COMMUNITY FORUM

mnobles

11:31AM | 08/29/00
Member Since: 08/28/00
2 lifetime posts
Bvbrush
We are using Peel Away 1 to remove about nine layers of paint (some lead) from the woodwork in our 80 year old house. It is working like a dream - removes all the paint down to bare wood in one application - but how meticulous do we need to be when removing residue? We are following the directions, i.e., washing down with water, then neutralizing with vinegar, but I'm still worried that minute amounts will remain in nooks and crannies, and I certainly don't want our new paint peeling away. Any suggestions?

Chip

04:56PM | 08/29/00
If you are following all insructions when cleaning the residue then wait the recomended time to dry, lightly sand entirely with at least 150 or greater sand paper or pads and prime with a quality wood primer/undercoater. You should have no problems with the paint peeling. Providing you also use a quality paint, preferably from a pro paint store.

Also lightly sand the primer coat with 220 grit paper for best results.

kathy fitz

12:01PM | 08/30/00
Member Since: 07/10/00
7 lifetime posts
I used peel away and didn't remove all the residue or somehow I didn't neutralize it properly but when I painted on top of the wood a liquidy substance leached thru the paint. Not sure why it happened but thought I'd share that with you.

Chip

01:23PM | 08/30/00
Yes not cleaning the residue properly can pose problems, it is a paint stripper. If you are still concerned after following the directions properly you can use water and a fine steel wool to remove any questionable residue. Be sure to wear dishwashing gloves as the steel wool can leave a tiny splinter or two.

mnobles

01:20PM | 08/31/00
Member Since: 08/28/00
2 lifetime posts
Chip,

Thanks for the advice. We have been doing as you suggested -- rinsing, neutralizing, then scrubbing down again with water and steel wool. We haven't started sanding yet, but now I know exactly what to do when we get there. We will be using Benjamin Moore Fresh Start (100% acrylic primer as per the instructions) and Benjamin Moore paint (I wouldn't use anything else). Thanks again for your input!

Chip

01:52PM | 08/31/00
Glad to help, let us now how it turns out.

One more tip, get some tack cloths from your paint store. Be sure to dust off before priming. After lightly sanding the prime coat (220 grit) and dusting, use the tack cloths to remove any remaing dust or particles.

hy

06:27PM | 09/02/00
Member Since: 07/11/00
80 lifetime posts
It is very important that you remove all of the PEEL AWAY residue with clean water and a scrub brush if needed. Inside you can use vinegar to neutralize the surface (two applications) and test the pH to see you are neutral (between 6/8) Let the surfae dry about a week to ten days then use a good 100% acrylic primer and you should have no problem. An acrylic primer will compensate for any higgher level of pH that might still be left and will allow the surface to breather if there is still a little moisture inside
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