.

antonis

05:06PM | 03/18/07
Member Since: 03/09/07
2 lifetime posts
Thank you , Sir - I appreciate your help and will try that.

Antonis
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