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reglrguy

07:29PM | 01/20/01
Member Since: 01/20/01
1 lifetime posts
Bvbrush
I am about to paint my newly installed drywall and have been told that I can rent a sprayer and spray the texture on using the same joint compound that I taped with. The result should be to coat the walls to achieve that "orange peel" texture. Is that better than using a texture roller & paint? Also, which do you do first: Walls or Ceiling...I'm thinking walls first as the ceiling would be impossible to tape off. NOW, anything better or easier for the ceiling other than that popcorn finish?? Thanks for any tips...

Lawrence

05:22AM | 01/25/01
Member Since: 11/14/00
333 lifetime posts
You can apply texture through a sprayer. However, make sure the sprayer can handle joint compound because most sparayers can only handle the viscosity of plain paint.

Ceilings are better to do first because they are more difficult to work on. (Do the hard part using the easiest method.) If you use a sprayer, you can get a large sheet-metal spray guard which measures about 1 foot by three feet with a big handle on it. Hold it at the corner and slide it as you go. Actually, you should use the sheet metal guard even if you texture with a brush because it provides quicker, better, and easier protection than masking tape.

Popcorn finish should be banned for aesthetic reasons: it is just ugly. There are too many texture finishes available to go over here. For instance, you can brush joint compound in many different ways: circles, seashells semi-circles, random-abstract brush strokes.... Consult a home decor book.

However, I tend to prefer a nice, flat ceiling that creates sharp, crisp lines. It takes only a bit more effort than texturing, but it is really worth it.

rpxlpx

03:52AM | 01/26/01
Member Since: 03/13/00
1678 lifetime posts
I agree with Lawrence. Popcorn ceilings are bad, smooth ceilings are good. If you ever have damage or a water leak, or if you just want to clean the ceiling, or paint it, popcorn is a problem. A smooth ceiling is as easy to repair, clean, or paint as a smooth wall. A good job can be done by any homeowner. Not necessarily so with popcorn.

[This message has been edited by rpxlpx (edited January 26, 2001).]

PattyB

11:19AM | 01/26/01
I happen to have both types of ceilings in my home. Even tho I did a terrific job of finishing the drywall on the ceilings in my house (not my favorite job) I went to work one Sat. and came home to find that my husband had textured LR, Kit., & our BR by bopping them with a circular brush loaded down with diluted lite wt. joint compound. Won't even discuss what my reaction to this creativity was. Yes, they do look interesting and yes, he did a good job. No, would not like it if he touches another ceiling. They are impossible to keep clean, have to sweep them once a week. Are very difficult to paint, needed 4" roller. First time painting took 1 coat primer and 2 finish. Did them 1 1/2 yrs. ago and they need to be redone. I guess if you haven't done such a good job taping & finishing the ceilings this method would hide a multitude of sins, don't think popcorn would cover as well or hold up too well to painting. But, they are your walls and ceilings, the choice is yours.

PattyB

11:19AM | 01/26/01
I happen to have both types of ceilings in my home. Even tho I did a terrific job of finishing the drywall on the ceilings in my house (not my favorite job) I went to work one Sat. and came home to find that my husband had textured LR, Kit., & our BR by bopping them with a circular brush loaded down with diluted lite wt. joint compound. Won't even discuss what my reaction to this creativity was. Yes, they do look interesting and yes, he did a good job. No, would not like it if he touches another ceiling. They are impossible to keep clean, have to sweep them once a week. Are very difficult to paint, needed 4" roller. First time painting took 1 coat primer and 2 finish. Did them 1 1/2 yrs. ago and they need to be redone. I guess if you haven't done such a good job taping & finishing the ceilings this method would hide a multitude of sins, don't think popcorn would cover as well or hold up too well to painting. But, they are your walls and ceilings, the choice is yours.

Clara

03:39PM | 09/23/03
Member Since: 09/22/03
3 lifetime posts
Lawrence...I want the flat surface also for my ceiling and walls. What tool is used to apply the drywall compound in order to get a flat surface? A trowel? Any reply would be greatly appreciated.

k2

07:22PM | 09/23/03
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hi Clara,

I'm doing some drywalling for a little home project and find that if I end with a 10-12" wide trowel that it comes out pretty darn flat. (This wide trowel should be about the 3rd one you use--as you work progressively wider.) Obviously if you started with tapered edges it is easier.

Suggestion: Aim a really bright light while you work, so you can see every imperfection. This is a tough test.

Clara

11:42AM | 09/25/03
Member Since: 09/22/03
3 lifetime posts
k2,
Thanks, your reply is very helpful. I've never used drywall compound before. What do you mean by starting with tapered edges? Help!! I now have more questions: Do I need to thin the drywall compound with water before applying to the walls? I think not. I have primed them with Kilz. Do I reprime them after the drywall compound is applied before painting?

k2

04:46PM | 09/25/03
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hello Clara,

The "tapered edges" are built into the drywall. They run the 8' length down the sides of the 4x8' sheet. It really is a tapered edge (hence the name )--a kind of bevel--the edge is thinner than the 1/2" sheet. It's definitely useful--not only where sheets butt up against one another--but because the edge is a bit stronger than the middle of the sheet and can take a bit more abuse. (The tapered edges end up getting filled by 'mud' and drywall tape, and end up flat).

Tips: Screws or nails--aim for below the drywall surface but DO NOT break the paper. Tape--it looks like you can use 'either side up' but not true--it is one-sided.

I buy drywall compound in the big (HEAVY!) buckets...and then move them to a smaller bucket for the day's use (I put plastic wrap on the top of the big bucket's mud, to keep it fresher). I like "suballocating" it because #1, easier to manage, #2, you limit the "pollution" (particles, etc) to that day's use. Oh, and #3, when you're done, you stop for the day! You use more mud than you think.

I buy the pre-mix, and DO NOT thin!!!!

Use of a primer paint is a good idea, as you don't want your decorator paint soaking in (costs more!).

I am just a homeowner and regular remodeler--I'm not a pro drywaller. But I've done quite a bit and am in the middle of our kitchen now. Remember, you want the wall to be FLAT. So if there's a depression, tapered edge, etc, you FILL IN that area.

VERY IMPORTANT: Don't overwork the "mud". Don't mess with it if it's "pretty good" or if it's drying (takes overnight). Don't oversand. I find mudding to be a good end-of-day task. (Less chance of running into it by mistake--and it doesn't have to be perfect!) Don't aim for perfection--whether sanding or mudding. It's a forgiving activity--if you're willing to wait the extra day for getting it lots better. Sanding---just knock down high spots and other high imperfections.

Remember, you're going for FLAT, so sand the high spots, and fill the low spots. I've done quite a bit, and it's still too tempting to try and do too much at once. (For example, you can end up sanding through the paper tape--not pretty).

Good luck, any more questions please don't hesitate to ask! (And with luck, maybe an actual pro might respond!) Again, good luck Clara!

-k2 in Colorado

[This message has been edited by k2 (edited September 25, 2003).]

Clara

11:56AM | 09/26/03
Member Since: 09/22/03
3 lifetime posts

Hello K2,
Thanks for the great tips and information. I feel like now I can get started. I'll let you know how it turns out.

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