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KimTx

11:50AM | 09/09/01
Member Since: 09/08/01
7 lifetime posts
Bvbrush
Hi,

New here and need advice on several painting techniques and the proper way to do it.

First, we built our home 10 years ago and we had the builder paint the bedroom with a flat paint in off white, now we are ready to update. I want to get my comforter, etc before choosing paint, but I need to know what I should do to prepare the wall to paint it. I want to use a semi-gloss paint since it will be easier to clean. We want the best paint, but costs are involed here. Would Wal-Mart paint be just as good as any other?

Now on to the other, We live in east Texas and own a 350 cattle ranch which mean we have a lot of dust. And three boy's. Through our vents we have noticed that over the years the celing is getting covered in dust right out side the vent. The celings were sprayed in white for the speckle finish. How do we properly clean the cleing without losing the speckle (popcorn)?

Also, in our kitchen, our son was so cute one day by showing me that the chocolate milk won't spray after being shaken. LOL! well the top blew off the bottle and now I have a chocolate stain on my celing which is white. Need correct procedure on how to repaint the celing. Again, that speckled (popcorn) spray painted. This was not funny when it happened, but now it is. LOL!

Now, when we built this house we were totally into wallpaper. Now my kitchen has wallpaper on every wall. Still like it, but time to update. How do we remove the wallpaper from the drywall? The wall was never painted. We did our children's bathroom and it was a burger of a job. LOL!

On the breakfast room wall we opted for chair rails and on the bottom half we painted it white to start. Couple of years later I painted again in a dark Mauve color. Now I want to brighten up that wall. Should I paint over the dark with the light several times or remove the dark paint and start over? I don't want build up of paint. If I remove the darker paint what is the proper procedure and products?

Last thing. In the hall of our children's bedroom around one corner the drywall has been chipped by toys, etc. How do we correctly fix the corner?

Well, this will get me started and I look forward to everyone's advice.

Jay J

07:42AM | 09/10/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi KimTx,

WOW! Lots going on here. I think I should charge you for all this help!!!

Assuming the paint on the walls is Latex, you can clean it with A LITTLE mild soap and water, and 'rinse'. If there are any stains or marks, use a latex-based Primer/Sealer. For 'heavy' stains/marks, do a 2nd coat (per the wait-time on the Instructions.) Yes, semi-gloss will be easier to clean than flat. The best paint is a point of preference to most folks. I, personally, spend the $$$ for good paint at a local Paint Retailer. Their paint is made 'better' than the chain store paints (in my opinion.) Believe it or not, the SHerwinn-Williams, Pratt and Lamberts, and so on, make paints for the chain stores based on the chain store's specification. And a lot of times, their specs are 'cheaper'. If the paint was the same in both stores, it wouldn't matter where you bought it because your only 'criteria' would be price.

Clean the popcorn ceiling (dust only) w/a vacume with a LONG bristled handle. You may want to use a vacume that has low suction. You know, in your particular environment, the LAST thing you need is 'something' that holds duct. Yes, if you're not too careful, you will ruin your ceiling. You could try using a feather brush to 'lift' the dust off while holding a vacume hose near the area you're working on to **** the dust as it falls from the ceiling.

Assuming the chocolate stain on the ceiling is dry, buy some white primer/sealer in a spray can. Put on a couple of LIGHT coatings and wait the necessary drying time between coating. Feather it out as you spray so it blends in. Then, do the same thing with your FINISH paint. I know it won't match exactly which is why you 1) apply MULTIPLE, light coatings (until you get the color), and 2) feather out as you spray (so you don't notice the new paint.) Now, granted, YOU will probably see the difference. However, your guests will have a 'lesser eye' unless you've done a 'lousy job' of the priming and feathering finish.

It's kind of a shame the drywall wasn't primed/painted before the wallpaper was hung. A painted wall makes it a little easier to remove wallpaper from. Visit Zinsser.com for information on their products. Use their DIF and Paper Tiger. Follow the directions TO-THE-T or you'll be telling us the 'stuff' is lousy. Buy heavy rubber gloves so you don't burn yourself using the BOILING, HOT water. Keep the teapot on low (and the kids away from the stove) while you work so you always have hot water available. DIF is cheap so buy more than you need. The keys are: boiling hot water, using a clean solution, waiting the necessary time between coatings, keeping the paper WET as you 'scrape', and making sure you perforate the paper just enough to get to the drywall. (If you press TOO hard w/the Paper Tiger, you'll have a HUGE spackling job!)

Since you're going from a DARK paint to a light paint color (below your chair rail), just prime/seal it w/Primer/Sealer. Do 2 coatings. Plan on at least 2 top/finish coatings of paint. Use Painter's Masking Tape, NOT regular Masking Tape on all surfaces.

If you have some minor spackling, you'll need to buy a small tub of Spackle. First, assess the amount of damage you have. Then, when you go to the store, buy the appropriate sized tub. When you're NOT using the tub, lay a piece of Saran Wrap over the spackle to keep the moisture in. (Put the lid on TIGHT too.) Buy yourself a book on How To Do Drywall at the Home Center. (It may be a Chapter in a much larger book so flit through it first to be SURE it has the info you need.) The Instructions will tell you what to do w/the spackle. The Book will tell you how to do it.

I've said enough. As you're doing each job, come back w/specific questions. DON'T try to do too much at one time. It will look overwhelming.

My best to ya and hope this helps.

Jay J -Moderator

KimTx

08:18AM | 09/10/01
Member Since: 09/08/01
7 lifetime posts
Hi Jay,

YES, you should charge me for all this advice! LOL! You say:

Assuming the paint on the walls is Latex, you can clean it with A LITTLE mild soap and water, and 'rinse'.

How do I know if this is a Latex paint? The builder painted it. When I do try to clean the wall sometimes if I apply to much pressure it comes off on the rag. Does that help? LOL!

If there are any stains or marks, use a latex-based Primer/Sealer. For 'heavy' stains/marks, do a 2nd coat (per the wait-time on the Instructions.) Yes, semi-gloss will be easier to clean than flat. The best paint is a point of preference to most folks.

When using the Primer/Sealer - Do I put this all over the wall that I am painting or just on the places that I can't get clean enough?

I, personally, spend the $$$ for good paint at a local Paint Retailer. Their paint is made 'better' than the chain store paints (in my opinion.) Believe it or not, the SHerwinn-Williams, Pratt and Lamberts, and so on, make paints for the chain stores based on the chain store's specification. And a lot of times, their specs are 'cheaper'. If the paint was the same in both stores, it wouldn't matter where you bought it because your only 'criteria' would be price.


I totally agree. So, I should probably use the local paint store opposed to a national chain store. Thanks I did not know this. Any particular brand?

I will only concentrate on the bedroom for now since it needs it more and I will ask more questions as I move along on all these projects. Thank so much

Jay J

04:56AM | 09/11/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi KimTx,

Latex vs. Oil: If it's Latex, then Methyl Hydrate will wash the paint off. If it's oil-basd, it will just clean the wall.

If the paint is oil, and you want to use latex, you MAY be able to use a 100% acrylic latex paint. However, you may have to prep the wall. You see, in short, oil-based paint seals up real well, so well that the latex paint won't be able to 'bond' to the oil-based paint already on the wall. Oil over Latex is OK. Talk to a Paint Retailer about using Latex over oil (if you have oil.) But first, determine what you have. I'll be you have Latex but in kitchens, you MAY have oil-based paint.

When to Prime/Seal: (In your situation only ...) Prime/Seal the ENTIRE wall if your NEW color is LIGHTER than the color on the wall. If you don't P/S, the dark color will 'bleed' through the lighter paint. If you're painting the wall the SAME color, you P/S all stains and marks that don't come clean as well as the 'areas' you had to rub. In other words, on same-color walls, you DON'T have to P/S the areas you LIGHTLY washed. Consider a 2nd P/S coating when putting a lighter paint over a darker paint to REALLY prevent bleeding. (It doesn't have to be pretty - Just get complete coverage.) Remember, plan on 2 finish coatings of your top-coat paint.

About local Paint Retailers: You'll get the BEST service from them. They'll tell you the right 'tools' to use too. (Remember, latex is different from oil so be SURE you ask them for the RIGHT brushes and rollers and such.) Any brand-name Paint Retailer is fine by me. Most Pros have a preference because, once they find something they like, they stick to using it. Pick one that you like, even if it's just a 'popular name'. (Even that has something going for it.)

My best to ya and hope this helps. (If you need 'us', you know where to find us ...)

Jay J -Moderator

Jennifer

10:10AM | 10/04/01
Member Since: 10/03/01
3 lifetime posts
RE: Getting wallpaper off.

I recently bought a house where the previous owners were wallpaper crazy. It has been a lot of work to get it all off, but I have learned a lot!

First, go to your local home improvement store and buy a Wallpaper Scorer (TigerPaper) or whatever is available there. Buy DIF Ready to use GEL and all your other painting accessories. Everything you will need will be in one section near the wallpaper somewhere.

Try to rip off the paper in an area and see what happens. Sometimes the paper will come off leaving the backing behind, which is great!

Score all the wall paper (or hopefully only the backing if you're lucky) using a circular motion. This will create minature holes in the paper. Next, use a large flat paint applier to apply the DIF gel to the paper areas. The DIF will soak through the tiny holes and help eat away at the adhesive underneath. Let sit for a few minutes, but DON"T let it dry. Try pulling off the backing/paper.

Once you have the paper and the backing off, wash the wall immediately with clean water to remove the DIF gel and leftover glue.

If you are UNLUCKY, you will need add another step. If the above does not work, follow all steps except add in a steamer after the DIF gel is applied. You can rent wallpaper steamers at most local hardware stores.

Prime the walls if they have never been painted and then you are ready!

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