COMMUNITY FORUM

rwdean2210

06:55AM | 09/17/07
Member Since: 08/13/06
2 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
Can you please advise if it is common that arc fault breaker are subject to failure. This case involves a 3 year old breaker that will not reset.

Can you advise of tests to perform before replacement.

Billhart

07:55AM | 09/17/07
Member Since: 04/25/05
1918 lifetime posts
They do fail, but I don't know how often.

SQ D did have a recall out on theirs a couple of years ago, but IIRC becasue they would not trip.

But a house would typically have several AFCI's. Swap it with another one.

rwdean2210

10:15AM | 09/17/07
Member Since: 08/13/06
2 lifetime posts
Thank you, I think i will first take off the load (disconnect the hot wire to the bedroom from the breaker)and see if the breaker will reset...if not...I will replace the breaker

ultramegabob

03:10AM | 10/29/07
Member Since: 08/27/07
23 lifetime posts
The local inspector where im from sent out letters to contractors about a year ago stating that due to a high amount of recalls and annoyance tripping on arc fault breakers they were no longer being required, and I believe he included a sheet showing that it was being removed from the NEC, I will see if I can the letter and let you know what it said exactly...

Billhart

04:00AM | 10/29/07
Member Since: 04/25/05
1918 lifetime posts
A number of local amendments don't require the AFCI.

But the NEC has gone in the oposite direction. The 2008 requires ALL residential general purpose 120 v circuits be protected with an AFCI.

I have not seen a copy so I don't know the exact wording and if it includes deddicated circuits or not.

ultramegabob

02:43AM | 10/31/07
Member Since: 08/27/07
23 lifetime posts
how exactly does "local amendments" work, if NEC is going to require arc faults on all circuits, how do they go around code and say they are not required? do I need to be concernd with liability issues when thier is a conflict of code like this?

Billhart

04:32AM | 10/31/07
Member Since: 04/25/05
1918 lifetime posts
Although it says National Electrical Code or Internation Buildding Code, etc they are nothing of the sort.

They are only books of suggestions.

A government enity needs to adopt them. That is usally a state or local city/county. In some areas there are no codes.

It has to be adopted by the legistalive body. When they do they specify which code is adopted. At least plumbing there are 2 active codes (UPC, IPC).

And they specify which version (date) and any local amendments.

They will read something like;

"Adopted 20008 NEC with the exception of parapgraph 123.4 and 125.1-125.5. And paragraph 234.5 is deleted and replacedd with '...............'."

In some places they changes are significant enough that the governement writes there own. A few are still completely written in house. But commonly they say "based on xxxx code". But they are a heavely rewritten.

The only liability would be if you to something that agreed with the "national" code, but was directly against the local adopted code.

The local adopted code is LAW.
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